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Islamic poetry

Printed From: History Community ~ All Empires
Category: Scholarly Pursuits
Forum Name: Literary Pursuits
Forum Discription: all things relating to the written word
URL: http://www.allempires.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=2757
Printed Date: 29-Nov-2021 at 19:05
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Topic: Islamic poetry
Posted By: eaglecap
Subject: Islamic poetry
Date Posted: 29-Mar-2005 at 13:01
I know Islam has made some good contributions to history, including literature.

I have read some Islamic poetry but off hand my mind is blank-any contributions!!!



Replies:
Posted By: Antiochus
Date Posted: 29-Mar-2005 at 13:09

Arabic poetry for start...

http://www.admin.northpark.edu/dkoeller/Classes/Sources/ArabPoetry.html - http://www.admin.northpark.edu/dkoeller/Classes/Sources/Arab Poetry.html



Posted By: eaglecap
Date Posted: 29-Mar-2005 at 19:41
I have read the Prophet and it is one of my favorite literary pieces.

Then Almitra spoke again and said, "And what of Marriage, master?"

And he answered saying:

You were born together, and together you shall be forevermore.

You shall be together when white wings of death scatter your days.

Aye, you shall be together even in the silent memory of God.

But let there be spaces in your togetherness,

And let the winds of the heavens dance between you.

Love one another but make not a bond of love:

Let it rather be a moving sea between the shores of your souls.

Fill each other's cup but drink not from one cup.

Give one another of your bread but eat not from the same loaf.

Sing and dance together and be joyous, but let each one of you be alone,

Even as the strings of a lute are alone though they quiver with the same music.

Give your hearts, but not into each other's keeping.

For only the hand of Life can contain your hearts.

And stand together, yet not too near together:

For the pillars of the temple stand apart,

And the oak tree and the cypress grow not in each other's shadow.

http://www.columbia.edu/~gm84/gibran3.html


Posted By: vagabond
Date Posted: 04-Apr-2005 at 16:55

Gibran is probably the best known in the west - look for Rumi and Hafez as well - one of my favorite Rumi pieces

Let go of your worries and be completely clear-hearted,
like the face of a mirror that contains no images.
If you want a clear mirror, behold yourself
and see the shameless truth, which the mirror reflects.
If metal can be polished to a mirror-like finish,
what polishing might the mirror of the heart require?
Between the mirror and the heart is this single difference:
the heart conceals secrets, while the mirror does not.

Cyrus had corrected the translation of one of these at one point on the old site - I hope this is the right version.



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In the time of your life, live - so that in that wonderous time you shall not add to the misery and sorrow of the world, but shall smile to the infinite delight and mystery of it. (Saroyan)


Posted By: ramin
Date Posted: 04-Apr-2005 at 17:12
I'm sorry but the last one is in Persian not Arabic. and obviously not Islamic (They say Rumi was gay!)

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"I won't laugh if a philosophy halves the moon"


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 05-Apr-2005 at 16:01

Originally posted by ramin

I'm sorry but the last one is in Persian not Arabic. and obviously not Islamic (They say Rumi was gay!)

Mevlana Celaleddin Rumi was Turkish and he was a man.

I think Ottoman "Divan Edebiyatý" has the best examples of Islamic literature and poetry. It uses a language synthesis of Turkish, Arabic and Persian. I dont understand anything from it because of the enormous number of foreign words and usage in it, but it sounds pretty cool...



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Posted By: Beylerbeyi
Date Posted: 06-Apr-2005 at 12:01

So, 'Islamic poetry' is the latest manifestation of the muddy thinking process rampart in the contemporary West.

How much sense would it make if someone asked what 'Christian poetry' is like? You'd ask, 'which language do you have in mind?' So, Arabic poetry, Persian poetry, Turkish poetry exist, 'Islamic poetry' does not exist. Unless, of course, you were talking about religious poetry (Sufi poetry, etc.) which is actually about religion. But you unfortunately aren't.



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Posted By: Cywr
Date Posted: 07-Apr-2005 at 13:29
Funny thing is, you have muslims here who speak in such terms, thus even things that aren't even exclusivly Islamic, become defacto Islamic.

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Arrrgh!!"


Posted By: vagabond
Date Posted: 07-Apr-2005 at 17:42

Ramin - You seem to feel that - to be considered Islamic - literature must be written in Arabic?  I disagree - there is a long tradition of literature in several countries that do not use Arabic as a principle language - Persia and Turkey have already been mentioned, Mogul literature is another example.  A quick web search also found Islamic poetry and literature being written today in languages as diverse as Swahili and bahasa Indonesia.

Beylerbeyi - you are seeing monsters under the bed again.  In a few short sentences you have hijacked a thread with the potential to expose folks to some of the best, and least known literature that the world has to offer and turned the discussion into a diatribe against the "evil West"?  What a positive and productive outlook.

In the english language the convention is to use the term Islamic as an adjective describing both the cultures and the products of the cultures of the period from the growth of Islam through the decline of the Ottoman Empire - hence - "Islamic Art"  "Islamic Literature" and yes - even here at AE, the subcategory "Islamic World". 

An article from Cornell and a syllabus with links from an old Berkeley course in World Civilization.

http://www.library.cornell.edu/colldev/mideast/islamlit.htm - http://www.library.cornell.edu/colldev/mideast/islamlit.htm

http://www-learning.berkeley.edu/wciv/ugis55a/readings/islam.html - http://www-learning.berkeley.edu/wciv/ugis55a/readings/islam .html

 



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In the time of your life, live - so that in that wonderous time you shall not add to the misery and sorrow of the world, but shall smile to the infinite delight and mystery of it. (Saroyan)


Posted By: Cywr
Date Posted: 07-Apr-2005 at 17:45
He is making a legitimate point IMHO, even if it perhaps doesn't belong in this thread. There are funny things in everyday language that we take for granted and think nothing of, but we should question.

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Arrrgh!!"


Posted By: ramin
Date Posted: 08-Apr-2005 at 01:05
Originally posted by Oguzoglu

Originally posted by ramin

I'm sorry but the last one is in Persian not Arabic. and obviously not Islamic (They say Rumi was gay!)

Mevlana Celaleddin Rumi was Turkish and he was a man.

check his forum_posts.asp?TID=1668&KW=poetry&TPN=2 - biography again.
He was a man who fell in love with his preceptor and inspiration Shams-al-din Tabrizi. He titled his famous Masnavis after him "Divan-E Shams".

Originally posted by vagabond

Ramin - You seem to feel that - to be considered Islamic - literature must be written in Arabic?
No-no!... I didn’t say that, I was just talking "specifically" about Rumi and his Divan-E Shams. However, his other work (Masnavi Manavi) which is dervish spiritual poetry, can interpreted as an islamic literature.


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"I won't laugh if a philosophy halves the moon"


Posted By: Beylerbeyi
Date Posted: 08-Apr-2005 at 08:31

Beylerbeyi - you are seeing monsters under the bed again.  In a few short sentences you have hijacked a thread with the potential to expose folks to some of the best, and least known literature that the world has to offer and turned the discussion into a diatribe against the "evil West"?  What a positive and productive outlook.

I respect your point and intent, but I don't agree with your assessment of what's positive and productive. The reason is, by agreeing with this nonsense you are propagating it. 

In the english language the convention is to use the term Islamic as an adjective describing both the cultures and the products of the cultures of the period from the growth of Islam through the decline of the Ottoman Empire - hence - "Islamic Art"  "Islamic Literature" and yes - even here at AE, the subcategory "Islamic World".

Your convention is nonsense in many ways. 'Islamic World' as a pre-modern term is indeed meaningful. One can similarly talk about 'Christendom', and make sense. 'Islamic art' is semi-meaningful, because Islam, being a iconoclastic religion, restricts certain visual art forms, causing an increase of interest in others. 'Islamic literature' is, on the other hand, is quite meningless, unless you are talking about literature about Islam itself. It makes far more sense to discuss poetry in terms of language. Also, since you use the term 'Islamic' as relating to politics and culture as distinct from religion, as in 'Islamic poetry produced by cultures from the growth of Islam to the decline of the Ottoman Empire', I wish you good luck in convincing the Greeks and Bulgarians and Serbs and many others that their poetry under the Ottomans was 'Islamic'.  

He is making a legitimate point IMHO, even if it perhaps doesn't belong in this thread.

Thank you. And it belongs in this thread, which is called 'Islamic poetry'.   

Funny thing is, you have muslims here who speak in such terms, thus even things that aren't even exclusivly Islamic, become defacto Islamic.

Very true. This is because 'islamism' appeared as a reaction to western orientalism, which lumps the muslims from all over the planet into one fictitious category. Anti-western (and at the time anti-imperialist) traditionalists actually liked the idea and adopted it. This is a modern phenomenon.



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Posted By: MengTzu
Date Posted: 12-May-2005 at 04:23
Any Sufi literature?


Posted By: ramin
Date Posted: 18-May-2005 at 01:48
Mulana

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"I won't laugh if a philosophy halves the moon"


Posted By: Behi
Date Posted: 27-May-2005 at 10:26
Originally posted by Oguzoglu


Mevlana Celaleddin Rumi was Turkish and he was a man.

I think Ottoman "Divan Edebiyatý" has the best examples of Islamic literature and poetry. It uses a language synthesis of Turkish, Arabic and Persian. I dont understand anything from it because of the enormous number of foreign words and usage in it, but it sounds pretty cool...

I don't Understand too why do you think He was Turk , If he was, Why he didn't use turkish Language, & why there is no turkish word in his poems &....

You know him turk because his shrine located at Ghonie

Molana was Aryan as me & all of his compatriot & whose that his book was elected as most favorite book in US few months ago
 



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Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 24-Mar-2012 at 01:43
Rabia al Adawiyya

My Greatest Need is You

Your hope in my heart is the rarest treasure
Your Name on my tongue is the sweetest word
My choicest hours
Are the hours I spend with You --
O Allah, I can't live in this world
Without remembering You--
How can I endure the next world
Without seeing Your face?
I am a stranger in Your country
And lonely among Your worshippers:
This is the substance of my complaint.




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Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 25-Mar-2012 at 21:20
Rabia al Adawiyya:


Dream Fable

I saw myself in a wide green garden, more beautiful than I could begin to understand. In this garden was a young girl. I said to her, "How wonderful this place is!"

"Would you like to see a place even more wonderful than this?" she asked.

"Oh yes," I answered. Then taking me by the hand, she led me on until we came to a magnificent palace, like nothing that was ever seen by human eyes. The young girl knocked on the door, and someone opened it. Immediately both of us were flooded with light.

Only Allah knows the inner meaning of the maidens we saw living there. Each one carried in her hand a serving-tray filled with light. The young girl asked the maidens where they were going, and they answered her, "We are looking for someone who was drowned in the sea, and so became a martyr. She never slept at night, not one wink! We are going to rub funeral spices on her body."

"Then rub some on my friend here," the young girl said.

"Once upon a time," said the maidens, "part of this spice and the fragrance of it clung to her body -- but then she shied away."

Quickly the young girl let go of my hand, turned, and said to me:

"Your prayers are your light;
Your devotion is your strength;
Sleep is the enemy of both.
Your life is the only opportunity that life can give you.
If you ignore it, if you waste it,
You will only turn to dust."

Then the young girl disappeared.




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Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 27-Mar-2012 at 01:05
Rabbia al Adawiyya:

Reality

In love, nothing exists between heart and heart.
Speech is born out of longing,
True description from the real taste.
The one who tastes, knows;
the one who explains, lies.
How can you describe the true form of Something
In whose presence you are blotted out?
And in whose being you still exist?
And who lives as a sign for your journey?




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Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 28-Mar-2012 at 00:21
Rabbia al Adawiyya:

My Beloved

My peace, O my brothers and sisters, is my solitude,
And my Beloved is with me always,
For His love I can find no substitute,
And His love is the test for me among mortal beings,
Whenever His Beauty I may contemplate,
He is my "mihrab", towards Him is my "qiblah"
If I die of love, before completing satisfaction,
Alas, for my anxiety in the world, alas for my distress,
O Healer (of souls) the heart feeds upon its desire,
The striving after union with Thee has healed my soul,
O my Joy and my Life abidingly,
You were the source of my life and from Thee also came my ecstasy.
I have separated myself from all created beings,
My hope is for union with Thee, for that is the goal of my desire.




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Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 29-Mar-2012 at 23:35
Sa'di Shirazi

Who is the Real Seeker?

I will not say, O Brother, what the spiritual concert is, 
Until I know who is listening to it.

If he begins his flight from the tower of the spirit.  
The Angels will not keep up with his soaring.

But if he be a man of error, vanity and play,
The Shaytan will grow more powerful in his brain.

The Rose is torn apart by the morning breeze,
But not the log; for it can only be split by an ax.

The world feeds on music, drunkenness and rivalry.
But what does the blind man see in a mirror?




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Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 02-Apr-2012 at 14:18
Allahma Iqbal

Science and Faith

Once Science said to Faith:

"My eye can see all that is in this world;
The Entire world is within my net.
I am only concerned with material things,
What have I to do with spiritual matters?
I can strike a thousand melodies,
And openly proclaim all the secrets that I learn."

Faith said:

"With your magic even the waves in the sea are set ablaze,
You can pollute the atmosphere with foul, poisonous gases.
When you associated with me, you were light,
When you broke off from me, your light became fire.
You were of Divine origin, 
But you have been caught in the clutches of Shaytan.
Come, make this wasteland a garden once again.
Borrow from me a little of my ecstasy,
And in the world set up a paradise.
From the day of creation we have been associates,
We are the low and high tunes of the same melody."






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Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 05-Apr-2012 at 01:17
Muhyiddin ibn Arabi

My Journey

I withdrew with He whom I love passionately, and there was no one but us,
for if there had been another than me, the retreat would not have been one.

When I imposed on my soul the conditions of her seclusion,
the souls of the creatures all at once became her slaves!

But if there were not in her an Other than herself,
my soul would have made a gift of herself to He who overwhelms her with His gifts.




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Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 06-Apr-2012 at 02:20
Muhyiddin Ibn Arabi

An Ocean without Shore

I marveled at an Ocean without shore,
and at a Shore that did not have an ocean;
And at a Morning Light without darkness,
and at a Night that was without daybreak;
And then a Sphere with no locality
known to either fool or learned scholar;
And at an azure Dome raised over the earth,
circulating 'round its center -- Compulsion;
And at a rich Earth without o'er-arching vault
and no specific location, the Secret concealed . . . .

I courted a Secret which existence did not alter;
for it was asked of me: "Has Thought enchanted you?"
-- To which I replied: "I have no power over that;
I counsel you: Be patient with it while you live.
But, truly, if Thought becomes established
in my mind, the embers kindle into flame,
And everything is given up to fire
the like of which was never seen before!"
And it was said to me: "He does not pluck a flower
who calls himself with courtesy 'Freeborn'."
"He who woos the belle femme in her boudoir, love-beguiled,
will never deem the bridal-price too high!"

I gave her the dower and was given her in marriage
throughout the night until the break of Dawn --
But other than Myself I did not find. -- Rather,
that One whom I married -- may his affair be known:
For added to the Sun's measure of light
are the radiant New Moon and shining Stars;
Like Time, dispraised - though the Prophet (Blessings on him!)
had once declared of your Lord that He is Time.




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Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 10-Apr-2012 at 02:35
Ibn Arabi

Fire

O Marvel! a garden amidst the flames.
My heart has become capable of every form:
it is a pasture for gazelles and a convent for Christian monks,
and a temple for idols and the pilgrim's Ka'bah,
and the tables of the Torah and the book of the Qur'an.
I follow the religion of Love: whatever way Love's camels take,
that is my religion and my faith.




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Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 12-Apr-2012 at 03:22
Ibn Arabi

The Invitation

Approach the dwelling place of the dear ones who have taken covenants -
may clouds of incessant rain pour upon it!
And breathe the scent of the wind over against their land, in desire that
the sweet airs may tell thee where they are.
I know that they encamped at the banded tree of Idam, where the arar plants
grow and the shih and the katam.




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Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 08-May-2012 at 02:03
Ibn Arabi

From: The Fabulous Gryphon ('Anqâ' Mughrib)

Since that which is true in Vision is a major part of Prophecy, we swore our belief in what such Vision confers and conveys of the Favors of the Real (Praised be He!).  For I entered the House of Lights and let down the curtains and the veils, jealously protective of the harem. Then, while I was conversing intimately with the Real in His presence, the attraction of a Mighty One attracted me to him, and the Real installed me in the Station of the 'Ocean' -- the waves of which heave and overflow, one entering into another and rising aloft. And I was in a State which no one can know but he who has borne it, and no one describe but he who has seen it, as has been said:

No one knows Desire except for one who bears it,
nor fervent Longing, but he who suffers from it.




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Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 09-May-2012 at 01:24
Ibn Arabi

Reality

They placed the palaquins
on the finest workhorse camel mares,
and within their embroidered canopies
full moons and marbled statuettes.

They promised my heart
they'd return
but what are the promises of a soft girl
but illusions.

They beckoned goodbye,
fingertips dyed with henna,
set tears scattering
and stoked the fire.

They turned
back toward Yemen,
seeking Khawarnaq
then Sadir,

Damn it! I called
as they left.
They answered:
If you want to cry damn it,

Why settle for
a single, lonely damn?
Damn it, damn it,
Damn it all over!

Easy now,
dove of the thorn berry thicket,
her leaving
has sharpened your cry.

Your coo, dove,
stirs the lover
and inflames
the already burning,
Melts the heart,
compounds our longing
and our sigh

Death hovers
over a dove that coos.
We beg of him
a stay.

Maybe a breath
from the East wind
from Hajir
will bring us clouds of rain.

You who pasture the stars
be my drinking companion!
and you, awake-all-night lightning watcher,
my night friend!

And you who'd rather
sleep the night away
before you die
you live entombed

If you'd only loved
a bravesouled beauty
you'd have found in her what you desired
and been satisfied.
You'd be sharing with the belles
intimate drink,
speaking secrets to the sun, and to the moon
whispering nothing




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Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 12-Aug-2012 at 04:48

Woman of Mint

by http://www.poetrytranslation.org/poets/Fatena_Al-Gharra - Fatena Al-Gharra

She hauls her desire from the anguish of thorns,
whispering: sunlight abides in you.
She is followed by the aroma of a fleeting moment
which she ignites with the perfume of Spring.
Not once does she gasp for breath.
Only wild nettle sates her desire:
his hair alone will make her easy.

His presence delights the scenery.
He populates vacancy.
He takes the pure mint with the force of his leaves,
scarring her deep inside.
His sting... his victory.
Her breath stopped, as if for eternity.
Then he tickles her elbow with his sting.



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Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 28-Oct-2012 at 13:11
Sufi poetry - a poem by Hazrat Amir Hosraw

I said: 'What is bright like the moon?'
He said: 'The cheek of Mine'.

I said: "What is sweeter than sugar?'
He said: 'The talk of Mine'.

I said: 'What of the ways of the lover?'
He said: 'It should be faithfulness'.

I said: 'Do not show cruelty'.
He said: 'It is the work of Mine'.

I said: 'What is death for a lover?'
He said:'Pangs of My separation'.

I said: 'What is the cure for life?'
He said: 'The envy of My beauty'.

I said: 'What puts swiftness to shame?'
He said: 'The speed of Mine'.

I said: 'Are you a beautiful damsel or fairy?'
He said: 'I am the King of the beautiful'.

I said: 'What of humble Khusraw?'
He said: 'He is a lover of Mine'.



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