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What are you reading?

Printed From: History Community ~ All Empires
Category: Scholarly Pursuits
Forum Name: Literary Pursuits
Forum Discription: all things relating to the written word
URL: http://www.allempires.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=77
Printed Date: 19-Jan-2018 at 08:34
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Topic: What are you reading?
Posted By: Dawn
Subject: What are you reading?
Date Posted: 13-Aug-2004 at 14:37
Every history buff reads something. So tell us what you are reading now.



Replies:
Posted By: Tobodai
Date Posted: 13-Aug-2004 at 14:55

two book ssimultanioulsy as always, lol.

Oxford history of China and Introduction to African civilizations right now.  When I am finished those Ill read Samurai Invasion about the Imjin war.

 

I have recently finished Medieval Persia, Cities in Mesopotamia, and Rise and Fall of the British Empire, Ive been a busy reader.



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"the people are nothing but a great beast...
I have learned to hold popular opinion of no value."
-Alexander Hamilton


Posted By: Cywr
Date Posted: 13-Aug-2004 at 14:57
I'm on a Sci-Fi break myself, Pandora's star, but the same guy who wrote the Reality Disfunction series. After that i'll continue working my way through the Time-Life:History of the world series (again, read them when i was younger, forgot alot of it though).

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Arrrgh!!"


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 13-Aug-2004 at 15:54
Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

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Posted By: Temujin
Date Posted: 13-Aug-2004 at 16:12

this is a VERY good topic!!  

Originally posted by Tobodai

two book ssimultanioulsy as always, lol.

 

LOL, me too! I'm always reading an hitorical (mostly Osprey LOL) and a novel. I just finished reading "the Motorcyce Diaries" by Ernesto Guevarra in German translation, here it's called "Lationamericana". As a mvie geek I heard about an upcoming movie focusing on Ches first Latinamerican travel that brought him to Chile and Peru in the first line, but also Columbia and Venecuela. I didn't knew much about Che and as Arda, ihsan and me are talking about a possible Central Asian tour I thought it would be nice to read up on a similar experience...I must say it was worth it...Che has a quite unique stile of writing and the book is overall entertaining and has some nice insights into southamerican cultre and also history, it has also a slight Panamercan and Communist touch to it but it didn't disturbed me at least....not sure, I'm probably now also goign to read on his second tor, but first  descided to read "the way of the Samrai" by Yagyu munenori in German translation...I've already read the 5 rings by Musashi and the Hakagure..I thought I 'm now trough with the Samrai stuff, but one book more can't hurt  before the Motorcycle diaries I read Butlers Jihad in German translation (yes, it always takes them a whole year to translate it, and the translation isn't even good  . as a huge Dune fan I must say I was pretty content, it wasn't as bad as the house-triology, still it could be better, especially the end (don't mean the story, but the supposed cliffhangers are badly writte IMO).

the historybook I'm curently reading is Rome's Enemies 3: Parthians and Sassanid Persians from Osprey, it's quite good and I'm almost throught with it (not tha it's that large though). before that I've read Mughul India 1504 - 1761. no clue what I read then, either the Persian army 560-330 BC also from Osprey or Wariors of the Steppe by Hildinger...



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Posted By: Mast
Date Posted: 13-Aug-2004 at 16:51
I recently bought the "The Da Vinci code" and I am planning on reading it soon.

First however, I am finishing this amusing swedish book about a fictional viking's journey, "Red Orm".


Posted By: Cornellia
Date Posted: 13-Aug-2004 at 19:48

I'm reading several books as well.  LOL 

Cleopatra by Michael Grant and The Pageant of Early Tudor England by Elizabeth Burton.   I keep a copy of Roman Women in my jeep for those times I'm stuck in a line at the bank or in traffic.  LOL  I hate just sitting there with nothing to do.

As for fiction,  I have just finished Terry Pratchett's Hat Full of Sky and Dan Brown's DaVinci Code.  Both are really worth reading.



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Felix qui potuit rerum cognoscere causas


Posted By: cattus
Date Posted: 13-Aug-2004 at 20:05
Originally posted by Cornellia

  I keep a copy of Roman Women in my jeep for those times I'm stuck in a line at the bank or in traffic.  LOL  I hate just sitting there with nothing to do.

You are such a geek!   Btw, is there anybody who has not read the De Vinci Code?



Posted By: Tobodai
Date Posted: 13-Aug-2004 at 20:26

I havent, Im too busy reading austere textbooks for fiction, though I must recommend a fiction I read last year.  The Years of Rice and Salt is a reincarnation story taking place in an alternate world were the black death killed off all the Europeans.

I beleive tha last Osprey book I read was Medieval Russian Armies 2 or East Asian ships I forget which.

I also recommend for all the Chinggis fans here the new jake Weatherford book Genghis Khan and the founding of the modern world, I met his Mongolian co author at Karakorum!



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"the people are nothing but a great beast...
I have learned to hold popular opinion of no value."
-Alexander Hamilton


Posted By: Mast
Date Posted: 14-Aug-2004 at 05:08
Btw, is there anybody who has not read the De Vinci Code?


*Raises hand* I bought the english version because it was cheaper than the swedish one, let's see if I understand anything.


Posted By: Cornellia
Date Posted: 14-Aug-2004 at 09:09
Originally posted by Catt

You are such a geek!   Btw, is there anybody who has not read the De Vinci Code?

Yes I am!! 

But I'm a cute one. 



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Felix qui potuit rerum cognoscere causas


Posted By: Lannes
Date Posted: 14-Aug-2004 at 09:26

I'm reading Roman Warfare by:  Adrian Goldsworthy.

Pretty good reading.  He doesn't go into the specifics too often, but he does provide good theories on the Roman approach to warfare.  Good pictures in it too.



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τρέφεται δέ, ὤ Σώκρατης, ψυχὴ τίνι;


Posted By: Dawn
Date Posted: 14-Aug-2004 at 10:32

I like many others here read several books at a time,one or two  novels and a couple of history. Just finished a Canadian novel Jack Absulute by CC Humpries good book and about to start Butlerian Jihad (was it worth reading in your opinion Tamujin or just not bad ?) I must be the only one that hasn't read The Da Vinci code but I haven't had a copy come into my store yet and am to cheap to pay $37 for it in hard cover from Chapters so I wait for paper back

As for history: The devil's Crown: HenryII and his son's - good book reads like a novel. The war of the Roses and The princes in the Tower by Alison Wiers - similair and go together well although she seems very agianst Richard III and it comes through in her selection of sources. If it doesn't fit she ignores it. and just finished Richard III by Kendal

 

 



Posted By: Dawn
Date Posted: 14-Aug-2004 at 10:34
Originally posted by Cornellia

Cleopatra by Michael Grant and The Pageant of Early Tudor England by Elizabeth Burton.  

 

How do you like Grant ? I read his "The world of Rome" and couldn't deside if I liked hoim or not. 



Posted By: cattus
Date Posted: 14-Aug-2004 at 10:49
Originally posted by Cornellia

But I'm a cute one. 

LOL what ever you say four eyes!  You are cute in a sorta Napoleon Dynamite kinda way.      ...just kidding you are an attractive geek indeed.

Might take that recommendation Lannes. I love AG,hes one of my favorite new historians. I have and refer to his Punic Wars often.



Posted By: Cornellia
Date Posted: 14-Aug-2004 at 11:04

I like Grant because he's readable, his history is for the most part, fairly solid, and he offers new insights on things.

That said, I do often check other sources on points he brings up and have sometimes found discrepancies.

Cornellia Four Eyes. 



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Felix qui potuit rerum cognoscere causas


Posted By: Dawn
Date Posted: 14-Aug-2004 at 15:20
I found him slightly more difficult to read and also found some questionable facts but OK. Perhaps the difficulty was just in the mood I was in when I read that one.


Posted By: Jr_Capablanca
Date Posted: 14-Aug-2004 at 17:38

Hello!

Hi Mast! I`ve read Rde Orm as well, it`s quite entertaining ("...nr han kommit till besjungandet av mjlk och citronvatten..." ).

I`m reading Bellum Iudaeica by Flavius Josephus right now.

/Capa



Posted By: Mosquito
Date Posted: 14-Aug-2004 at 19:05

I just bought 2 novels which were supposed to be about Gaius Iulius Caesar and his life. I think authour is planning trilogy. He is named Conn Igguldin and books are titled : "Emperor: the gates of Rome" and "Emperor:The death of kings". So far i see i just wasted my monay.  The things which this guy writes are total crap and got nothing to to with the real history (eg. Marius is defending Rome with one legion against Sulla who wants to take it with one legion but Sulla's assasins comes to Rome, kills a lot of Marius's soldiers, captures Marius, Sulla kills Marius, Sulla rapes Cornelia - Caesar's wife, someone from casesar's house murders Sulla, Marcus Brutus is the son of prostitute and Caesars's father took him to his home so he is growing up with Caesar and they are like brothers.... and a lot of more weird events). I really wasted my monay I know that writers also got their rights, licentia poetica and such, but that Conn Igguldin  to me seems to be a complete idiot.



Posted By: Dawn
Date Posted: 14-Aug-2004 at 23:07
I'm so sorry you wasted your money on those ones. They where just awful. I remember the whole time reading them thinking why can't this guy get it right.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 14-Aug-2004 at 23:16

Right now I am reading the book The Aztecs by Nigel Davies

Gives a good acount on what their religion,  values,  government system and army was like



Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 15-Aug-2004 at 15:27

I'm currently reading Dune, by Frank Herbert.  A sci-fi novel, which I hardly ever read (I'm mostly limited to historical stuff), but it is EXCELLENT.



Posted By: JanusRook
Date Posted: 15-Aug-2004 at 19:24

Well I think I've got you all geeked up. Since my reading consists of my new Eberron DND setting book (Does that count as a book?).

As for novels I'm finishing up the darkness series by Harry Turtledove.

Also, I will have to say that I am one of those people that hasn't read the da Vinci Code.



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Economic Communist, Political Progressive, Social Conservative.

Unless otherwise noted source is wiki.


Posted By: Keltoi
Date Posted: 15-Aug-2004 at 19:55
The Picture of Dorian Gray and A Brave New World

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Cymru am Byth


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 15-Aug-2004 at 21:13

Currently I am reading Choke  and Wicca: a guide for the solitary practitioner

I am sorry that they have nothing to do with history.



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Posted By: Rebelsoul
Date Posted: 16-Aug-2004 at 06:58

I am reading several books right now. Baudolino by Uberto Eko is one, Ancient Athenians: Passion, Lust and Pleasure by a guy who's name I can't remember is the second and the newest Stephen King short stories collection is the third.

Kings stories are mildly entertaining (if you are in the beach, that is) but the other two are extremely interesting, I really recomend them. Also, I just finished "Carnage  and Culture" by Victor Davis Hanson, an excellent read (even though extremely controversial and kinda innacurate at several points)



Posted By: Rebelsoul
Date Posted: 16-Aug-2004 at 06:59
Originally posted by King Jeff 2

I'm currently reading Dune, by Frank Herbert.  A sci-fi novel, which I hardly ever read (I'm mostly limited to historical stuff), but it is EXCELLENT.

An extremely good book, one of the best in its kind.



Posted By: Yiannis
Date Posted: 16-Aug-2004 at 07:33

We're reading exactly the same books Rebelsoul! Apart for the King ones. When I'm at the beach I prefer to read Douglas Adams (and laugh out loud )

 



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The basis of a democratic state is liberty. Aristotle, Politics

Those that can give up essential liberty to obtain a temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. Benjamin Franklin


Posted By: Rebelsoul
Date Posted: 16-Aug-2004 at 07:45
Originally posted by Yiannis

We're reading exactly the same books Rebelsoul! Apart for the King ones. When I'm at the beach I prefer to read Douglas Adams (and laugh out loud )

 

 

Well, that's funny. Last year in my vacations I took with me (to read them all for the 5th or 6th time...) the whole trilogy (in four volumes   )  of the Hitchhikers guide... I tried not to laugh to loud though

You are reading the same books? Ain't they both fantastic? Baudolino is as full as every story of Eko (especially the name of the Rose... what a Behemoth of subtle meanings and hidden secrets... not to mention Fucault's Pendulum) with several layers and humangous riches of knowledge (and suggestions for further reading!) while the other book is probably the most interesting read about ancient history I've ever seen (naughty, naughty buggers them ancient Greeks )



Posted By: Yiannis
Date Posted: 16-Aug-2004 at 07:51

I have the tendency (actually it's a bad habit) of losing books. I lend them to friends never to take them back, lose them in moving etc... so very often when I want to read one book again I realize that I don't have it anymore and I have to re-buy it. That's what happened to the "Hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy" and I had to buy them again this summer!

And yes, our forefathers surelly knew how to enjoy life



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The basis of a democratic state is liberty. Aristotle, Politics

Those that can give up essential liberty to obtain a temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. Benjamin Franklin


Posted By: Dawn
Date Posted: 16-Aug-2004 at 10:53
My husbad wishes I would loose some of these books or at least get rid of them. Oh life with a person that doesn't read , they understand nothing


Posted By: Cornellia
Date Posted: 16-Aug-2004 at 12:09

Poor Dawn! that is a heavy cross to bear!

I've been told I have the only home in town that you need a library to get into.

 

LOL....so many books, so little time...........



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Felix qui potuit rerum cognoscere causas


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 16-Aug-2004 at 16:55

Originally posted by Dawn

My husbad wishes I would loose some of these books or at least get rid of them. Oh life with a person that doesn't read , they understand nothing

I know what you mean, poor dear. Although, I did finally trick my fiance into starting to read by buying him StarCraft and WarCraft books. Running out of those though :\

Da Vinci Code was very good, but there are non-fiction books that delve into the same theories with much more detail. I was reading one the other week, but the name is slipping my mind.

At the moment, I am desperatly trying to finish Dostoevski's Brothers Karamazov before school starts again. I knew I should have started earlier



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Posted By: vagabond
Date Posted: 16-Aug-2004 at 22:18

Good stuff everyone.  Wasn't a big fan of The Da Vinci Code - it's an ok thriller but the information is faaar too askew for my taste.

Baudolino was tough for me to get through - somewhat convoluted and I never identified with the characters - the lack of character development caused me to lose interest - Ecco's other works were better - Foucault's Pendulum got a bit lost in the plot - but was some fun material - I loved Name of the Rose.

Rise and Fall is always good - Gibbon is one of my fave raves.

Dune - also great - as is almost everything I have read by Herbert.

I'm currently working my way through material about the Confessing Church - the Lutheran group that opposed the German government's attempt at control of the church during the Nazi period - with the collected essays and sermons of Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Martin Niemoeller (From U boat to Pulpit gives some great images of life in the German Navy - Niemoeller was captain of a U boat during WW I). Both Niemoeller and Bonhoeffer were arrested by the Nazis - Niemoeller managed to survive.

Also currently reading Solomon Volkov's St.Petersburg: a cultural history  - discussing the influence of life in St. Petersburg on the various artists, composers, writers and poets who passed through there.  It's a bit dry. 



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In the time of your life, live - so that in that wonderous time you shall not add to the misery and sorrow of the world, but shall smile to the infinite delight and mystery of it. (Saroyan)


Posted By: Roughneck
Date Posted: 16-Aug-2004 at 22:27
[QUOTE=[aura]]

I know what you mean, poor dear. Although, I did finally trick my fiance into starting to read by buying him StarCraft and WarCraft books. Running out of those though :\

Try Battletech books.



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[IMG]http://img160.exs.cx/img160/7417/14678932fstore0pc.jpg">


Posted By: Rebelsoul
Date Posted: 17-Aug-2004 at 05:33

Originally posted by Dawn

My husbad wishes I would loose some of these books or at least get rid of them. Oh life with a person that doesn't read , they understand nothing

 

Try to lure him into reading more. Had the same problem with my wife, managed (after 3+ years of restless efforts) to drive her into reading... she finished 2 books and is underway a 3rd in our 10-day long vacations, so I must've done something here



Posted By: Rebelsoul
Date Posted: 17-Aug-2004 at 05:37
Originally posted by vagabond

Baudolino was tough for me to get through - somewhat convoluted and I never identified with the characters - the lack of character development caused me to lose interest - Ecco's other works were better - Foucault's Pendulum got a bit lost in the plot - but was some fun material - I loved Name of the Rose.

We do agree for the Name of the Rose (one of the best books I've ever read) but I find Baudolino equaly intriguing in several aspects (and there are fascinating characters here too) allthough not on the same level.  Foucaults Pendulum was really a tough reading - I had bought 5 books and rented half a dozen more while reading it, because it brought forth so many unanswered questions and so many elements begging for further explaination... marvelous, indeed.

 

BTW, shouldn't this lovely thread go to our newfound Literacy subforum?

 



Posted By: Roughneck
Date Posted: 17-Aug-2004 at 06:04
I think it could fit in either or.

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[IMG]http://img160.exs.cx/img160/7417/14678932fstore0pc.jpg">


Posted By: TJK
Date Posted: 17-Aug-2004 at 15:17
Right now I read the new Norman Davies  "Raising 1944" - very fresh and unconventional view on Warsaw Uprising in 1944. Except the historical works I like Kurt Vonnegut and Stanisław Lem books.


Posted By: Kalevipoeg
Date Posted: 17-Aug-2004 at 15:34

"Byzantine emperors: The emperors in purple"

"Introductory to islam"

"Napoleon"

"The black book of communism: Terror, repressions"

Tolstoi's "War and peace"

Those are at hand right now.

 



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There is nothing in the world more helpless and irresponsible than a man in the depths of an ether binge...


Posted By: TheDiplomat
Date Posted: 18-Aug-2004 at 05:53

The Abdulhamid Truth by Orhon Kologlu

Tolstoy's War and Peace

Introduction to Political Science by Munci Kapani (over 15.edition)

The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle



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ARDA:The best Turkish diplomat ever!



Posted By: cattus
Date Posted: 19-Aug-2004 at 00:26

TJk, where is Norman Davies from?

War and Peace is one tough nut to crack.



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Posted By: Master of Puppets
Date Posted: 19-Aug-2004 at 04:55

Impressive lists! At the moment I'm reading a translation of the Odyssee (finally I got to reading the real thing and not some modern version), which is a little bit old-fashioned and crappy, but whatever... I'll check out a better translation later on and read it all in Greek one day! I find it really great to read the real story and am trying to figure out if the events on Odysseus' trips can be seen as metaphores of a journey in his mind or something, but I find that kinda difficult (I only really started reading like this during the last few weeks thanks to a friend of mine who sorta pushed me to it with his MSN poetry sessions, before that my reading of classics was a bit more superficial).
I'm also reading Kafka's Der Prozess in German for the second time (I read it at school once), this time trying to truly comprehend it (which is probably just a difficult as for the Odyssee). I'm sorry to tell you I haven't even finished the first chapter yet

Fortunately our summer vacation in Scotland has given me a lot of time to (re)read books, so I re-read the Gilgamesh-epic (great, although some tablets are fragmentary which is rather annoying in my opinion) and re-read De Avonden [The Evenings] by Gerard Reve. It describes the last ten days of the year 1946 seen through the eyes of an adolescent who can't find any meaning in the pathetic life he and his relatives/friend are living. It is a great book and is generally considered as one of the peaks of post-war literature in the Netherlands. Highly recommended, if you find a translation, pick it up!
When I was in Inverness I bought The Oxford History of Byzantium, my first decent introduction into Byzantium, although I had learnt bits and pieces from reading parts of the Time Life World History Series (indeed great books, Cywr!).

By the way, like many others here I really enjoyed The Name of the Rose. Eco gives such a great impression of the Middle Ages and combines it with a fascinating detective story: great book. I've also seen the movie, but that one was a bit weaker because it obviously couldn't contain the richness the book contains.

EDIT:
I haven't read the Da Vinci Code either
Also, I must confess that the presence of the computer and upcoming study business are chipping a lot of time away that should have been spent on books



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Wherever I turn, there is Death.
The Epic of Gilgamesh; Tablet XI, line 245


Posted By: Dawn
Date Posted: 19-Aug-2004 at 14:00

 I agree impressive lists. Also about the name of the Rose . I finished The Devils Crown and am cought between finishing the others i've started or going on with the pile I want to start  but I think 1066 the year of conquest might win.

 

Edit:Cyrus or Invictus could you move this thread to the Lit forum if you have time? 

 



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Posted By: Master of Puppets
Date Posted: 20-Aug-2004 at 09:59
Yes, move it please

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Wherever I turn, there is Death.
The Epic of Gilgamesh; Tablet XI, line 245


Posted By: Styrbiorn
Date Posted: 20-Aug-2004 at 13:29
Originally posted by Jr_Capablanca

Hello!

Hi Mast! I`ve read Rde Orm as well, it`s quite entertaining ("...nr han kommit till besjungandet av mjlk och citronvatten..." ).

Rde Orm is one of the most enjoying books I've read. Nobody will understand what we are talking about though, since the English title is http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/000612609X/103-8313947-2282219?v=glance - The Long Ships . As a tidbit, the German title is Die Abenteuer des Rde Orm - somehow the translator missed that "Rde" is just a nick meaning "-the Red".

 

Currently I'm reading a book on statistics, and it isn't fun at all.



Posted By: Mosquito
Date Posted: 20-Aug-2004 at 14:51

Rde Orm is one of the most enjoying books I've read. Nobody will understand what we are talking about though, since the English title is http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/000612609X/103-8313947-2282219?v=glance - The Long Ships . As a tidbit, the German title is Die Abenteuer des Rde Orm - somehow the translator missed that "Rde" is just a nick meaning "-the Red".

I have also enjoyed Red Orm and i think i have read it for 3 or 4 times. Fortunatelly the translation into polish is excact and it is "Rudy Orm" what means the same as "Rde Orm". I wonder on how many languages it was translated.

Anyone knows if that author wrote more book about vikings?



Posted By: guarddiva87
Date Posted: 20-Aug-2004 at 15:36
At the moment, I'm reading The Bible in an effort to strenghten my faith. Also I'm reading my driver's ed book so that I can get my lisence. As far as fiction goes, I just finished reading Brave New World. That's a great book, one of my favorites. And, I've never read the Da Vinci code.

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Colorguard..to those who understand no explanation needed..To those who don't no explanation possible

Never frown...even when your sad, you never know when someone will fall in love with your smile


Posted By: Temujin
Date Posted: 22-Aug-2004 at 19:55
Originally posted by Dawn

Just finished a Canadian novel Jack Absulute by CC Humpries good book and about to start Butlerian Jihad (was it worth reading in your opinion Tamujin or just not bad ?)

well, i must say I always liked the idea of artificial intelligences taking over the Human world, and I liked the concept of the Butlerian Jihad as an outline of the original Dune. I always wanted to read a book about it, so I had high expectaitions of it and I must say I was overall very pleased, though they implemented one or two side-story too much and they messed up the end like in the previous books, but ptobably this is related to the fact that they wrote the book as an triology... the main plot humans vs. bots is excellent, it's no good vs evil, humans fight for both sides, both sides make use of Human slaves etc... the side-plot about Selim wormrider s also excellent, though it's only got a few chapters, I'm looking forward to read the machine crusade...

 

Originally posted by Master of Puppets

I'm also reading Kafka's Der Prozess in German for the second time (I read it at school once), this time trying to truly comprehend it (which is probably just a difficult as for the Odyssee). I'm sorry to tell you I haven't even finished the first chapter yet

Wow, that's most impressive! reading Kafka already makes you a superbrain, but then in a foreign language and even understand his weird stuff that's awesome!

 

BTW, War and peace is also one of the best books ever...I however never came around reading the brothers kamarasow or silent flows the Don...and I didn't finished reading Taras Bulba...



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Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 25-Aug-2004 at 15:33
Originally posted by guarddiva87

At the moment, I'm reading The Bible [...] As far as fiction goes,

I thought the Bible was fiction (excuse me for the easy joke, don't feel offended)

I discovered that the city in which I'm going to study (Groningen) has a very good bookshop.
I bought Pro Vaz de Caminha's account on the discovery of Brazil (finished it already) and the History of Mexico. I haven't finished that yet, although during my train journey back I've read the part between 1517 and 1914 (400 years, now that's what I call a long train journey)


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Posted By: Stewart
Date Posted: 25-Aug-2004 at 16:19

I'm reading Sun Tzu's Art of War in the mornings.

I'm reading Madame Blavatsky's Isis Unveiled in the afternoons.



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Posted By: TJK
Date Posted: 25-Aug-2004 at 16:51
TJk, where is Norman Davies from?

Norman Davies (born June 8, 1939) is a British historian and writer, famous for his studies and publications on Europe, UK and Poland.

He was born in Bolton, England. He studied in Grenoble, Oxford, Perugia, Sussex and Cracow (on Jagiellonian University). In 1973 he was honoured with a PhD title from the Jagiellonian University.

Norman Davies has held lectures in many countries (USA, Canada, Australia, Japan, China and in most European countries). From 1971 to 1996 he worked at the London University, School of Slavonic and Eastern European Studies, where in 1985 he became a Professor. He is currently Supernumerary Fellow at Wolfson College, Oxford.

He works with the BBC as well as other British and American magazines and newspapers like The Times, New York Review of Books and The Independent.

Norman Davies is a member of the Academia Scientiarum et Artium Europea in Salzburg and of the Polish Academy of Learning (PAU) in Cracow. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and the Royal Historical Society. He has received honorary PhD titles from the University of Maria Curie-Sklodowska in Lublin and the University of Gdańsk. He is an honorary citizen of Lublin and Cracow.

List of publications




Posted By: DSMyers1
Date Posted: 25-Aug-2004 at 18:16

I am reading...

message boards

Actually engineering textbooks, mostly.

Historically?

Not much at the moment.  Research in ancient history is on hold. (when is that other atlas coming in?.....)

 



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Posted By: Beylerbeyi
Date Posted: 26-Aug-2004 at 05:32

Eric Hobsbawm - The Age of Revolution.

Earlier this month I've read;

Noam Chomsky - Hegemony or Survival

George Monbiot - Age of Consent

Joseph Stiglitz - Globalisation and its Discontents



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Posted By: Tobodai
Date Posted: 26-Aug-2004 at 21:48
wow I am SO suprised by that reading list! What a shocker!!!!!!!!!

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"the people are nothing but a great beast...
I have learned to hold popular opinion of no value."
-Alexander Hamilton


Posted By: Dawn
Date Posted: 27-Aug-2004 at 11:39
Originally posted by Temujin

well, i must say I always liked the idea of artificial intelligences taking over the Human world, and I liked the concept of the Butlerian Jihad as an outline of the original Dune. I always wanted to read a book about it, so I had high expectaitions of it and I must say I was overall very pleased, though they implemented one or two side-story too much and they messed up the end like in the previous books, but ptobably this is related to the fact that they wrote the book as an triology... the main plot humans vs. bots is excellent, it's no good vs evil, humans fight for both sides, both sides make use of Human slaves etc... the side-plot about Selim wormrider s also excellent, though it's only got a few chapters, I'm looking forward to read the machine crusade...

[/QUOTE

Thanks for your imput. I'm now about half way through it,and finding it quite good just as your recommandation said.

Thanks for your imput. I'm now about half way through it,and finding it quite good just as your recommandation said.



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Posted By: Mangudai
Date Posted: 28-Aug-2004 at 14:35

Originally posted by Dawn

Every history buff reads something. So tell us what you are reading now.

I'm reading two books about the mongols - Jeremiah Curtins "The Mongols - a history" and David Morgan's "The mongols". I'm also reading a fantasy novel



Posted By: Dawn
Date Posted: 29-Aug-2004 at 19:11
Whats the fantasy novel? Anyone else here read fantasy?  

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Posted By: guarddiva87
Date Posted: 29-Aug-2004 at 19:39

Now I'm reading East of Eden by John Steinbeck. Its very good. I would recommend it to anybody.



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Colorguard..to those who understand no explanation needed..To those who don't no explanation possible

Never frown...even when your sad, you never know when someone will fall in love with your smile


Posted By: JanusRook
Date Posted: 29-Aug-2004 at 19:45

Whats the fantasy novel? Anyone else here read fantasy?  

I nearly read just fantasy, currently I'm reading (skimming actually) the Book of Lost Tales, you know one of those collections of Tolkiens writings.



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Economic Communist, Political Progressive, Social Conservative.

Unless otherwise noted source is wiki.


Posted By: Tobodai
Date Posted: 30-Aug-2004 at 00:13
Aside from Tolkien and the His Dark Materials series you will be very hard pressed to even find mediocre fantasy.  Its a shame in theory it would be my favorite genre but like other things like anime and pop music 95% of it sucks.

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"the people are nothing but a great beast...
I have learned to hold popular opinion of no value."
-Alexander Hamilton


Posted By: Gallipoli
Date Posted: 30-Aug-2004 at 03:21

Gemini Contenders by Robert Ludlum

Previous books: The Tristan Betrayal, The Prometheus Deception,The Altman Code, 1984....

The first three are by Robert Ludlum who made me read 500 days in 7 days. He is the BEST political-fiction-thriller of all time. In Prometheus Deception, the reader is deceived god knows how many times. Just dont pass away from this planet before reading these....



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Posted By: warlord
Date Posted: 30-Aug-2004 at 03:30

You guys are all lucky.

Currently, the only things I am reading are client business requirements.



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Posted By: Jagatai Khan
Date Posted: 31-Aug-2004 at 05:05
I began reading "Whom For The Bells Toll" by Ernest Hemingway.


Posted By: Gallipoli
Date Posted: 31-Aug-2004 at 09:58
Ernest is good...

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Posted By: Master of Puppets
Date Posted: 01-Sep-2004 at 07:20

I read FWTBT too, it's great!

"Wow, that's most impressive! reading Kafka already makes you a superbrain, but then in a foreign language and even understand his weird stuff that's awesome! "

Well, I said I was reading him, not that I understood him  Point is that his German isn't too difficult for somebody from the Netherlands, but to understand what he really means, that's a different matter...

I stopped in the sixth chapter and started all over again. I plan to take notes on each chapter I read and make plans of the rooms Kafka is describing. Kafka seems obsessed with rooms and the way they relate to each other, there must be something about them...
So far I only have a vague perception of the meaning of everything Kafka is writing in this book. I decided that the system of justice in the book can't represent a dictatorial state, as its supreme ruling body is invisible, which isn't the case in a dictatorial state. For the rest there are a few things that stand out: the stupidity of the employees, K. inability to really contact anybody, the importance of rooms...

ARGH!



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Wherever I turn, there is Death.
The Epic of Gilgamesh; Tablet XI, line 245


Posted By: Herodotus
Date Posted: 03-Sep-2004 at 14:39
The History of The English Speaking Peoples: Volume One

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"Dieu est un comdien jouant une assistance trop effraye de rire."
"God is a comedian playing to an audience too afraid to laugh."
-Francois Marie Arouet, Voltaire



Posted By: Dawn
Date Posted: 04-Sep-2004 at 15:17
The fall of Saxon England and 1066 the year of the conquest. plus an Artherian on (can't think of the name right know)

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Posted By: Tobodai
Date Posted: 05-Sep-2004 at 14:28
Is it just me, or do the women on this foru only like British and Roman history?

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"the people are nothing but a great beast...
I have learned to hold popular opinion of no value."
-Alexander Hamilton


Posted By: Dawn
Date Posted: 05-Sep-2004 at 16:13

Well ....I like medievil ...mostly British......I like Roman .....I like Scotland ..no wait thats British ...hummm.....you might be right.

 

No wait I like Egyptian tooo. That's not British or Roman. and Vikings  but mostly the others  



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Posted By: BattleGlory
Date Posted: 05-Sep-2004 at 17:36

Eesh, I'm reading so many books, and I've had to put them on hold while I'm finishing up my summer homework A People's History of the United States by Howard Zinn.  Thus Spake Zarathustra by Nietzsche.  The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky.  The Persian Boy by Mary Renault.  Imperial Hubris by "Anonymous".  Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle.  Paradise Lost by John Milton.  The Divine Comedy by Dante.  Still struggling through Peter Green's Alexander to ActiumThe Bible Unearthed by Israel Finkelstein and some other guy.  Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier.

MoP:  Do you have access to books in English?  If you do, I would suggest you try to pick up Robert Fagles' translation of the Odyssey, and the Iliad too.

so many books, so little time

I have a shirt that says that, haha.

Aside from Tolkien and the His Dark Materials series you will be very hard pressed to even find mediocre fantasy.

Have you tried Robert Jordan's "Wheel of Time" series?



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~If you don't know history, you don't know anything.
~Time can change me, but I can't change time.


Posted By: Jalisco Lancer
Date Posted: 06-Sep-2004 at 01:11

 

  Santa Anna: the seductor of the Father Land from Enrique Serna.



Posted By: Beylerbeyi
Date Posted: 06-Sep-2004 at 02:53

Originally posted by Master of Puppets


I stopped in the sixth chapter and started all over again. I plan to take notes on each chapter I read and make plans of the rooms Kafka is describing. Kafka seems obsessed with rooms and the way they relate to each other, there must be something about them...

Obsession about rooms... Interesting observation there. Here's a quote from the Kafka short-story The Burrow, which is written from the POV of a mole:

When I stand in the Castle Keep surrounded by my piled-up stores, surveying the ten passages which begin there, raised and sunken passages, vertical and rounded passages, wide and narrow passages, as the general plan dictates, and all alike still and empty, ready by their various routes to conduct me to all the other rooms, which are also still and empty, -then I know that this is my castle that I have wrested from the refractory soil with tooth and claw, with pounding and hammering blows, my castle which can never belong to anyone else, and is so essentially mine that I can calmly accept in it even my enemy's mortal stroke at the final hour, for my blood will ebb away here in my own soil and will not be lost.

And a parable from the short story Great Wall of China;

There is a parable that describes this situation very well: The Emperor, so it runs, has sent a message to you, the humble subject, the insignificant shadow cowering in the remotest distance before the imperial sun; the Emperor from his death-bed has sent a message to you alone. He has commanded the messenger to kneel down by the bed, and has whispered the message to him; so much store did he lay on it that he ordered the messenger to whisper it back to his ear again. Then by a nod of the head he has confirmed that it is right. Yes, before the assembled spectators of his death- all the obstructing walls have been broken down, and on the spacious and loftily mounting open staircases stand in a ring the great princes of the Empire- before all these he has delivered his message. The messenger immediately sets out on his journey; a powerful, an indefatigable man; now pushing with his right arm, now with his left, he cleaves a way for himself through the throng; if he encounters resistance he points to his breast, where the symbol of the sun glitters; the way, too, is made easier for him than it would be for any other man. But the multitudes are so vast; their numbers have no end. If he could reach the open fields how fast he would fly, and soon doubtless you would hear the welcome hammering of his fists on your door. But instead how vainly does he wear out his strength; still he is only making his way through the chambers of the innermost palace; never will he get to the end of them; and if he succeeded in that nothing would be gained; he must fight his way next down the stairs; and if he succeeded in that nothing would be gained; the courts would still have to be crossed; and after the courts the second outer palace; and once more stairs and courts; and once more another palace; and so on for thousands of years; and if at last he should burst through the outermost gate- but never, never can that happen- the imperial capital would lie before him, the centre of the world, crammed to bursting with its own refuse. Nobody could fight his way through here even with a message from a dead man. -But you sit at your window when evening falls and dream it to yourself.

Both show an interest in architecture.



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Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 07-Sep-2004 at 03:36
The Arabs in History by Bernard Lewis.  Ive been reading like a page at a time for the past year, i pick it up like once a week or something.  I dont read many books, but I guess you could say im "reading" this one right now

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Posted By: Abyssmal Fiend
Date Posted: 08-Sep-2004 at 11:51

Reading..

The Second Demonwars Saga by Bob Salvatore, currently on the last book "Immortals".

And for my history report, Inside the Third Reich by Albert Speer... again.



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Di! Ecce hora! Uxor mea me necabit!


Posted By: Kalevipoeg
Date Posted: 09-Sep-2004 at 15:21
I started reading "Between war and peace: the Estonain defense policies before 1940."

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There is nothing in the world more helpless and irresponsible than a man in the depths of an ether binge...


Posted By: Temujin
Date Posted: 10-Sep-2004 at 13:22
bah, i'm finished with the osprey book about the persian army (560-330 BC), not only the plates were ugly, the text was horrible, basicaly everyhting is guesswork...

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Posted By: Master of Puppets
Date Posted: 13-Sep-2004 at 14:42

"MoP:  Do you have access to books in English?  If you do, I would suggest you try to pick up Robert Fagles' translation of the Odyssey, and the Iliad too."

Actually, I recently ordered Fagles' translation of Aischulos's Oresteia (I read that his translations were very readable and accurate) and translations of the Odyssey and Iliad into Dutch in hexameters. I'll probably pick up Fagles' version too, once, especially if I'll like his translation of the Oresteia.

Beylerbeyi, those quotes were really interesting and shed some more light on Kafka, thanks a lot! I ordered his collected works recently (8 volumes in German) so I don't have to lend Kafka from the library anymore and can spend the rest of my life reading him and never get out of the palace!



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Wherever I turn, there is Death.
The Epic of Gilgamesh; Tablet XI, line 245


Posted By: faram
Date Posted: 16-Sep-2004 at 16:50
Now I'm reading "Mendizabal"  by Galds


Posted By: Kubrat
Date Posted: 17-Sep-2004 at 21:30
Originally posted by Tobodai

Aside from Tolkien and the His Dark Materials series you will be very hard pressed to even find mediocre fantasy.  Its a shame in theory it would be my favorite genre but like other things like anime and pop music 95% of it sucks.


Hmm, maybe.  Have you tried Shadow War Chronicles or the Majipoor series?  Or even C.S. Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia?

I am reading Valentine Pontifex by Robert Silverberg.


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Hell is empty and all the devils are here.
-William Shakespeare


Posted By: Evildoer
Date Posted: 08-Oct-2004 at 13:18
Road to Wigan Pier by George Orwell.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 10-Oct-2004 at 16:16
Currently I'm reading 'De kleine vrede in de Grote Oorlog' (The little peace in the Great War) from Michael Jrgs. It's a Dutch translation of a German book. It's about the spontaneous truces on the Western Front during Chrismas 1914. Really a moving story.

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Posted By: Mosquito
Date Posted: 10-Oct-2004 at 17:25

Right now im reading the book of Andrzej Sapkowski "Bozy wojownicy" (can translate it into english as "Gods wariors" or "Divine Wariors"). It is a second book of story after "Narenturm".

Authour is quite famous in Poland as a fantasy wirtter but his books Narrenturm and God's Wariors are very different than his other books.

At the first look the book seems to be a historic novel. Action takes place in the 15th century during hussite wars. The historic backrground is really good and i didnt find any mistakes so far. But well, its hard to say that it is historic book because it has its second bottom. Medieval ages were famous for burning witches and wizzards and in these books they really exists. So in the completelly historical world we find a group of people who are usually the professors or students of medieval european universities but are in the same time they are secretelly practicing magic and alchemy and often they can be found behind the real historical events and battles. Right now iv read 1/5 of the book and find it really interesting. The Pope called crusade against Czech heretics under the command of Henri de Beaufort which invaded Bohemia and was cut on pieces by the hussite army.  Really interesting story.



Posted By: Tobodai
Date Posted: 10-Oct-2004 at 20:14
I just finished my Saladin biography and now are reading A Consise History of Russia and the Memoirs of Babur the Tiger both at once!

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"the people are nothing but a great beast...
I have learned to hold popular opinion of no value."
-Alexander Hamilton


Posted By: TheDiplomat
Date Posted: 11-Oct-2004 at 13:33

Right now i am reading 3 books:

-Henry Kissenger,Diplomacy

-Oral Sander,Political History from Middle Ages to 1918

-Tayyar Ari,International Relations and Foreign Policy

 



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ARDA:The best Turkish diplomat ever!



Posted By: Abyssmal Fiend
Date Posted: 12-Oct-2004 at 15:48

Two, right now.

Warriors of God: A book about Saladin and Richard the Lionhearted during the Crusades.

The Assassination of Heydrich: Assassination attempt on Reinhardt Heydrich during WWII.



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Di! Ecce hora! Uxor mea me necabit!


Posted By: Master of Puppets
Date Posted: 14-Oct-2004 at 09:50

Just read:

Dutch:
Harry Mulisch, De Procedure (interesting and quite good, but not as brilliant as some of his other works)
Willem Frederik Hermans, Nooit Meer Slapen (a masterpiece of black existentialism)

Now reading:

In Dutch:
Vergilius, Aeneis (no explanation needed)
Harry Mulisch, Het Stenen Bruidsbed (brilliant, quite difficult)

In French:
Camus, L'tranger (quite good so far)

In German:
Rdiger Safranski, Nietzsche, Biographie Seines Denken (very interesting)

In Greek (with the aid of a translation into German):
Aischulos, Oresteia (not far enough to cast a judgement so far)



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Wherever I turn, there is Death.
The Epic of Gilgamesh; Tablet XI, line 245


Posted By: vagabond
Date Posted: 24-Oct-2004 at 12:14

Am still working on Eberhard Bethge's biography of Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Bonhoeffer's "Ethics".  Slow going.

For light reading - have just finished "The Secret Life of Bees" - kind of a feel good story about the tribulations of a teen aged girl in the American south during the Civil Rights campaigns.  Good but predictable.

More interesting was "Life of Pi" - about the teenaged son of an Indian zookeeper who leaves the subcontinent with his family and all the animals to start a new life in Canada.  Their ship sinks and the boy ends up in a lifeboat with a wounded zebra, an orangutan, a hyena and a tiger.  I'm not convinced that it lives up to the jacket's promise of "the soul sustaining power of fiction" but it's a very good read.



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In the time of your life, live - so that in that wonderous time you shall not add to the misery and sorrow of the world, but shall smile to the infinite delight and mystery of it. (Saroyan)


Posted By: Jagatai Khan
Date Posted: 30-Oct-2004 at 10:47

I could not read Whom for the Bells toll,it bored me.

I am now reading "Memleket Hikayeleri" by Refik Halit Karay.



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Posted By: Dawn
Date Posted: 31-Oct-2004 at 10:05
"Cleopatra" and "Julius Caesar" both by Grant. Kind of intesting to read them both at the same time. couple chapters from one then the other. sort of expands the time frames of each book. 

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Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 25-Nov-2004 at 20:06

I'm reading two books currently, and both are excellent and highly recommended.

The first book I'm reading is "The Struggle for Mastery: Britian 1066-1284", by David Carpenter. So far (I'm only about 163 pages in), it gives an entertaining and informative account of the demographics and economics of the peoples of Britian before the Norman Conquest. A good account of William the Conqueror's invasion and consolidation of England is given, as well as the politics of Wales at that time and the ambitions of the Scottish Kings. The book also has a good narrative of the reigns of William Rufus and Henry I, and their attempts and ultimate success at forging and defending a cross Channel state. So far, I would highly recommend the book. It is kind of confusing at times though, for it does not give much background of to many of the historical figures introduced.

The other book I'm reading concurrently is "The Birth of Vietnam", by Kieth Weller Taylor. I would also highly recommend this book, as it is very entertaining and informative as well, even though I have not finished this book either (only about 123 pages in). It can be read in many ways: first and foremost, it's a book of the forging of the Vietnamese identity and their struggles for independence from China from the third century B.C. to the tenth century A.D. A good account of the founding myths of Vietnam and their effect of the Vietnamese national identity is given. Also, the effect of various early independence leaders on the development of Vietnamese independence movements is given. It can also be read as an account of the Chinese conquest and provinicial life and politics in a remote border region of Chinese civilization. There's also some information of the various kingdoms of South East Asia and Southern China before and after the Chinese invasions.



Posted By: Dawn
Date Posted: 25-Nov-2004 at 21:09

"The Struggle for Mastery: Britian 1066-1284",

sounds like it's right up my ally. I'll have to take a look for it. Thanks



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Posted By: Temujin
Date Posted: 26-Nov-2004 at 13:24
i've read half of Erik Hildigners book about Steppe warfare, but I had to quit because it's so bad. instead I'm reading now the new osprey book about Steppe warfare which is really awesome so far....

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Posted By: babyblue
Date Posted: 27-Nov-2004 at 10:50
         had a browse through Kinokuniya today...a very very big book shop in Sydney...bought myself a book called Thunder out of China, by Theodore H. White and Annalee Jacoby. Should keep me at home more for the comming week...hopefully.

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Posted By: vagabond
Date Posted: 28-Nov-2004 at 14:30
Finally worked my way through Eberhard Bethge's biography of Dietrich Bonhoeffer - very slow going.  Have gone on to Alexander Adams biography of Sitting Bull.  It's not so much a biography as a survey of the Plain's Indian Wars - with an attempt at focusing on Sitting Bull's role.  As there were so few writtne records of the period from an Indian point of view - he seems to be doing a good job of balancing the perspectives.  I enjoyed "Moon of Popping Trees" by Rex Smith much more - it is the best, most well balanced short account of the events on the Plains in that period that I have seen.

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In the time of your life, live - so that in that wonderous time you shall not add to the misery and sorrow of the world, but shall smile to the infinite delight and mystery of it. (Saroyan)


Posted By: Dawn
Date Posted: 29-Nov-2004 at 11:12
Vagabond my freind stop reading all those books about indians or you will turn into the most dreaded creature - A Canadian elementry school Social studies teacher.

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Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 23-Dec-2004 at 19:26
I recently read 'For the power and the glory' by Graham Greene. Really a good novel. It's the third book of Greene I read (the others were The Comedians and Monsignor Quixote). I'm certainly going to read more Greene. 

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Posted By: Temujin
Date Posted: 24-Dec-2004 at 16:40
the armies of Bactria 700 BC - 450 AD pretty good so far, though I spotted a few mistakes yet. parallely I'm readign bits of the book i got myself fro christmas, Charge! great Cavalry charges of the Napoleonic wars. aslo looks pretty neat so far, though it lacks the polish Chevaux-legers charge at Somosierra and the capture of that Prussian fortress by Lasalle for some reason...

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Posted By: Dawn
Date Posted: 04-Jan-2005 at 14:11

incouraged by recent discusions of King Arthur I took to reading (or rescaning) all the non fiction books I could lay my hands on about the topic- about 12 of them at the moment.  



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Posted By: Murph
Date Posted: 06-Jan-2005 at 19:21
for school right now i'm reading j.d. salinger's nine stories....i've read 4 of the nine, and i've yet to comprehend one of them

i realize that salinger's ideas and meanings are out there, but i cant find them

if anyone's read the book and understand the meanings behind any of the stories your help would be greatly appreciated


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