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World Folk/Traditional/Roots Music

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Topic: World Folk/Traditional/Roots Music
Posted By: King Kang of Mu
Subject: World Folk/Traditional/Roots Music
Date Posted: 23-Jun-2008 at 22:18
Well, this thread is another music sharing thread but focusing on Folk/Traditional/Root music from different cultures around the world.  I guess you could call it an Ethnomusicology thread though I don't know if we have any Ethnomusicologist in AE.  I'm certainly not.  But I do think it is an worthy endeavor for a history forum.
 
If you are familiar with other music threads I've been involved in you would have pretty good idea how I would contribute to this thread, an amateur enthusiast point of view.  I will be relying heavily on Wiki for descriptions and YouTube for sample clips.  But don't let my limitation stop you from bringing in other sources though.
 
First, we should touch on the definitions of Folk Music, Traditional Music and Roots Music.  I really not even qualified to do this, so I'll start out Wiki first to open the thread and do some more research as the thread develops.
 
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folk_music - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folk_music

Folk song can have a number of different meanings, including:

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traditional_music - Traditional music : The original meaning of the term "folk music" was synonymous with the term "Traditional music", also often including http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Music - World Music and Roots music; the term "Traditional music" was given its more specific meaning to distinguish it from the other definitions that "Folk music" is now considered to encompass.
  • Folk music can also describe a particular kind of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Popular_music - popular music which is based on traditional music. In contemporary times, this kind of folk music is often performed by professional musicians. Related genres include http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folk_rock - Folk rock and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_folk_music - Progressive folk music .
  • In American culture, folk music refers to the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_folk_music_revival - American folk music revival , music exemplified by such musicians as http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woody_Guthrie - Woody Guthrie , who is most noted for "This Land is Your Land, This Land is My Land," http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pete_Seeger - Pete Seeger , http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Dylan - Bob Dylan and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_Baez - Joan Baez , who popularized and encouraged the lyrical style in the 1950s and 1960s

.......The http://www.music.vt.edu/musicdictionary/textf/Folkmusic.html%7CVirginia - Tech Multimedia Music Dictionary defines it as "music of the common people that has been passed on by memorization or repetition rather than by writing, and has deep roots in its own culture." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folk_music#cite_note-0 - [1] It is still being passed on in this way today.

According to Webster's dictionary, folk music is the "traditional and typically anonymous music that is an expression of the life of the people in a community". People play and sing together rather than watching others perform.......

.......There was a vogue for folk music during the start of the Romantic period. One of the first to use it was Josef Haydn (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haydn_and_folk_music - Haydn and folk music ). Beethoven made arrangements of Irish, Welsh and Scottish folk songs (over 150 settings) (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_compositions_by_Ludwig_van_Beethoven - List of compositions by Ludwig van Beethoven ). Later composers used the material more liberally. Liszt, Brahms, Bruch, Tchaikovsky and Dvorak wrote folk dances that are often indistinguishable from tunes that come from the authentic tradition........
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roots_revival - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roots_revival

A roots revival (folk revival) is a trend which includes young performers popularizing the traditional musical styles of their ancestors. Often, roots revivals include an addition of newly-composed songs with socially and politically aware lyrics, as well as a general modernization of the folk sound. After an http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_folk_music_revival - American folk music revival in the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1950s - 1950s , a wave of roots revival swept the world in the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1960s - 1960s and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1970s - 70s . In most cases, the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folk_music - folk music being revived were not quite extinct, though some hadn't been played for years or were moribund; such cases include the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celtic_music - Celtic music of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornwall - Cornwall and the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isle_of_Man - Isle of Man , for example. In other cases, such as http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cameroon - Cameroon and the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominican_Republic - Dominican Republic , no revival was necessary as the music remained common, and was merely popularized and adapted for mainstream audiences at home and abroad.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Music - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_music

The term world music includes

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traditional_music - Traditional music (sometimes called http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folk_music - folk music or roots music) of any culture that are created and played by indigenous musicians or that are "closely informed or guided by indigenous music of the regions of their origin," http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_music#cite_note-0 - [1] including Western music (i.e. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celtic_music - Celtic music ). Most typically, the term world music has now replaced folk music as a shorthand description for the very broad range of recordings of traditional http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigenous_music - indigenous music and song from around the world.
  • Other non-Western music (including non-Western popular music and non-Western classical music)

World music does not include

  • Western http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Popular_music - popular music
  • Western http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_music - Art music (i.e. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_classical_music - European classical music )
  • Any post- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ska - ska genre of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jamaica - Jamaican music[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Citation_needed - citation needed ]
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reggaeton - Reggaeton

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethnomusicology - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethnomusicology
......While musicology's traditional subject has been the history and literature of Western art music, ethnomusicologists study all music as a human social and cultural phenomenon.....

......Ethnomusicologists often apply theories and methods from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_anthropology - cultural anthropology , http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_studies - cultural studies and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sociology - sociology as well as other disciplines in the social sciences and humanities. Though some ethnomusicologists primarily conduct historical studies, the majority are involved in long-term participant observation. Therefore, ethnomusicological work can be characterized as featuring a substantial, intensive ethnographic component......

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Here is a National Geographic page on different genres of World Music
http://worldmusic.nationalgeographic.com/worldmusic/view/page.basic/genres - http://worldmusic.nationalgeographic.com/worldmusic/view/page.basic/genres
 
 
American Folk Music Revival is something interesting and should be touched on also.   Though I have no problem discussing Bob Dylan or Joan Baez in this thread but that might lead to blurring the line between Pop Music or CMT style Country Music with Folk Music.  But I'm not the one to draw the line so do as you please.  However I welcome the discussions  on Leo Kottke like Bluegrass Country, some early Blues or Jazz like Delta Blues or Ragtime, even early Gospel.
 
My wish for this thread is to introduce traditional music from different parts of the world along with their history, instruments, cultural references, religious or communal rituals/ceremonies associated to them.  To even take it farther a comparative study among what is introduced in the thread, especially for the cultures that are related historically or geographically. 
 
I hope that was enough to get this thread going for now and I'll be back with my first entry Bulgarian Women's Choir.
 
 


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Replies:
Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 23-Jun-2008 at 22:37
Good thread! I will contribute shortly. I am on the pda at work right now. I have some Bosnian Sevdah Music, etc.

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Posted By: King Kang of Mu
Date Posted: 24-Jun-2008 at 01:58
The Bulgarian Women's Choir
 
Some of you might think it's rather random that I picked The Bulgarian Women's Choir to be introduced first by me but I have my reasons and hopefully that will reveal itself before this posting is over. 
 
How I came across to them is actually rather random.  As some of you already have noticed that I am a big Progressive Rock enthusiast.  One of the band I like is King Crimson I admire their guitarist Robert Fripp more than a musician.  I've read somewhere that Mr. Fripp has great fondness for this music.  So I had to check it out.
 
Let's start out with a sample clip.  This is from Johnny Carson Show when they were touring U.S. maybe in th 80's.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrcgDhpS3uo - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrcgDhpS3uo
 
Amazing!  There are three songs in the clip.  The first one grabs me the most.  Of course they create amazing harmony but any well trained choir would be able to create great harmony,  I mean that is kinda whole point.  But rhythmically they are unique.  I think some of that comes from the language itself, unique diction and syncopation of their accents in the language.  Second song reminded me of more traditional, maybe medieval/Byzantine church music/hymn.  Still wonderful harmony though. 
 
Third one is  probably 'The' American Folk song by Stephen Foster, 'Oh! Susanna'.  I learned this song in Korean translation when I was in elementary school in South Korea.  Before I came to America, when I thought about the word 'America' in musical sense other than Pop, Rap or Heavy Metal, etc I could hum 'Oh! Susanna' and 'Rhapsody in Blue'.  I just thought that they picked this song because they were in U.S. TV show, but when I looked up the song in Wiki for this posting I found something interesting.
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oh_Suzanna - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oh_Suzanna

"Oh! Susanna" is a song written by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Foster - Stephen Foster in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1847 - 1847 . Popularly associated with the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_Gold_Rush - California Gold Rush , the song is occasionally (incorrectly) called "Banjo on My Knee".

In 1843, the year Dan Emmett established http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=The_Virginia_Minstrels&action=edit&redlink=1 - The Virginia Minstrels as the first http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackface - blackface troupe in New York, Foster, 16, was working as a bookkeeper for his brother Morrison's business in Pittsburgh. Morrison was a friend of the early circus blackface clown, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dan_Rice - Dan Rice , and the young Stephen came under his influence.

Foster also became aware of the new fad of "Ethiopian" songs......

......Probably by fortuitous coincidence rather than design, the song appeared in the public eye at the same time as the new http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polka - polka fad was arriving from Europe. While minstrel songs prior to this time were considered uncouth, "Oh! Susanna!" thus provided an entre to the middle-class market......

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Hmmm, I didn't know that there was such 'dark' history to the song.  Another thing about my childhood memory is also that since Korean language does not have 'F' in their alphabet, 'F' becomes 'P'.  That would make 'Folk' music, 'Po K' music and 'Polka' music becomes 'Po Ka' music.  Now I think about it as I write actually, is the word 'Folk' and 'Polka' related, Etymologically?  That would make sense wouldn't it? 
 
Wiki says something about Open Throat singing which I don't know what that exactly means.  It does make me wonder though about any possible relation to Mongolian or Tuvan Overtone Throat singing.  But I am planning to introduce Overtone Throat singing also, so hope that question will be answered by then.
 
I couldn't find any article on The Bulgarian Women's Choir alone but it does get mentioned in the Music of Bulgaria article.
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_of_Bulgaria - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_of_Bulgaria

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulgaria - Bulgarian music is part of the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balkan - Balkan tradition, which stretches across http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southeastern_Europe - Southeastern Europe , and has its own distinctive cosmic sound. The Trachians ( ancestors of the Bulgarian nation) had knowledge of cosmic music, brought by Orpheus, who was born in the Bulgarian Mountain Rhodope.[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Citation_needed - citation needed ] Furthermore, they were aware of the mathematical theory of sounds.[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Citation_needed - citation needed ] This has all resulted in the wide variety of folklore sounds and music and the distinctive voices in Bulgaria today.[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Citation_needed - citation needed ] Traditional Bulgarian music has had more international success than its neighbors due to the breakout international success of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Le_Myst%C3%A8re_des_Voix_Bulgares - Le Mystère des Voix Bulgares , a woman's choir that has topped http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_music - world music charts across http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europe - Europe and even farther abroad.

  • NOTE: Bulgarian is written using the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyrillic_alphabet - Cyrillic alphabet , so transliterations into the Roman alphabet will result in minor variations of spelling (e.g., paidushko and padushka, gadulka and g'dulka).

Bulgarian vocals are said to be "open-throated", though this is somewhat of a misnomer. Singers actually focus their voices in a way that gives the sound a distinctive "edge", and makes the voice carry over long distances........

.......Singing has always been a tradition for both men and women. Songs were often sung by women at work parties such as the sedenka (often attended by young men and women in search of partners to court), betrothal ceremonies, and just for fun. Women had an extensive repertoire of songs that they sang while working in the fields. Young women eligible for marriage played a particularly important role at the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulgarian_dances - dancing in the village square ..........
 

.......The distinctive sounds of women's choirs in Bulgarian folk music come partly from their unique rhythms, harmony and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyphony - polyphony , such as the use of close intervals like the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Major_second - major second and the singing of a drone accompaniment underneath the melody, especially common in songs from the Shope region around the Bulgarian capital Sofia and the Pirin region. In addition to Koutev, who pioneered many of the harmonies, and composed several songs that were covered by other groups, (especially Tedora), various women's vocal groups gained popularity, including http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trio_Bulgarka - Trio Bulgarka , consisting of http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Yanka_Roupkina&action=edit&redlink=1 - Yanka Roupkina , http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Eva_Georgieva&action=edit&redlink=1 - Eva Georgieva , and http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Stoyanka_Boneva&action=edit&redlink=1 - Stoyanka Boneva , some of whom were included in the "Mystery of the Bulgarian Voices" tours.........

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Hmmm, Polyphony!  That sounds similar to 'Overtone' doesn't it?   I might be on to something here.   
 
Well, I gotta leave right now for a second but I will pick right back up at the 'Polyphony'.


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Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 24-Jun-2008 at 04:52
Here is an introduction to Sevdah in english, it is a bit lenghty but a good description.

www.sevdalinke.com

www.eveningofsevdah.com




Forst some pictures of Bosnia prior to the 20th century in spirit of the age of these songs.






Janissaries in Bosnia in the 1800s



Videos:

www.mostarsevdahreunion.com

Here is a rather recent interpretation - all these songs up anywhere from a century to two or more old -  of Sevdah. The group formed after the war and their name is Mostar Sevdah Reunion. Very popular in Europe; they performed in various countries and were presented in a few magazines as well.


The video is presented in a more traditional way in Mostar's old town.

Mostar Sevdah Reunion - Cuda jada od Mostara grada - A strange pain in the city of Mostar


http://youtube.com/watch?v=lr7vFb-5d7g


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Sevdah North America - Evening of Sevdah
http://youtube.com/watch?v=As5IPC8_mrg


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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NhezAf4BprM&feature=related

Features a compliation of pictures with Sevdah in background


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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o8K00dGSBAA

Hari Varesanovic - Bosno Moja - My Bosnia

This is a popular and older Sevdah song performed by Hari; who is a popular soft rock/ balad singer in the Balkans.



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This is Bosnian Sevdah - Perfomed in Turkey

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jiIfhpPihB0&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jSIBK-pSW38&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ufPA65Yels&feature=related


Enough for an initial show. I will post some more later on.






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Posted By: King Kang of Mu
Date Posted: 24-Jun-2008 at 06:16
Originally posted by es_bih

Good thread! I will contribute shortly. I am on the pda at work right now. I have some Bosnian Sevdah Music, etc.
 
Thanks es-bih.  Bosnian music would be great to compare to the one I'm working on right now, Bulgarian, I would assume.  Music is easier to appreciate than write about as I'm finding out more and more, especially for an amateur like me.  But anything you introduce I will try to give my honest opinion and try to find connection to little that I know.
 
Having said that I think I bit off something way bigger than I can chew with this 'Polyphony' thing.  I was trying to do some research on it but I was getting into music theories that I can't even begin to understand.  I don't wanna claim anything more than I know and i wanted this to be more of an Music sharing thread than Music theory thread so I will try to watch myself getting in too deep where I don't belong.  But if anyone feels confident or compelled enough, comparative Music theory discussion will be greatly appreciated.
 
But I couldn't just give up on 'Polyphony' so here is a brief description.
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyphony - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyphony

Within the context of Western music tradition the term is usually used in reference to music of the late http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medieval_music - Middle Ages and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renaissance_music - Renaissance . http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baroque_music - Baroque forms such as the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fugue - fugue which might be called polyphonic are usually described instead as http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Counterpoint - contrapuntal . Also, as opposed to the species terminology of counterpoint, polyphony was generally either "pitch-against-pitch" / "point-against-point" or "sustained-pitch" in one part with http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melisma - melismas of varying lengths in another (van der Werf, 1997). In all cases the conception was likely what Margaret Bent (1999) calls "dyadic counterpoint", with each part being written generally against one other part, with all parts modified if needed in the end. This point-against-point conception is opposed to "successive composition", where voices were written in an order with each new voice fitting into the whole so far constructed, which was previously assumed.....

European polyphony rose out of melismatic http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organum - organum , the earliest harmonization of the chant. Twelfth century composers, such as http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%C3%A9onin - Léonin and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P%C3%A9rotin - Pérotin developed the organum that was introduced centuries earlier, and also added a third and fourth voice to the now homophonic chant. In the thirteenth century, the chant-based tenor was becoming altered, fragmented, and hidden beneath secular tunes, obscuring the sacred texts as composers continued to play with this new invention called polyphony. The lyrics of love poems might be sung above sacred texts in the form of a http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trope_%28music%29 - trope , or the sacred text might be placed within a familiar secular melody......

.......These musical innovations appeared in a greater context of societal change. After the first millennium, European monks decided to start translating the works of Greek philosophers into the vernacular, following in the footsteps of the Muslims who did that 500 years earlier. Western Europeans were aware of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plato - Plato , http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socrates - Socrates , and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippocrates - Hippocrates during the Middle Ages. However they had largely lost touch with the content of their surviving works because the use of Greek as a living language was restricted to the lands of the Eastern Roman Empire ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byzantine_Empire - Byzantium ). The ancient works, as well as http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muslim - Muslim commentaries, started then being translated. Once they were accessible, the philosophies had a great impact on the mind of Western http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europe - Europe . Faced with new ideas, society was forced to view itself in a different light as secular ideas competed with the doctrine of the Roman church.

This sparked a number of innovations in medicine, science, art, and music.

The oldest surviving piece of six-part music is the English http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rota_%28music%29 - rota http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sumer_is_icumen_in - Sumer is icumen in (ca. 1240). (Albright, 2004)

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homophony - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homophony
In http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music - music , homophony (pronounced http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA_for_English - /hoʊˈmɒfəni/ , from Greek "homófonos", where ομοιο = the same, and φωνή = a sound, tone) is a http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texture_%28music%29 - texture in which two or more http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Part#Music - parts move together in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harmony - harmony , the relationship between them creating http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chord_%28music%29 - chords . This is distinct from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyphony - polyphony , in which parts move with rhythmic independence, and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monophony - monophony , in which all parts (if there are multiple parts) move in parallel rhythm and pitch. A homophonic texture is also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homorhythmic - homorhythmic http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homophony#cite_note-Griffith-0 - [1] (or uses a "very similar rhythm").
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I couldn't quite understand how Polyphony is different from any harmonic structure in traditional Western Music.  But looking at the description of Homophony actually gave me a better understanding in comparison.  But in relation to Open Throat Singing and Overtone Throat singing I'm gonna need more research.   I don't wanna bore you with this Music Theory mumble jumble so I'm moving on to another clip of the Bulgarian Women's Choir.
 
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The Mystery Of Bulgarian Voices - The project Voyager part 8
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWLMZnhUvUo&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWLMZnhUvUo&feature=related
 
This song is recorded on golden CDs and is on the spacecrafts Voyager 1 and 2 as a message of the human nation to other civilizations. The song is from the Rhodope region
The Voyager Golden Record is a phonograph record included in the two Voyager spacecraft launched in 1977. It contains sounds and images selected to portray the diversity of life and culture on Earth. It is intended for any intelligent extraterrestrial life form, or far future humans, that may find it. The Voyager spacecraft will take about 40,000 years to come near another star, 'near' meaning in this case within around 1.7 light-years' distance; .......
 
.......The 115 images are encoded in analog form. The remainder of the record is audio, designed to be played at 16⅔ revolutions per minute. It contains spoken greetings beginning with Akkadian, which was spoken in Sumer about six thousand years ago, and ending with Wu, a modern Chinese dialect.

Following the section on the sounds of Earth, there is an eclectic 90-minute selection of music from many cultures, including Eastern and Western classics. The selections include:Bulgaria "Излел е Делю хайдутин" ("Izlel je Delyo Hajdutin") traditional Valya Balkanska
Macedonia, Bulgaria, Greece, Rome, Turkey,Serbia, Thracians, Byzantium......
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I hope that gave you guys better understanding on why I have picked them to open the thread.  I don't need to ramble about how Music is universal and I don't need to get into the String Theory(well, I'm not qualified on that either, you know) to explain how the Universe is an elegant music.  As abstract and metaphysically Music comes to our ears, it is just particles coming in waves of different frequency just like everything else, just as physical.  Comically I think of the scene from 'Back to the Future' when Michael J. fox get blown back by the giant speaker(wouldn't that have blown his ear drums too?).  Biblically I think of the Music that tore down the walls of Jericho.   But most of all I think of Music that is so moving, that even the soldiers in battlefields would drop their guns and forget to fight, can't help themselves but look at one another and feel each other's pain and hope.   
 
When I heard last clip I couldn't help myself but to think about all the mothers in the world, their pain and hope.  Something so private yet so universal.  I know somehow if some alien civilization listens to it in the future they too will think of their mothers.  If they can't, I know they will envy us for us being able to.
 
I will end the night with a couple of more clips from the Bulgarian women.  Because you know I can't get enough of them.  And I will think of the enormity of the Universe and our Earthly mothers.
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGn5DrSmCJc&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGn5DrSmCJc&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5DdKA3G49q0 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5DdKA3G49q0


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Posted By: King Kang of Mu
Date Posted: 24-Jun-2008 at 06:58
Originally posted by es_bih


http://www.sevdalinke.com - www.sevdalinke.com
http://www.eveningofsevdah.com - www.eveningofsevdah.com

Videos:
http://www.mostarsevdahreunion.com - www.mostarsevdahreunion.com
http://youtube.com/watch?v=lr7vFb-5d7g - http://youtube.com/watch?v=lr7vFb-5d7g
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Sevdah North America - Evening of Sevdah
http://youtube.com/watch?v=As5IPC8_mrg - http://youtube.com/watch?v=As5IPC8_mrg
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NhezAf4BprM&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NhezAf4BprM&feature=related
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o8K00dGSBAA - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o8K00dGSBAA
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This is Bosnian Sevdah - Perfomed in Turkey
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jiIfhpPihB0&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jiIfhpPihB0&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jSIBK-pSW38&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jSIBK-pSW38&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ufPA65Yels&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ufPA65Yels&feature=related
 
Hey eh-bih, Thanks for your post again.  Once again it will take me least a couple of days to read through, listen, watch and digest what you have posted.  Good thing the Euro doesn't have games everyday any more, hah?Cry
 
Anyway, your links didn't show up as automatic links on my screen. Is it just me? I used to have same problem too, though I don't know how I fixed it.  So I consoildated your just your links as a quote, so lazy forumers like me can access more easily. 
 
I hope I have more to respond to your links next time and maybe we can even compare Bosnian music to Bulgarian, other Balkan. maybe Turkic music and more.
 
Thanks again


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Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 24-Jun-2008 at 07:00
I was rushing to get some content for your thread, I'll edit my post later on and include direct links. 

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Posted By: King Kang of Mu
Date Posted: 25-Jun-2008 at 09:03

Hey, eh-bih.  Finally got around to check out everything you've posted least a couple of times.

First I really enjoyed reading the introduction to Sevdah in this; http://www.sevdalinke.com - www.sevdalinke.com  .  But I will come back to that later.
 
Out of the sample clips I enjoyed this the most; http://www.mostarsevdahreunion.com - www.mostarsevdahreunion.com .  First the voice was so unadulterated and soulful to my ears.  It sounded as if I had a Bosnian uncle uncle and he sang to me about my family history.  But as down to earth and intimate as the voice sounded, the instrumentation was rather intricate and refined, especially the interplay between the horn,  the accordion(organ?) and the fiddle.  At times almost they were chasing one another.  The horn did remind me of some Mariachi horn sound.  Indeed even in rest of the clips I've found some Latin elements as well as strong Turkic/Islamic elements.  When I say Latin though, I mean Latin American as well as Mediterranean.  It was the actually the horn that embodied both elements, shifting in and out of both elements with splendid rhythmic quality.
 
Sevdah North America - Evening of Sevdah
http://youtube.com/watch?v=As5IPC8_mrg - http://youtube.com/watch?v=As5IPC8_mrg
In this performance I've also felt similar intimacy especially in the vocal.  That instrument Saz(?) was also very interesting to me.  It almost sounded like a 12 string guitar.  The pear shape of the body reminded me of Oud.  I used to date a Lebanese/Irish girl, though her Oud had almost 90 degree bent neck.  She used to play that for me.  Though Oud seems to me more of a finger picking instrument than a strumming instrument like your footage shows but my ex wasn't that skilled so she strummed it more which made Oud and Saz sound more similar(she's gonna visit me from New Orleans this weekend actually, kinda funny coincident).  Oud=Wood? Maybe Cyrus Shahmiri can answer this.
 
But I thought maybe I was comparing two isolated examples so looked up more footage on Saz and Oud to compare, especially the finger picking style of Saz.
 
Baglama-Saz & Hasan Genc
http://youtube.com/watch?v=ZXJAzS70r0M - http://youtube.com/watch?v=ZXJAzS70r0M
OMG, Joe SAZtriani!  Amazing!
 
Oud Music By Ali Hassan
http://youtube.com/watch?v=oJYe4g_kUj4 - http://youtube.com/watch?v=oJYe4g_kUj4
 
Based on above two footages Oud seem to have little warmer and fuller tone but I'm pretty sure there are many different variations of both instruments and more different style of playing them.  It will be interesting to get into that by different regions also.  Maybe some other time.
 
Well it's getting late again for me so I'm gonna have get back to the rest of the list later.  Maybe after the Euro semifinals.  But I would still like to get deeper into some of the cultural concepts that are mentioned in http://www.sevdalinke.com - www.sevdalinke.com .
 
Again, thanks for your enthusiasm, patience and contribution in this thread and good luck with whoever you support in Euro 08.  Take care 
 
   

 


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Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 25-Jun-2008 at 19:22
No problem, I will post more in here, I am getting ready for the Euro match, getting my Turkiye jersey out Smile

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Posted By: xristar
Date Posted: 25-Jun-2008 at 22:16
http://youtube.com/watch?v=AYV3ml4AT3g - http://youtube.com/watch?v=AYV3ml4AT3g
A polyphonic song from Greece (as a matter of fact from Albania, but it is in greek). It speaks of World War 2. It says: "One Sunday morning, war reached down Droviani; Come, let's go there, for you to see what's happening, how the blood of the Greeks is being spilled".


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Defeat allows no explanation
Victory needs none.
It insults the dead when you treat life carelessly.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 25-Jun-2008 at 23:05
Here are some more of Mostar Sevdah Reunion
http://youtube.com/watch?v=gt6FDBElmbg -
Gondze Ruzo Same as the first of their clips that I posted with a very powerful vocal supported by instrumentals that match.


http://youtube.com/watch?v=9HygOE9vuvw - Cije je ono djevojce This is a more relaxed and upbeat song, but with a familiar sevdah tone.


http://youtube.com/watch?v=4oowffuR29s - Oci moje kletvom bih vas kleo


Here is another



This is Arabeske featuring instrumentals by Zabranjeno Pusenje (No Smoking - a popular Yugoslavian rock band). There are some clips of a recent and popular movie in between in the video, too, for which the song had been re-made.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=OvF5idVRWbwje%20-%20Kad%20procvatu%20Behari%20 - Arabeske & Zabranjeno Pusenje - Kad procvatu Behari






Here are some clips from Himzo Polovina
He is a legendary sevdah interpreter and has recorded and collected sevdah songs for decades up to his death in 1981.

This particular song is much more soulful as the first clip of Mostar Sevdah Reunion that i posted initially:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZ9ZxUfpQXU&eurl=tekstovi-pesama.com/Himzo-Polovina/Gondze-ruzo/5080/1/ - Himzo -Emina

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lESdfxhbi_g - Version 2


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mGo8vHyq9MM - Himzo - Sunce tone dan se kloni (The sun is setting the day is winding)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iqFnlkLEiGg - Himzo - Askam geldi









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Posted By: King Kang of Mu
Date Posted: 26-Jun-2008 at 06:11
Originally posted by xristar

http://youtube.com/watch?v=AYV3ml4AT3g - http://youtube.com/watch?v=AYV3ml4AT3g
A polyphonic song from Greece (as a matter of fact from Albania, but it is in greek). It speaks of World War 2. It says: "One Sunday morning, war reached down Droviani; Come, let's go there, for you to see what's happening, how the blood of the Greeks is being spilled".
 
Hello, xristar!  Welcome to this thread.  Thanks for your posting.  It was great to listen to a polyphonic song from Greece right after I just introduced the Bulgarian style of it. It was one of the main reasons of what I wished this thread to be, a comparative sharing from posting to posting , region to region, culture to culture.
 
Your post definitely gave me a better understanding of what Polyphony is.  I thought I bit off more than I can chew and bore people with this music theory stuff, but I'm glad someone could relate to it in any way. 
 
I could tell how in both traditions, the different parts came in different time in the passage and held certain note until they made harmonic unison and then stop or broke off, only to do the same process again.  I can't tell you exactly what time signatures or harmonic chords are played but I could tell there are more then 2-3 involved. 
 
One thing very noticeable is, first the male female interplay compare to the Bulgarian Women's choir but I think they have mixed sex polyphonic in Bulgaria too, though i can't confirm it right now.  But when you had mixed sex singing there was definitely the division of labor as far as male part was lower and held longer notes with fewer and stretched out words though they seemed to come in behind the women's part.  Female parts seems carry shorter and higher notes with more lyrical content.  It would be actually interesting hear just womens parts with just more parts.  I think it would actually sound lot like the Bulgarian Women's Choir. 
 
There you go, you got me into all that music theory mumble jumble again.  It's so hard to be analytical with so little knowledge.  I wish there was a musicologist in this thread  to sort this all out.  I'm trying best I can.
 
The singers in your post seem more of your everyday village folks than trained choir, which is what really the 'folk' music is all about.  But i thought it would still interesting to see any artform in more refined manner least as a reference point. So I try to find similar Greek Albanian polyphonic performance. 
 
If you speak the language would you mind to take time to tell me what they are singing about or what you think of it?
 
Πολυφωνικό Χιμάρας
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZIDPHQ4Y7l4&NR=1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZIDPHQ4Y7l4&NR=1
 
Speaking of Greek music and Bulgarian music I would also like to do a brief introduction of Orppheus when I get around to it.  So stay tuned if you would.
Thanks again and see you in this thread again.
 
 
    


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Posted By: Theodore Felix
Date Posted: 26-Jun-2008 at 06:29
The polyphonic music shown in those videos is from southern Albania. Himara is a largely mixed Greco-Albanian village near Vlora while Droviani is a Greek village from the complete south. Its a very very common type of music found there and especially popular among Lab Albanians. There are many different types played by the various Tosk subgroups:

Here is some more info:
%20 - http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=DSa1mZrBq1g&feature=related
%20 - http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=yblItWZPG9Y
%20 - http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=mriwgIlJDnQ
This is from Lab Albanians: http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=mPYDwGxZHlI - http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=mPYDwGxZHlI

This is a modern type by an Albanian singer in Italy, Anna Hoxha, it uses a polyphinic background:
%20 - http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=C22KX37jmW4

This polyphony is mostly the southern Albanian one, the Gheg(northern Albanian) differs quite a bit.

You can read more about it here:
http://worldmusiccentral.org/article.php/20041228040955584 - http://worldmusiccentral.org/article.php/20041228040955584

I have never heard of Polyphonic music from Bulgaria. This is quite interesting, up until now I thought it was unique to the region I was from. Do you have any samples of it?


Posted By: King Kang of Mu
Date Posted: 26-Jun-2008 at 07:50
Hello, Theodore Felix.  Thanks for your post.
 
Now, I'm just learning about the concept of Polyphony after I started this thread.  Actually i was just introducing The Bulgarian Women's Choir and doing some research in Wiki and the concept came up. 
 
I did however post a couple long posting on them and the concept.  But I'm not a Musicologist or ever have been to the Balkan penninsula, so I highly doubt that I have good understanding of the concept. 
 
I know those were rather long and boring postings by me and  don't blame you if you overlooked them.Big%20smile
 
So I will quote myself about The Bulgarian Women's Choir and Polyphony parts from my previous posts.  But there a couple of long posts by me in the begining of the thread so you should check them out if you feel compelled to ,after reading this post. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Originally posted by King Kang of Mu

The Bulgarian Women's Choir
 ........
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrcgDhpS3uo - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrcgDhpS3uo
 .......
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_of_Bulgaria - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_of_Bulgaria

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulgaria - Bulgarian music is part of the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balkan - Balkan tradition, which stretches across http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southeastern_Europe - Southeastern Europe , and has its own distinctive cosmic sound. The Trachians ( ancestors of the Bulgarian nation) had knowledge of cosmic music, brought by Orpheus, who was born in the Bulgarian Mountain Rhodope.[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Citation_needed - citation needed ] Furthermore, they were aware of the mathematical theory of sounds.[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Citation_needed - citation needed ] This has all resulted in the wide variety of folklore sounds and music and the distinctive voices in Bulgaria today.[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Citation_needed - citation needed ] Traditional Bulgarian music has had more international success than its neighbors due to the breakout international success of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Le_Myst%C3%A8re_des_Voix_Bulgares - Le Mystère des Voix Bulgares , a woman's choir that has topped http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_music - world music charts across http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europe - Europe and even farther abroad.

  • NOTE: Bulgarian is written using the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyrillic_alphabet - Cyrillic alphabet , so transliterations into the Roman alphabet will result in minor variations of spelling (e.g., paidushko and padushka, gadulka and g'dulka).

Bulgarian vocals are said to be "open-throated", though this is somewhat of a misnomer. Singers actually focus their voices in a way that gives the sound a distinctive "edge", and makes the voice carry over long distances........

.......Singing has always been a tradition for both men and women. Songs were often sung by women at work parties such as the sedenka (often attended by young men and women in search of partners to court), betrothal ceremonies, and just for fun. Women had an extensive repertoire of songs that they sang while working in the fields. Young women eligible for marriage played a particularly important role at the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulgarian_dances - dancing in the village square ..........
 

.......The distinctive sounds of women's choirs in Bulgarian folk music come partly from their unique rhythms, harmony and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyphony - polyphony , such as the use of close intervals like the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Major_second - major second and the singing of a drone accompaniment underneath the melody, especially common in songs from the Shope region around the Bulgarian capital Sofia and the Pirin region. In addition to Koutev, who pioneered many of the harmonies, and composed several songs that were covered by other groups, (especially Tedora), various women's vocal groups gained popularity, including http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trio_Bulgarka - Trio Bulgarka , consisting of http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Yanka_Roupkina&action=edit&redlink=1 - Yanka Roupkina , http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Eva_Georgieva&action=edit&redlink=1 - Eva Georgieva , and http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Stoyanka_Boneva&action=edit&redlink=1 - Stoyanka Boneva , some of whom were included in the "Mystery of the Bulgarian Voices" tours.........

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Hmmm, Polyphony!  That sounds similar to 'Overtone' doesn't it?   I might be on to something here.   
 
Well, I gotta leave right now for a second but I will pick right back up at the 'Polyphony'.


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Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 26-Jun-2008 at 08:04
This is becoming a very good thread Thumbs%20Up. I like your contribution Theodore and xristar

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Posted By: King Kang of Mu
Date Posted: 26-Jun-2008 at 09:19

Alright, es_bih.  This is gonna be the last one for me for the night/morning.  I'm gonna make it a short one.  This is gonna be actually little off the topic.

SEVDAH Jusuf Stari i Sandzak
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NhezAf4BprM&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NhezAf4BprM&feature=related
 
^^^That one you posted(see I'm still working through your first list), I don't know if it's the picture slide show or it's late and I'm delirious but it reminded me of this song from an Italian film called 'Cinema Paradiso'.  The music was composed by the famous Italian film composer Annio Morricone.  However the particular track I wanted post I couldn't find with the film footage.  But I did find it with someone's home movie footage.
 
'Childhood and Manhood'  from Cinema Paradiso by Annio Morricone 
  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3rv5pB_Olj0 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3rv5pB_Olj0
 
I don't know, is it just me or the accordion on later part of 'Jusuf Stari i Sandzak' remind you of the violin in the beginning part of 'Childhood and Manhood'?  Maybe it is way past my bed time.
 
Maybe it's the Mediterranian elements I was talking about in the earlier post.  Anyway if you haven't seen the movie, it's a great movie.
 
I also found the same track played by this crazy Korean American kid who plays with two electric guitars at once that I couldn't pass up.  Freaking freak!
 
Childhood & Manhood (OST: Cinema Paradiso)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBPY-CJJ-LQ&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBPY-CJJ-LQ&feature=related
 
This is a trailer for the movie with the footages so you guys can get a sense of what the movie is about and why it reminded me of the picture slide show in Jusuf Stari i Sandzak.
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSLZLkcMrHU&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSLZLkcMrHU&feature=related
 
 
 
 


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Posted By: xristar
Date Posted: 26-Jun-2008 at 13:44
If you speak the language would you mind to take time to tell me what they are singing about or what you think of it?
 
Πολυφωνικό Χιμάρας
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZIDPHQ4Y7l4&NR=1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZIDPHQ4Y7l4&NR=1

This song is apparently sung by a man's perspective and roughly says "there were three beautiful girls, walking on the road alone. If someone went there he would take all three. I'd storm and take one, even if they cut my "wings" [not sure]. I'd storm and take two, even if they would cut my throat. I'd storm and take three, even if they put me to prison".

EDIT: Theodore, many of your links don't work.


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Defeat allows no explanation
Victory needs none.
It insults the dead when you treat life carelessly.


Posted By: vranakonti
Date Posted: 26-Jun-2008 at 13:57
Originally posted by xristar

http://youtube.com/watch?v=AYV3ml4AT3g - http://youtube.com/watch?v=AYV3ml4AT3g
A polyphonic song from Greece (as a matter of fact from Albania, but it is in greek). It speaks of World War 2. It says: "One Sunday morning, war reached down Droviani; Come, let's go there, for you to see what's happening, how the blood of the Greeks is being spilled".
 
So xristar this is a typical example of Greek music?!


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Ti Shqipri m ep nder...


Posted By: vranakonti
Date Posted: 26-Jun-2008 at 14:23

This is the masterpiece of the Albanian polyphony(in my opinion).

Janino.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfsyz3P5lz0 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfsyz3P5lz0
Live version,from a local group.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rsgq09ktoyI&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rsgq09ktoyI&feature=related


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Ti Shqipri m ep nder...


Posted By: King Kang of Mu
Date Posted: 26-Jun-2008 at 16:54
Originally posted by vranakonti

This is the masterpiece of the Albanian polyphony(in my opinion).

Janino.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfsyz3P5lz0 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfsyz3P5lz0
Live version,from a local group.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rsgq09ktoyI&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rsgq09ktoyI&feature=related
 
They are both excellent clips.  Thanks vranakonti! 
 
I don't exactly know what you meant by 'a local group' for the second clip but those men seemed way too refined to be just village folks.  I meant that as a complement like they should be professionals and revered like cultural idols.
 
The first clip was truly a masterpiece though.  I don't know if it was the difference in the audio qualities in both footages but the first clip had clear harmonic unison and better rhythmic syncopation.  But it's always easier to syncopate with less people.
Both seemed good example of the art form they represent.  Thanks for posting them.


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Posted By: King Kang of Mu
Date Posted: 26-Jun-2008 at 17:20
Originally posted by xristar

If you speak the language would you mind to take time to tell me what they are singing about or what you think of it?
 
Πολυφωνικό Χιμάρας
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZIDPHQ4Y7l4&NR=1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZIDPHQ4Y7l4&NR=1

This song is apparently sung by a man's perspective and roughly says "there were three beautiful girls, walking on the road alone. If someone went there he would take all three. I'd storm and take one, even if they cut my "wings" [not sure]. I'd storm and take two, even if they would cut my throat. I'd storm and take three, even if they put me to prison".

EDIT: Theodore, many of your links don't work.
 
Oh, my.....   You are serious about the song right?  Well it is kinda complement for those girls I guess.  They are so beautiful that, he wouldn't mind getting 'clipped' and prisoned for a brief moment of ill advised blissful transgression.  It is some what crude for 21st century modern sensibility but what culture doesn't have songs about boys drooling at the girls.  I mean, is Britteny Spears supposed to be more sanitary morally?
 
Anyway your translation remind me of this Bossa Nova song 'Girl from Ipanema' by Astud Gilberto and Stan Getz.
 
'Girl from Ipanema'
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tC2ZhhSoc_E&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tC2ZhhSoc_E&feature=related
 
 
 
And you're right, Theodore Felix's links doesn't work for me either.  I thought it was just me. 


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Posted By: Roberts
Date Posted: 26-Jun-2008 at 17:44
Here are some clips from Latvian Song Festival. It is most important event in Latvian culture and it takes place once in every 5 years with around 30000 participants.
The choir singing is the main event.

Saule, Pērkons, Daugava (Sun, Thunder, Daugava (largest river which crosses Latvia))
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=baaX4-1_df0 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=baaX4-1_df0
Manai dzimtenei (for my homeland)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ddY5BDPaGU - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ddY5BDPaGU
Dziesma, ar ko tu sacies ( Song, how do you begin?)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=roZP8PNHsao&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=roZP8PNHsao&feature=related
Gaismas pils (Castle of light)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WDhbvfvMd34 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WDhbvfvMd34


Posted By: Theodore Felix
Date Posted: 26-Jun-2008 at 17:55

EDIT: Theodore, many of your links don't work.


Im sorry, your going to have to copy and paste the links. I dont know why their not working when you click on them....


Posted By: vranakonti
Date Posted: 26-Jun-2008 at 22:38
Originally posted by King Kang of Mu

Originally posted by vranakonti

This is the masterpiece of the Albanian polyphony(in my opinion).

Janino.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfsyz3P5lz0 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfsyz3P5lz0
Live version,from a local group.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rsgq09ktoyI&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rsgq09ktoyI&feature=related
 
They are both excellent clips.  Thanks vranakonti! 
 
I don't exactly know what you meant by 'a local group' for the second clip but those men seemed way too refined to be just village folks.  I meant that as a complement like they should be professionals and revered like cultural idols.
 
The first clip was truly a masterpiece though.  I don't know if it was the difference in the audio qualities in both footages but the first clip had clear harmonic unison and better rhythmic syncopation.  But it's always easier to syncopate with less people.
Both seemed good example of the art form they represent.  Thanks for posting them.
The difference is exactly that,the first was recorded in a studio,by well-known singers ,instead the second is an amateur village band.But they are good enough,is all about practise,they start singing those songs from their childhood.
btw some info,thats a mourning song,at least 2 centuries old,and describes a revolt against Turks.
When ill have some time ill post a long post describing,more regional variants of our music.
 
 


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Ti Shqipri m ep nder...


Posted By: King Kang of Mu
Date Posted: 27-Jun-2008 at 01:17
Originally posted by Roberts

Here are some clips from Latvian Song Festival. It is most important event in Latvian culture and it takes place once in every 5 years with around 30000 participants.
The choir singing is the main event.

Saule, Pērkons, Daugava (Sun, Thunder, Daugava (largest river which crosses Latvia))
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=baaX4-1_df0 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=baaX4-1_df0
Manai dzimtenei (for my homeland)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ddY5BDPaGU - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ddY5BDPaGU
Dziesma, ar ko tu sacies ( Song, how do you begin?)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=roZP8PNHsao&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=roZP8PNHsao&feature=related
Gaismas pils (Castle of light)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WDhbvfvMd34 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WDhbvfvMd34
Cool, cool , Roberts.  Welcome to the thread.  That Latvian Song Festival seems really awesome  event.  It really showed the unity of the people.  It's also really cool that everyone was wearing what seems to the traditional Latvian attire.   And also evrybody in the stand seems to be the performers themselves.  That is really a cool concept.  Other than maybe some football games or some totalitarian regime mass games like North Korea I don't think I've seen anything quite like that.
 
But the songs themselves, they reminded me too much of traditional Western Classical music form, and the instrumentation sounded even more modern, it threw me off a little.  Nice songs regardless but I'm looking for more 'folky' music though.  I was drawn to the melodies of the second and the third clips though.  
 
In my opening post I tried to explain what is more 'folky' but I also looked for some Latvian examples my own.
 
PEPT 2007 - Latvian folk music Paurupe 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGb1BzM1nFE - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGb1BzM1nFE
 
Also I couldn't mention Latvia without this footage.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcEl7NmVxhA - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcEl7NmVxhA


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Posted By: Roberts
Date Posted: 27-Jun-2008 at 02:53
Originally posted by King Kang of Mu

Cool, cool , Roberts.  Welcome to the thread.  That Latvian Song Festival seems really awesome  event.  It really showed the unity of the people.  It's also really cool that everyone was wearing what seems to the traditional Latvian attire.   And also evrybody in the stand seems to be the performers themselves.  That is really a cool concept.  Other than maybe some football games or some totalitarian regime mass games like North Korea I don't think I've seen anything quite like that.
 
But the songs themselves, they reminded me too much of traditional Western Classical music form, and the instrumentation sounded even more modern, it threw me off a little.  Nice songs regardless but I'm looking for more 'folky' music though.  I was drawn to the melodies of the second and the third clips though.  
 
In my opening post I tried to explain what is more 'folky' but I also looked for some Latvian examples my own.
 
PEPT 2007 - Latvian folk music Paurupe 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGb1BzM1nFE - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGb1BzM1nFE

I see, in that case you have to listen to the Latvian folk songs performed by one of the best pagan heavy metal band in the world "Skyforger" Cheers Viking
They usually perform heavy metal songs with Latvian folk motives and sounds, but here is a nice exception.
http://youtube.com/watch?v=VTMZqHQhvQ0 - http://youtube.com/watch?v=VTMZqHQhvQ0


Also I couldn't mention Latvia without this footage.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcEl7NmVxhA - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcEl7NmVxhA

Yeah, those were good times. Now the same coach who led us to EURO 2004 is back in charge of national team. We have rather easy qualification group for WC2010 with Greece, Switzerland and Isreal  - so see you in South Africa Big%20smile.


Posted By: King Kang of Mu
Date Posted: 27-Jun-2008 at 03:19
Originally posted by Roberts


I see, in that case you have to listen to the Latvian folk songs performed by one of the best pagan heavy metal band in the world "Skyforger" Cheers Viking
They usually perform heavy metal songs with Latvian folk motives and sounds, but here is a nice exception.
http://youtube.com/watch?v=VTMZqHQhvQ0 - http://youtube.com/watch?v=VTMZqHQhvQ0
 
Wow 12th century warrior music?  That's so cool!  You know if you want to introduce more music from this band, especially more heavier, Folk Metal/Prog Folk type there is a perfect thread for them, 'In the Court of King Kang(New Music Needed)' thread.
 
But I really appreciate the clip you've posted because that was more like a Metal band playing a Folk song than just a Folk Metal song.  Thanks


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http://www.allempires.net/forum/forums.html


Posted By: King Kang of Mu
Date Posted: 27-Jun-2008 at 03:39
Originally posted by es_bih


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o8K00dGSBAA - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o8K00dGSBAA
-------------------------------
This is Bosnian Sevdah - Perfomed in Turkey
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jiIfhpPihB0&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jiIfhpPihB0&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jSIBK-pSW38&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jSIBK-pSW38&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ufPA65Yels&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ufPA65Yels&feature=related
 
Alright, es_bih.  Back to the rest of your first post.
 
I'm gonna commenty on all four of them together because there are similarities in the production level.  There were kinda Eurovision like feel to these concerts, more modernized.  But it was still cool to see the traditional instruments in those settings, especially in the Turkey performance because they were a Ochestra of the traditional Sevdah instruments.  You can really feel the power of those instruments in numbers.
 
And it seems to me that the audience knew those songs well and captivated by the performances.  Also I don't know if any of those performances were of medley of songs but they seem to shift in and out of different tempo and instrumentation fluently.  The singers are really smooth too.  They were like young Frank Sinatras of Sevdah!
 
What's Hari Mata Hari mean?  Does that have anything to do with Mata Hari the female spy, or just names?


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http://www.allempires.net/forum/forums.html


Posted By: vranakonti
Date Posted: 27-Jun-2008 at 05:16
This is also the remake of an old North Albanian epic song,probably very similar in its contents with that posted by Robert,it speaks about Jakup Ferri,warrior,and  heroe famous among other things for cutting 30 heads,however at the end he dies.Smile
 
this is the original.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nn9cPblP2uk - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nn9cPblP2uk
90's  remake
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vitRzGQebVA - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vitRzGQebVA
recent remake
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HInXLKsupCM&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HInXLKsupCM&feature=related
 
 
This instead are some some examples of Albanian music from South to North.
Albanian folk music

Albanian folk music falls into three sylistic groups, with other important music areas around Shkoder and Tirana; the major groupings are the Ghegs of the north and southern Labs and Tosks. The northern and southern traditions are contrasted by the "rugged and heroic" tone of the north and the "relaxed, gentle and exceptionally beautiful" form of the south. These disparate styles are unified by "the intensity that both performers and listeners give to their music as a medium for patriotic expression and as a vehicle carrying the narrative of oral history", as well as certain characteristics like the use of obscure rhythms such as 3/8, 5/8 and 10/8.

 

South Albanian music

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3AHGMPF39GQ&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3AHGMPF39GQ&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PDyOltBCck0 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PDyOltBCck0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wLSrx32oDyc&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wLSrx32oDyc&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Agj1uyuo3Eg&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Agj1uyuo3Eg&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QXacSJbaSU0&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QXacSJbaSU0&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3AHGMPF39GQ - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3AHGMPF39GQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5xadGoDnV8 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5xadGoDnV8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SP9NpyrlWgI&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SP9NpyrlWgI&feature=related

 

Polyphony

 

http://www.emusic.com/album/Vranisht-Kenge-polifonike-läbe-Albania-MP3-Download/10940041.html - http://www.emusic.com/album/Vranisht-Kenge-polifonike-läbe-Albania-MP3-Download/10940041.html

 

Korca(city)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKeB7C4V0Ho&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKeB7C4V0Ho&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9zd_Kh5qE5M&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9zd_Kh5qE5M&feature=related

 

instrumental Clarinet

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pS2fBO-ibU&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pS2fBO-ibU&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bztTf8GlMTk&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bztTf8GlMTk&feature=related

 

instrumental flaut

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SsWj0fw8UFY - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SsWj0fw8UFY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7diac1Qjxuc&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7diac1Qjxuc&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZ3MTmEvT4M&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZ3MTmEvT4M&feature=related

 

Center Albania

 

Tirana(city)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cPYcj2-R4oU - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cPYcj2-R4oU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ghfn4bexOh4&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ghfn4bexOh4&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5skV5TEy5qg&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5skV5TEy5qg&feature=related

 

 

North Albania

 

Instrumental,mostly with cifteli(typical north Albanian instrument) and flaut,from different regions.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yhdu9TstjIg&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yhdu9TstjIg&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1QAt47akzk0&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1QAt47akzk0&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45CwRE9l71A - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45CwRE9l71A

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKOLvg5s5f8&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKOLvg5s5f8&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7fi6_7l0Dc&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7fi6_7l0Dc&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oF6AJvAzoHo&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oF6AJvAzoHo&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5hPQR7cMMeg&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5hPQR7cMMeg&feature=related

 

Instrumental Lute.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Ne6JjgjWMM&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Ne6JjgjWMM&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BXv18EaGRJU&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BXv18EaGRJU&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0kNgpkdeMiA - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0kNgpkdeMiA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xe2F9O_1V4k&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xe2F9O_1V4k&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ej4j0otpy2A&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ej4j0otpy2A&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11XjBSkJtmo&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11XjBSkJtmo&feature=related

 

Shkodra(city)

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0EgBsSKlnPo&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0EgBsSKlnPo&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgwLmQ_-XcI&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgwLmQ_-XcI&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fVuk3m0eI9w&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fVuk3m0eI9w&feature=related

 

Albanians in Italy

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0geWS1UDYdw&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0geWS1UDYdw&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Qn7QHBY7MM - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Qn7QHBY7MM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5LybloI4Yu8 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5LybloI4Yu8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6Afde_pAJw&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6Afde_pAJw&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTXIEdFN2Ac&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTXIEdFN2Ac&feature=related

 



-------------
Ti Shqipri m ep nder...


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 27-Jun-2008 at 05:31
Originally posted by King Kang of Mu

Originally posted by es_bih


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o8K00dGSBAA - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o8K00dGSBAA
-------------------------------
This is Bosnian Sevdah - Perfomed in Turkey
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jiIfhpPihB0&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jiIfhpPihB0&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jSIBK-pSW38&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jSIBK-pSW38&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ufPA65Yels&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ufPA65Yels&feature=related
 
Alright, es_bih.  Back to the rest of your first post.
 
I'm gonna commenty on all four of them together because there are similarities in the production level.  There were kinda Eurovision like feel to these concerts, more modernized.  But it was still cool to see the traditional instruments in those settings, especially in the Turkey performance because they were a Ochestra of the traditional Sevdah instruments.  You can really feel the power of those instruments in numbers.
 
And it seems to me that the audience knew those songs well and captivated by the performances.  Also I don't know if any of those performances were of medley of songs but they seem to shift in and out of different tempo and instrumentation fluently.  The singers are really smooth too.  They were like young Frank Sinatras of Sevdah!
 
What's Hari Mata Hari mean?  Does that have anything to do with Mata Hari the female spy, or just names?


The three there were performed in Turkey, its Bosnain sevdah music, there are a lot of Turks with Bosnian descent thus no surprise that a lotof the songs would be known.

It is just a name and a play on words his name is Hari.


-------------


Posted By: King Kang of Mu
Date Posted: 27-Jun-2008 at 07:05

Wow, vranaknoti! you really went all out this time.  That's what I like to see, brother.   I see you included a whole section on an instrument called Lute, that's even better.  It's gonna take me even more time to get through all that though.  I will try what I can.  You know I would like to try a couple of times and be able say more than 'That's cool'.

I will take this opportunity to say I thank everyone who's been involved in this thread so far.  I think it had way better start than I expected, indeed it is overwhelming me a little in very positive way. 

Just like my other music thread I want this thread to be somewhat of an archival thread, so someone who's interested enough in folk music can stumble upon and be able to click on any page and find different kind of music from all over the world. 
 
Although I am really grateful to all of your participations and I will try to respond to them as much as I can but I'm just one man with little knowledge and much enthusiasm.  So feel free to introduce and post the sample clips as much as you can, but I also need some of you guys to start creating some comparative discussions with each other.  So feel free to check out each other's contribution and draw interests from each other.  That would help me out a lot to learn from you guys more and also give me more time to introduce more music and different cultural concepts. 
 
For example, many of you are interested in this Polyphonic music.  Although I'm learning more and more about it everyday, thanks to you guys, but I'm still very new to the concept.  So some of you who are more familiar with it can generate more discussion about it, I and others will learn lot more about it.
 
I don't know if what I just wrote even made sense at all.  Mostly I'm just complaining about my own limitation and I don't wanna disappoint you guys. 
 
Thanks again for this great start and let's share and learn more from each other!        


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Posted By: King Kang of Mu
Date Posted: 27-Jun-2008 at 08:33
vranakonti,
 
Just clicked on this one http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yhdu9TstjIg&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yhdu9TstjIg&feature=related rather randomly.  Amazing!
 
I'm assuming that small metal recorder looking instrument is Flaut?  I see an Oud also.  I don't think I see Cifteli in this footage though.  Maybe in other clips under this one.  I looked up some google image of Cifteli and it looked lot like Saz.
 
Cifteli
              Saz
 
I guess Cifteli is more Banjo like thinner and flatter body and Saz has mor pearlike shape and deeper and round body?
 
Anyway all your clips ao far has been great.  I can't wait to go through them all.
 
I'm excted about all those instruments.  I found this website that has pictures of bunch of different string instruments where I got that picture of Saz from. 
 
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
 
http://www.toddgreen.com/strings.html - http://www.toddgreen.com/strings.html
Oud (Middle East)

http://www.toddgreen.com/b1757.gif"> http://www.toddgreen.com/b1953.gif">The%20Oud,%20Er-Hu,%20Surpeti,%20Gembri,%20and%20Sentir The Oud is the most popular string instrument throughout the Middle East and North Africa. It is a short-necked, fretless instrument, which was brought back to Europe by the crusaders, where it influenced the development of the lute, which is the predecessor of the classical guitar. This instrument was originally called "Al-Oud" (which means "the wood"), a phrase that evolved into "Lute" in Europe and "Oud" or "Ud" in the Arab world. The earliest known Oud was discovered in a tomb from the reign of Queen Hatshepsut of Egypt, approx. 1500 B.C. Turkish Ouds (left side of photo) have a somewhat shallower body than Syrian and Egyptian Ouds (right side of photo.) The body is made of strips of hardwood, such as rosewood, walnut, maple and mahogany, usually in two contrasting colors. The peghead angles sharply back from the plane of the http://www.toddgreen.com/b1926.gif">
neck and has ebony friction tuners. All Ouds have ivory filigree over the soundhole and the Arabic Ouds also have elaborate mother-of-pearl inlay (see close-up.) There are eleven strings, arranged in five double courses, with a single bass string. The standard Turkish/Armenian tuning is low to high: E, AA, BB, ee, aa, dd. The Arabic tuning is a minor third lower. The top four strings are generally tuned this way, but the two lowest strings can be changed, according to the "makam" (the scale or mode) that is being played. Traditionally, the strings were plucked with an eagle quill, known as a "mizrap". Today, most players use plastic plectrums.
* Hamza El Din, Hossein Behroozi-Nia, Munir Nurettin Beken, Munir Bachir, Simon Shaheen, Rahim Alhaj


http://www.toddgreen.com/b_saz_back.gif"> http://www.toddgreen.com/b_saz.gif"> Saz or Baglama (Middle East)

A popular, long-necked lute, played throughout Turkey, Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon and Egypt. This is a seven-string instrument, divided into three courses, tuned, from low to high, Gg, Dd, Aaa. Like many Middle-Eastern string instruments, the Saz also has tied-on nylon frets. Unlike most plucked string instruments, the sound-hole is on the bottom instead of the top of the body.
* Kord Bayat, Talip Ozkan, Erdal Erzincan




http://www.toddgreen.com/b1789.gif"> Yali Tambur (Turkey)

Long-necked, bowed string instrument with six strings divided into three courses, tuned DD, AA, dd. The bridge rests on a skin head like on a Western banjo. Most of the melody is played on the high course of strings. This instrument is sometimes refered to as a bass banjo because of the low pitch of the strings. The neck has tied-on nylon frets, which are spaced for Middle-Eastern scales, which include quarter-tones. It is also possible to pluck the strings.
* Ali Jihad Racy


 

http://www.toddgreen.com/b1817.gif"> http://www.toddgreen.com/b1815.gif"> Tar (Iran)

The tar is the king of the plucked-string instruments in Iran. Like a lot of Iran's instruments, variations from this instrument are played throughout Central Asia. The body is carved out of a mulberry tree. The long neck is fitted with camel bone and has six strings in pairs, usually tuned Root, fifth, root. The bridge rests on a skin top which give the tar its characteristic sonority. The frets are nylon and tied on. They can be adjusted to get the notes used in Persian music between the notes in the western scale.
* Mohammad Reza Lotfi, Amir Koushkani, Hamid Montebassem

http://www.toddgreen.com/b1921.gif"> Setar (Iran)

The Setar (center of photo) is a small lute with a long neck. It has four metal strings. It has been mentioned in literature and poetry since the 12th Century. Like the tar, the setar has tied on frets made of nylon (see close-up.) It is plucked with the index finger and used extensively by Sufi mystics in Iran.
* Mohammad Reza Lotfi, Shahram Nazeri

Kamenchech (Iran)

http://www.toddgreen.com/b1806.gif"> http://www.toddgreen.com/b1803.gif"> This popular spiked fiddle is played throughout the Middle East. Similar instruments called Rabab in Egypt and Turkey and Ghijak in Central Asia are used in their classical and vocal musics. The four metal strings on the Persian instrument (left side of photo) can be tuned like a western violin G, D, A, E, or Root, fifth, root, fifth or root, fourth, root, fourth. It is held upright, resting on the player's left thigh, and the horse hair bow is made more or less taut by the players' fingers in order to heighten the sensitivity of touch in the course of playing. The instrument is turned on the pivot to access the strings while the bow is held in the same position. The bridge rests on a skin top (see close-up.)
* Kayhan Kalhor, Asghar Bahari, Sa'id Farajpuri

Fasil Kemenche (Turkey)

This three-stringed traditional violin (right side of photo) is used in the classical and Sufi religious music of Turkey. It is held upright on the lap and played with a bow. Like the Indian Sarangi, the left hand fingers don't press directly on the strings, but touch the string on the side with the fleshy part of the finger between the nail and the first joint.
* Tanburi Cemil Bey, Necdet Yasar Ensemble

Santur (Iran)

http://www.toddgreen.com/b1767.gif"> The Persian Santur is the original Santur. It is a three-octave dulcimer with 72 strings arranged in 4-string courses. It is played with very thin, wooden hammers with felt on the ends. It can be made out of various kinds of wood depending on the desired sound quality. Both instruments have adjustable bridges, allowing you to play three octaves on the Persian one. Though the Santur originated in Persia, it has universal appeal. The Greeks have a similar instrument called a Santoori; the Chinese have the Yang Chin; the Hungarians have the Cymbalon; and the Germans have the Hackbrett.

 

http://www.toddgreen.com/b1842.gif"> http://www.toddgreen.com/b1956.gif"> Sarangi (India)

For many centuries, the Sarangi has been the premier bowed instrument of India. It is held upright on the lap and bowed with the palm facing up. Instead of pressing the strings with the top of the fingers of left hand, the player presses the sides of the strings with the cuticle (see close-up.)  In earlier times, its primary role was to accompany classical vocal music, because of its voice-like quality. Today, it has been accepted as a solo instrument as well. There are three main playing strings tuned tonic (Sa), fifth (Pa) and tonic (sa). In addition, there are 30 to 40 resonating strings (see http://www.toddgreen.com/b1960.gif"> close-up.) All these strings pass through the bridge, which rests on a skin head. Some of these are tuned to the rag (scale) and some are chromatic. These tuners are at the top and along the side of the body.
* Ram Narayan, Sultan Khan, Ramesh Misra, Dhruba Ghosh

 

 

http://www.toddgreen.com/b1770.gif"> Santoor (India)

The Indian Santoor (29A), from the northern state of Kashmir, for centuries was an accompaniment to vocalists. Originally it was called a "Shata Tantri Veena," or the 100 string lute. The Santoor pictured has 93 strings arranged in 3-string courses. A standard Indian tuning has the Sa (or tonic) as the lowest note. The first octave is tuned to the Raga to be played. The rest of the strings are tuned chromatically. It is played with two relatively thick, wooden hammers.

 

 


Tamburas or Tanpuras (Ind

http://www.toddgreen.com/b1743.gif">

ia)

In traditional Indian music, the tamburas provide the drone, which delineates the key in which the solo instruments perform. The traditional tamburas come in two sizes, called the male (left side of photo) and the female (right side of photo.) They each cover a different range of keys in octave. These instruments can have four to six strings and are usually tuned to the tonic (Sa) and the fifth (Pa) of the raga (scale) being played. The http://www.toddgreen.com/b1947.gif"> large tuners at the top are for basic tuning. There are fine tuners at the bottom for more precise tuning (see close-up.) Sometimes, small pieces of thread are http://www.toddgreen.com/b1945.gif"> placed between the string and the bridge for more sustain and "buzzy" quality to the sound. These traditional tamburas are huge and delicate instruments, which are difficult to travel with. There are smaller versions, the Instrumental Tambura (left side of bottom photo) and the portable Vocal Tambura (right side of bottom picture.)
http://www.toddgreen.com/b1747.gif"> * Any traditional classical Indian music




http://www.toddgreen.com/b_rubab.gif">

http://www.toddgreen.com/b_rubab-neck.gif -
Rubab (Afghanistan/Pakistan/Iran)

An instrument from the lute family, played mostly in Afghanistan and Pakistan. This is a beautiful instrument, carved out of a single piece of mulberry wood. Originally from the Kabul-Ghazni region of Afghanistan, it is regarded as the predecessor of the Indian Sarod. The neck and upper body are hollow and covered with a thin piece of wood. The lower body is covered with skin. The three main playing strings are usually tuned a fourth apart. Though the key of a concert Rubab is usually D, the strings are tuned, low to high, C#, F# and B. In addition, there are 12 to 16 wire sympathetic strings, which are tuned to the scale the raga is in. The lowest and highest of these are on the same plane as the main plucked strings for rhythmic accents. It also has just three tied-on frets and the rest of the fingerboard is fretless. There are three sizes of Rubabs. The two in the picture are the middle and large concert size.
* Ustad Mohammar Omar, Homayun Sakhi, Aziz Herawi

Komuz (Kyrgyzstan/Uzbekistan)

http://www.toddgreen.com/b_komuz_dotar.gif">

The Komuz (left in photo) is the main instrument of Kyrgyz. It is a three-string fretless lute, usually made of apricot wood. It involves many playing techniques, mainly with the right hand including plucking, strumming and striking the string in various rhythmic patters with very stylized hand and arm gestures. The strings are generally all the same gauge but are tuned a, E, a.
* Nurak Abdrakhmanov, Namazbek Uraliev

 

Dotar (Uzbekistan)

The Dotar (right in photo) is popular throughout Central Asia and can be fretless or have tied-on frets like this one. It is also called Tambur or Dombra. Dotar is Persian for "two strings". They are tuned to the tonic and fifth. Traditionally, the body is made of mulberry wood and the neck of apricot wood.
* Abdorahim Hamidov


http://www.toddgreen.com/b1784.gif"> http://www.toddgreen.com/b1966.gif"> Pipa (China)

A string instrument from the lute family, dating back over 2000 years. The Pipa has a unique pear shape, with four large friction tuners. The four silk strings are tuned, low to high, A, D, E, a. There are bamboo frets glued to the belly of the lute. The traditional playing technique includes very fast tremolos, using all of the right hand fingers in succession. The higher quality Pipas have very ornate, hand-carved ivory head-stocks, on this instrument, a dragon (see close-up.)
* Wu Man, Tang Liangxing, He Shu-Feng

 

 

 

http://www.toddgreen.com/b1812.gif">

http://www.toddgreen.com/b1813.gif"> Er-Hu (China)

This is the most widely used bowed instrument in China. It became popular in the Sung dynasty, approx. 1,000 years ago. This instrument only has two playing strings that are suspended above the body. The bow goes between the strings and requires both sides of the hair to be rosined. The sound box is covered with snake skin (see close-up), which gives the instrument its distinctive tone. The more yellowish-beige pigment there is in the skin, the younger the snake was and the better the tone is considered to be. 
* Zhu Changyau, Liu Ying

 

 

http://www.toddgreen.com/b_Matouqin_head.gif"> http://www.toddgreen.com/b_Matouqin.gif"> Matouqin (Mongolia)

The Matouqin ("ma-toe-chin") is a two-string bowed instrument in the range of the Western cello. Traditionally a lot of the instrument was made from different body parts of a horse, including horsehair from the tail for the strings. The modern-day instrument is made of wood with bunches of thin nylon strands making up the strings. string instrument from the lute family, dating back over 2000 years. The Pipa has a unique pear shape, with four large friction tuners. The four silk strings are tuned, low to high, A, D, E, a. There are bamboo frets glued to the belly of the lute. The traditional playing technique includes very fast tremolos, using all of the right hand fingers in succession. The higher quality Pipas have very ornate, hand-carved ivory head-stocks, on this instrument, a dragon (see close-up.)
* Qinggele, Darima


 

 

http://www.toddgreen.com/b1944.gif"> http://www.toddgreen.com/b1942.gif"> Gu Zeng (China)

This beautiful instrument is made from a rare wood in China called zitan (gee-tan) with jade decorative flowers. This is the original Asian zither influencing similar instruments in Japan, Korea and Vietnam. The strings are plucked on the short side of the bridges. You can bend the notes by pushing on the left side of the strings. It is usually tuned to a pentatonic scale.
http://www.toddgreen.com/b1729.gif"> http://www.toddgreen.com/b1733.gif"> * Angela Jui Lee

 

 

 

http://www.toddgreen.com/b_Gu-Qin_bigger.gif"> Gu Qin (China)

The Gu Qin ("chin") is an ancient Chinese instrument renowned for its subtle, tranquil and deep qualities. It has seven strings which are plucked with the right hand as the left hand slides in and out of the melody notes. The entire top is the fingerboard with white position markers called huis ("ways".)

 

http://www.toddgreen.com/b_Ruan_close-up.gif">

http://www.toddgreen.com/b_Ruan_bigger.gif"> Zhong Ruan (China)

A plucked lute instrument with bamboo frets like the Pipa, but with a more guitar-like tone. It comes in three different sizes, this being the middle one. It is tuned G, D, g, d.
* Miao Xiaoyun




http://www.toddgreen.com/b1847.gif"> Charango (Andean region of South America)

This is a ten-string South American mandolin with a very small body. Traditionally, the body was made out of an Armadillo shell, but these days it can also be made out of wood. It has five courses, that are tuned gg, cc, EE, aa, ee. This is a popular instrument in Andean music.
* Sukay, Alejandro Camara, Gustavo Santaolalla

Ronroco (Bolivia)

The Ronroco is the "big brother" of the Charango family. It uses similar tunings to the Charango, but sounds an octave lower. This instrument, like the Charango, was built by Gamboa, one of the premier builders in Bolivia.
* Gustavo Santaolalla

Waylacho (Bolivia)

The Waylacho is the "little brother" of the Charango family. It uses similar tunings to the Charango, but sounds a forth higher.

 

 

Tiple (Venezuela)

http://www.toddgreen.com/b1843.gif"> This is a 12-string, small, guitar-like instrument (left side of photo) played mostly in the northern regions of South America. It has a triple-course set-up of the top four strings of a guitar (D. G, B, E). All the strings but the first one have a lower octave string in the middle of each course.

Requinto (Central and South America)

The Requinto (right side of photo) is also called an alto guitar. This instrument is tuned a fourth higher than a standard guitar. Mostly used for playing melodies in Mexican music. I like to play solo pieces on it.
* Jeff Linsky

 

 

http://www.toddgreen.com/b1845.gif"> Sonqo and Patasi Charango(Bolivia)

Sonqo (left side of photo) in Quechua (the language of Bolivia) means 'heart'. This instrument is a large Charango with one extra octave string in the center course. It is made out of a Bolivian wood called Naranjillo. The Patasi Charango (right side of photo) is a primitive instrument from the Patasi region of Bolivia. It has steel strings instead of the nylon strings of a traditional Charango.

 



http://www.toddgreen.com/b1802.gif"> South American Mandolin

This instrument (left side of picture) is similar in tuning and sound to the western mandolin. The main difference is instead of four double-course strings it has four triple-course strings.

Taro Patch Ukulele

A custom 8-string Ukulele designed by Joe Todaro (see Links) and built in Bolivia. It is a combination of a Ukulele with a Charango-type body, made out of Quinaquina wood, indigenous to Bolivia.

Quatro (Venezuela)

The Quatro (right side of photo) has a re-entrant tuning, which means the low strings are on the top and bottom and the high strings are in the middle. This enables the player to get a similar sound whether strumming up or down. The tuning is A, d, f#, B.

 

 


Valiha (Madagascar, Africa)

http://www.toddgreen.com/b1844.gif"> A tube zither, made out of a large, hollowed-out piece of bamboo, sometimes called a tube harp. It has metal strings, tuned in a two-octave, diatonic scale, that encircle the whole body. I tune mine to a G-maj/E-min scale. The individual strings are tuned with small, movable wooden bridges. The melodies are played by going back and forth between the hands, like a Kalimba (an African thumb piano.) The sound is very similar to that of an Irish folk harp.
* Justin Vali
Photos by Gary Jameson, Reno, NV (775) 825-8999

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Pretty freaking amazing stuff if you ask me. 
 
I'll try to go through more of your list soon.  Thanks a lot, vranakonti!


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Posted By: Menumorut
Date Posted: 27-Jun-2008 at 09:23
Romanian traditional music

The territory inhabited by Romanians was long time separated in three principalities, Transylvania, Moldavia and Wallachia. The musical traditions are very different in each region and in the case of Transylvania there is a total difference between the music of North, South, East (Szekler, Hungarian) and West.

Like in the costumes, it's almost impossible to trace some common characteristics for all Romanian regions.

There is only one elemenent, a type of song, which is common for all Romanians and not met at other people with the exception of Lituanians (this is a proof perhaps of Dacian related traditions of Baltics): Doina, a slow and unrythmed song commonly describing melancholic or sad feelings.

In the domain of dance songs, there is an extraordinary richness and finess. Like Doina, the roots of some melodic lines can trace back to Antiquity and even Prehistory, especialy those in the regions of Northern (mountainous) Wallachia and Northern Transylvania (Maramures). In the other provinces and regions can be distinguished the influences of neighbour peoples: Eastern Slavs in Moldavia, Hungarians in central Transylvania, Germans in Southern Transylvania, Turks in Dobruja, Serbians in Banat.

So the most archaic musical folklore is in Wallachia and Maramures, even if its very different one to other, but it shows an original substrate.


In Romania there is a big industry of folk music, there are hundreds of nationaly-known interprets and thousands local interprets and formations. Some interprets released over 40 albums.


The next are some famous songs or types of songs:

An instrumental Doina from Banat (South West Transylvania)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZ3ujOAxiwY - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZ3ujOAxiwY


Calusarii, a ritual dance with origins in the Roman army. It can be found in several parts of Europe, including Britain (the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morris_dance - Morris dance )
In Romania Calusarii vanished from most regions (but are atested documentary in Moldavia and Transylvania) with the exception of Southern Romania
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ChRmvtNNVSY - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ChRmvtNNVSY


Crisana dances. Crisana is the West Transylvania, with the most rythmed Romanian songs:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I9ot0V8u4BU - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I9ot0V8u4BU



Song from Southern Transylvania (Sibiu county)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=laEUqxyAzhY - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=laEUqxyAzhY


Two songs from Maramures
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_u6XjKH8JeA - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_u6XjKH8JeA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gpTyvgEfMkU&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gpTyvgEfMkU&feature=related



Hora (circle dance) from Bukovina (Northern Moldavia)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UEgi84-PdfA - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UEgi84-PdfA


Song from Teleorman, Plain Wallachia
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CiYd-zg32QI - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CiYd-zg32QI



Turkish influenced song from Dobruja
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aLd9pXMask - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aLd9pXMask



Song from Oltenia (Western Wallachia)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AuT2_ZriaE8 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AuT2_ZriaE8



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Posted By: vranakonti
Date Posted: 27-Jun-2008 at 10:10

Since you brought all that stuff about similar instruments,i can say that the closest parents of cifteli and lute,i know( geographically speaking)  are the Greek Bouzouki http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bouzouki - -  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bouzouki i and the Italian mandolin http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandolin - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandolin ,

Basically the difference between cifteli and Lute is that the first is played with a plectrum and for the second is needed a bow.

This is an interesting comparison ,with their Japanese distant relations.

Japan, Kokyu ,played with a bow,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxTVX0y-_GU&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxTVX0y-_GU&feature=related

Japan, Biwa ,played with a plectrum.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJzJgqaovNU&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJzJgqaovNU&feature=related

 

 

About Polyphony ,here there is another European example, from Sardinia (Italy).

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EsS9xYFKy6c - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EsS9xYFKy6c

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=caNoshxc0b0&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=caNoshxc0b0&feature=related

 

vranakonti,

 

Just clicked on this one http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yhdu9TstjIg&feature=related - rather randomly.  Amazing!

I'm assuming that small metal recorder looking instrument is Flaut?

 

I consider it amazing too,that’s why,it was first in its category,but music is a matter of personal, taste ,so im not sure non-balkanians would like that.About the instrument I think it can be considered a flaut,though its simpler ,in Albanian is called fyell ,or Bilbil ,that means literally whistle. 

 



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Ti Shqipri m ep nder...


Posted By: King Kang of Mu
Date Posted: 27-Jun-2008 at 23:32
Originally posted by Menumorut


Calusarii, a ritual dance with origins in the Roman army. It can be found in several parts of Europe, including Britain (the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morris_dance - Morris dance )
In Romania Calusarii vanished from most regions (but are atested documentary in Moldavia and Transylvania) with the exception of Southern Romania
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ChRmvtNNVSY - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ChRmvtNNVSY  
 
Hello, Menumorut!  Welcome to the thread.
 
When I started the thread with the Bulgarian Women's Choir, I had no idea that would tap into this rich tradition of Balkan culture from all over the region!  That's so wonderful!  Your entire post was very resourceful and enticing about the Romanian tradition.
 
In brief overview, I was really interested the traditional custom clothing in the footages right away.  I can see some Greek influence with the white base color and also similarity with Bulgarian ornamental patterns that I also noticed in Northern Europe namely Finnish, I think.  But I am not an expert on this area either though so don't quote me on it if I'm way off.  And definitely not claiming who influenced who.  And the Baltic connection you've mentioned is also very interesting.  I will look into that later also.  Those soldiers' uniform also remind me lot of the Cromwell era English Musketeers, especially the hat.
 
I will come back on the rest of the samples but I picked the above one for now because a couple of images really intrigued me with my Korean background.
 
At 0:33, there was picture of men seemingly spinning rather fast in squatting position.  I am aware of the Whirling Dance of Sufi tradition but this seemed little different.  It reminded me of this Korean peasants' harvest dancing.  But I'm going by a single frame of the picture so I know I could be way off.  But here is the Korean dance.  Especially check out when they start to spin at 0:46.  Even the colors in their clothing.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gJjAGy3dTdA&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gJjAGy3dTdA&feature=related
 
Second one is some sort of battle marching formation that had a guy standing on the shoulders of other men in formation in your clip which starts at 1:16.  OK the Korean footage I will compare is actually from the 1988 Seoul Olympics opening ceremony.  It's a folk game like mass imitation battle, chicken fight.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tst0TuKNmbw&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tst0TuKNmbw&feature=related  
 
If you find anything similar or interesting please let me know. 
 
I will try to introduce more Korean Folk music and culture later.  I'm also planning on to introduce Mongolian and Tuvan Overtone Throat Singing, Indonesian Gamalan, Sufi Dervish Whirling Dance and more.  I just got caught in the Balkan traditions right now but I want to take my time and take them in as much as I can.  So I really appreciate all the contributions from Bosnian, Albanian, Greek, now Romanian contributions. 
 
Thanks guys. Clap
 
EDIT:  Oh yeah, didn't mean to forget the Latvian contribution from Roberts!  Thanks, RobertsClap
 
 
 
  
 


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Posted By: Menumorut
Date Posted: 28-Jun-2008 at 04:20
The costumes in that footage are basic male costumes from Southern Romania (the male costume is less differentiated across the territory than the woman one) with the exception of that hat and the crossed belts which are part of Calusari costume and which interestingly is found also at the British Morris dancers:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c9/CotswoldMorrisHandkerchiefs20040501_CopyrightKaihsuTai.jpg - http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c9/CotswoldMorrisHandkerchiefs20040501_CopyrightKaihsuTai.jpg


The cut of the Romanian male costume is not of Greek influence, is the costume used from ancestral times in this (and not only) part of Europe by most of the peoples and is atested on the Column of Trajan in the costumes of Dacians (like the woman chemise too). Is found at Romanians, Bulgars, Serbians, Macedonians, Ukrainians etc. Is proper for this climate. The ornamentation is similar to the Bulgarian one because the two people (especialy the Southern Romanians) are neighbour and not excluded to be some ancient reminescences, knowing that both Romanians and Bulgars inherited a part of the Thracian spirit and customs.

The Baltic connection is something sure, the Lithuanians have the same type of song called dainos. Also, the linguists say that Dacian language was closest to Baltic languages.


The dancers spinning rather fast in squatting position may be a not old tradition and may be a coincidence is meet at other peoples. Or it may be something ancient.


About the man on the shoulders of others: after I wrote the message I found that the custom of Calusarii and Morris is pre-Roman, perhaps Dacian dance of fertility, so not a war dance:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%C4%83lu%C5%9Fari - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%C4%83lu%C5%9Fari





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Posted By: King Kang of Mu
Date Posted: 28-Jun-2008 at 04:25
Originally posted by vranakonti

 About Polyphony ,here there is another European example, from Sardinia (Italy).

  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EsS9xYFKy6c - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EsS9xYFKy6c

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=caNoshxc0b0&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=caNoshxc0b0&feature=related

 
Checked out Sardinian example.   First I would like to say, because the Cold War legacy and my own lack of understanding I always forget how close Italy is to Balkan Peninsula.  In other words, how narrow Adriatic Sea is.  I was just looking at the map again, from the back of the boot hill to the nearest coast of Albania, Wiki says, it's less than 72 km.  Also considering that Venice was one of the cultural and trading center of Europe, it would make sense that there are great cultural common denominator Italy and the west coast of Balkan Peninsula.
 
Having said that, Sardinia is in the other side of the Mediterranean Sea.  Now that got me even more interested.  I'm little more familiar of more modern history of Corsica because of Napoleon, and Sicily because of all those mob movies and Frederick II, but I really don't know much about Sardinia and their musical history.  So I looked up in Wiki.
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sardinia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sardinia
......Around the beginning of the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuragic - nuragic age circa http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1500_BC - 1500 BC the island was first called Hyknusa (Latinized Ichnusa) by the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mycenaeans - Mycenaeans , probably meaning island (nusa) of the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyksos - Hyksos , the people who had just been expelled by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahmose_I - Ahmose I of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Egypt - Egypt circa http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1540_BC - 1540 BC . Sandalyon was another name, probably due to its shape, resembling a footprint. Its present name is Sardinia, after the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shardana - Shardana (whose invasion of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egypt - Egypt was defeated by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramesses_III - Ramesses III circa http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1180_BC - 1180 BC ).......
 
......Sardinia is one of the world's most interesting musical destinations. It is home to one of the oldest forms of Vocal Polyphony, generally known as http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Canto_a_Tenores&action=edit&redlink=1 - Canto a Tenores ; several big names of music have found it irresistible, including http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Zappa - Frank Zappa , http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ornette_Coleman - Ornette Coleman , and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Gabriel - Peter Gabriel . The latter travelled to the town of Bitti in the central mountain region, and recorded the now world-famous Tenores di Bitti CD on his Realworld label. The guttural sounds produced in this form make a truly remarkable sound, similar to Tuvan (Mongolia) throat singing. Another polyphonic style of singing, more like the Corsican http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Paghjella&action=edit&redlink=1 - Paghjella and liturgic in nature, is also found in Sardinia and is known as http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Cantu_a_Cuncordu&action=edit&redlink=1 - Cantu a Cuncordu ......
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Wow that's sooooooooo freaky.  I've mentioned Mongolian and Tuvan Overtone Throat singing in my last post.  I've also mentioned that in my second post in this thread on the Bulgarian Women's Choir.  But back then, though it was only several days ago, I've just read about the concept of Polyphony and wondered about how the general meaning of the word 'Overtone' and 'Polyphony' are similar.  And after I tried vranakonti's samples on Sardinian Polyphony, I thought it sounded even more similar to Mongolian /Tuvan Overtone Throat singing only because the lower parts to seem come forward more developed.  Now I look up the history of Sardinia in Wiki because I know almost next to nothing about it, whoop there it is, Tuvan(Mongolian)throat singing!
 
How is that possible?  It's almost as if I knew about the connection already and planned it all along to arrive at this point.  Wow I gotta let this sink in more now.  I was gonna post more sample of Tenores Di Bitti but I just found out those are the same guys in vranakonti's samples already!  Wow! 
 
And this is bit off the topic, Ornette Coleman that is mentioned in above Wiki excerpts, one of my favorite Jazz musician and the father of Free Jazz.  Peter Gabriel and Frank Zappa?  Many of you already know that I'm a huge Prog Rock fan I have a thread for it called 'In the Court of King Kang(New Court Music Needed).  And this thread is actually inspired by from a discussion in that thread and I am approaching it with similar method as if these two are parallel thread. 
 
Wow I'm speechless.  Did I just walk into some Parallel Universe or what?  i assure you i did not plan this.  Well stop the rambling about my strange Wonderland and here are more Tenores Di bitti and other Sardinian Folk music and dance Until I let this sink in and get ready to formally introduce the Mongolian and Tuvan Overtone Throat singing.  Am I going crazy?
 
Tenores di Bitti "Mialinu Pira" in Beograd Serbia with Bilja
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bRgPIQfL0Z4 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bRgPIQfL0Z4
 
Tenores di Bitti Mialinu Pira in Hungary. Debrecen
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HHOVas5Rfmw&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HHOVas5Rfmw&feature=related
 
 
 
Sardinian Folk music at Twys and Dani's wedding (be careful, this one is rather loud)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JspNQZylxks - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JspNQZylxks
 
Elena Ledda - "Mi e La"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zfv1je3im44&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zfv1je3im44&feature=related
 
Ave Maria Sardinian Version
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYRJOqTl74U&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYRJOqTl74U&feature=related
(I picked this one randomly again to show different style of Sadinian folk music with a song I recognize, and what do I see at 0:51?  A Korean Folk painting of Nativity scene!  I don't even know what's going on anymore.  I never did.)    
 


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Posted By: xristar
Date Posted: 03-Jul-2008 at 22:05
Some greek folk music:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8j4VWTI5eVQ - Traditional carnival celebration, from the olympics of 2004 closing ceremony(Macedonia)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5nNX0uegtZg&feature=related - War dance(Pontos)

EDIT: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gyiwWf2_hA8&feature=related - a folk song from Pontos about the fall of Greece/"Romania" (or technically the Byzantine Empire)



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Defeat allows no explanation
Victory needs none.
It insults the dead when you treat life carelessly.


Posted By: King Kang of Mu
Date Posted: 06-Jul-2008 at 07:21
Originally posted by xristar

Some greek folk music:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8j4VWTI5eVQ - Traditional carnival celebration, from the olympics of 2004 closing ceremony(Macedonia)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5nNX0uegtZg&feature=related - War dance(Pontos)

EDIT: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gyiwWf2_hA8&feature=related - a folk song from Pontos about the fall of Greece/"Romania" (or technically the Byzantine Empire)

 
That was cool to see the 2004 Olympics closing ceremony, I missed the first time around.  That golden spiral pattern is also really interesting.  I know it's supposed to be some sort of crop as the women were harvesting it, it seems, but why the spiral pattern?  Is it the Golden Ratio thing?  Reminds me of,
    Then again, it's rather an universal pattern.
 
 
 
Anyway this brings back to Greece before I can move on to Mongolian Tuvan Throat singing.  I wanted to do a brief introduction of Orpheus and Seikilos.
 
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orpheus - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orpheus

Orpheus ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Greek_language - Greek : Ορφεύς; pronounced http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA_for_English - /ˈɔrfiəs/ (OHR-fee-uhs) or /ˈɔrfjuːs/ (OHR'-fews) in English) is a figure from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_mythology - Greek mythology born in the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhodope_Mountains - Rhodope Mountains of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thrace - Thrace (now partly in Bulgaria), king of the Thracian tribe of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cicones - Cicones . His name does not occur in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homer - Homer or http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hesiod - Hesiod , but he was known by the time of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibycus - Ibycus (c.530 BC). Orpheus was called by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pindar - Pindar "the father of songs". He was a son of the Thracian river god Oiagros http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orpheus#cite_note-0 - [1] and the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muse - Muse http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calliope - Calliope , http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orpheus#cite_note-1 - [2] but as http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_Kerenyi - Karl Kerenyi observes, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orpheus#cite_note-2 - [3] "In the popular mind he was more closely linked to the community of his disciples and adherents than with any particular race or family."

The Greeks of the Classical age venerated the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legend - legendary figure of Orpheus as chief among poets and musicians, and the perfector of the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyre - lyre invented by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermes - Hermes . Poets like http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simonides_of_Ceos - Simonides of Ceos said that, with his music and singing, he could charm birds, fishes and wild beasts, coax the trees and rocks into dance, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orpheus#cite_note-3 - [4] and even divert the course of rivers. He was one of the handful of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_hero - Greek heroes http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orpheus#cite_note-4 - [5] to visit the Underworld and return; even in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hades - Hades his song and lyre did not lose their power.

As one of the pioneers of civilization, he is said at various times to have taught humanity the arts of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medicine - medicine , http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Writing - writing (in one unusual instance http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orpheus#cite_note-5 - [6] , where he substitutes for the usual candidate, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadmus - Cadmus ) and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agriculture - agriculture , where he assumes the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eleusinian_Mysteries - Eleusinian role of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triptolemus - Triptolemus . More consistently and more closely connected with religious life, Orpheus was an http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Augur - augur and seer; practised magical arts, especially http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astrology - astrology ; founded or rendered accessible many important cults, such as those of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo - Apollo and the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thracians - Thraco - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phrygia - Phrygian http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orpheus#cite_note-6 - [7] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/God_%28male_deity%29 - god http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dionysus - Dionysus ; instituted mystic rites both public and private; and prescribed initiatory and purificatory rituals, which his community of followers treasured in Orphic texts. In addition, Pindar and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollonius_of_Rhodes - Apollonius of Rhodes http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orpheus#cite_note-7 - [8] place Orpheus as the harpist and companion of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jason_and_the_Argonauts - Jason and the Argonauts .

His son was http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musaeus - Musaeus , "he of the Muses".......

Death of Eurydice
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Cervelli_Orfeo_ed_Euridice.jpg">Orpheus%20and%20Eurydice,%20by%20Federigo%20Cervelli
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Cervelli_Orfeo_ed_Euridice.jpg">
Orpheus and Eurydice, by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federigo_Cervelli - Federigo Cervelli

The most famous story in which Orpheus figures is that of his wife http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurydice - Eurydice (also known as Agriope). While fleeing from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aristaeus - Aristaeus (son of Apollo), Eurydice ran into a nest of snakes which bit her fatally on her heel. Distraught, Orpheus played such sad songs and sang so mournfully that all the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nymph - nymphs and gods wept. On their advice, Orpheus traveled to the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Underworld - underworld and by his music softened the hearts of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hades - Hades and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persephone - Persephone (he was the only person ever to do so), who agreed to allow Eurydice to return with him to earth on one condition: he should walk in front of her and not look back until they both had reached the upper world. In his anxiety he forgot that both needed to be in the upper world, and he turned to look at her, and she vanished for the second time, but now forever. The story in this form belongs to the time of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virgil - Virgil , who first introduces the name of Aristaeus. Other ancient writers, however, speak of Orpheus' visit to the underworld; according to Phaedrus in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plato - Plato 's Symposium ( http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Perseus:text:1999.01.0174:text=Sym.:section=179d - 179d ), the infernal gods only "presented an apparition" of Eurydice to him. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ovid - Ovid says that Eurydice's death was not caused by fleeing from Aristaeus but by dancing with http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naiad - naiads on her wedding day.

The story of Eurydice may actually be a late addition to the Orpheus myths. In particular, the name Eurudike ("she whose justice extends widely") recalls cult-titles attached to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persephone - Persephone . The myth may have been mistakenly derived from another Orpheus legend in which he travels to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tartarus - Tartarus and charms the goddess http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hecate - Hecate .

Main article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Descent_to_the_underworld - Descent to the underworld

The http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Descent_to_the_underworld - Descent to the underworld of Orpheus is paralleled in other versions of a worldwide theme: the Japanese myth of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Izanagi - Izanagi and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Izanami - Izanami , the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akkad - Akkadian / http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sumerian - Sumerian myth of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inanna - Inanna 's Descent to the Underworld, and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maya_mythology - Mayan myth of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ix_Chel - Ix Chel and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Itzamna - Itzamna . The mytheme of not looking back, an essential precaution in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jason - Jason 's raising of chthonic http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hecate - Brimo Hekate under http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medea - Medea 's guidance, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orpheus#cite_note-8 - [9] is reflected in the story of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lot_%28Biblical%29 - Lot 's wife when escaping from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodom - Sodom . The warning of not looking back is also found in the Grimms' folk tale "Hansel and Gretel." More directly, the story of Orpheus is similar to the ancient Greek tales of Persephone captured by Hades and similar stories of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adonis - Adonis captive in the underworld. However, the developed form of the Orpheus myth was entwined with the Orphic mystery cults and, later in Rome, with the development of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mithraism - Mithraism and the cult of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sol_Invictus - Sol Invictus .......

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I don't know how exactly all this fit into Polyphony and other Balkan musical traditions we've looked at.  But I do know his name and the myth has been engraved greatly in the psyche of the Western Classical Music.  Here is one rather famous;
 
Jacques Offenbach: "Orphée aux Enfers" Can can
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g0WRJES4cyw&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g0WRJES4cyw&feature=related
 
I don't know how 'Greek' that was but in musical or many other cultural sense being 'Greek' is being 'Classical Europe' ain't it?  But I do want to dig little deeper and here comes something that could have played in the days of Orpheus.
 
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seikilos_epitaph - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seikilos_epitaph
 

The Seikilos epitaph is the oldest surviving example of a complete musical composition, including musical notation, from anywhere in the world. The song, the melody of which is recorded, alongside its lyrics, in the ancient Greek musical notation, was found engraved on a tombstone, near http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aidin - Aidin , http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkey - Turkey (not far from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ephesus - Ephesus ). The find has been dated variously from around http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/200_BC - 200 BC to around AD http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/100 - 100 .

Also on the tombstone is an indication that states:

I am a tombstone, an icon. Seikilos placed me here as an everlasting sign of deathless remembrance.

While older music with notation exists (for example the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delphic_Hymns - Delphic Hymns ), all of it is in fragments; the Seikilos epitaph is unique in that it is a complete, though short, composition.......

......

There is a tradition of music notation older than the Greek system. A corpus of music fragments recorded on cuneiform tablets goes back to about 2000 B.C. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_music - ancient music .

Some scholars believe that an extant corpus of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_music - Chinese music , first recorded in the Tang dynasty (618-907 AD), predates this work as well as the earlier fragments of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_music - Greek music . This is based on the implausible conjecture that because the recorded examples of Chinese music are ceremonial, and the ceremonies in which they were employed are thought to have existed "perhaps more than one thousand years before Christ" ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._A._Van_Aalst - J. A. Van Aalst ), the musical compositions themselves were performed, even in 1000 BC, in precisely the manner prescribed by the sources that were written down in the seventh century AD. (It is based on this conjecture that Van Aalst dates the "Entrance Hymn for the Emperor" to c. 1000 BC.) Even allowing for the hypothesis that the Emperor's court musicians transmitted these melodies with complete fidelity over sixteen centuries, there is no material evidence to date the composition, or any other piece of Chinese music, to earlier than the Tang dynasty (Pan). This leaves the Epitaph of Seikilos the oldest complete musical composition that can be reliably dated.

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Without further ado here is the oldest recorded music in the world.
 
SEIKILOS EPITAPH 2nd c. AD
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q3ZEzGtO18I - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q3ZEzGtO18I
 
Ancient Greek Music by Seikilos
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w4BSYCUX6ss&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w4BSYCUX6ss&feature=related
 
THE OLDEST COMPLETE PIECE OF MUSIC IN HISTORY!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7KRnAKzFMhk - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7KRnAKzFMhk
 
ANCIENT GREEK MUSIC - "First Delphic Hymn to Apollo"c.138BC
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MMI06AnhtM&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MMI06AnhtM&feature=related
 
I don't know if that moved Trees and rocks to dance but the myth illustrates the power of music and its importance in our lives.


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http://www.allempires.net/forum/forums.html


Posted By: Slayertplsko
Date Posted: 16-Aug-2008 at 08:48
Originally posted by King Kang of Mu

Hmmm, I didn't know that there was such 'dark' history to the song.  Another thing about my childhood memory is also that since Korean language does not have 'F' in their alphabet, 'F' becomes 'P'.  That would make 'Folk' music, 'Po K' music and 'Polka' music becomes 'Po Ka' music.  Now I think about it as I write actually, is the word 'Folk' and 'Polka' related, Etymologically?  That would make sense wouldn't it? 


Well, Polka literally means 'Polish woman' (Polak - 'Polish man') in Polish, Slovak and Czech. The word 'folk' is a common Germanic word and a related Slavic word is 'pluk' (regiment). If we consider Grimm's law of Germanic languages (IE p changes to Germanic f), 'polak' could be related, but I can't find anything that would support it. BUT...

The problem is that the root of 'folk' is just 'folk' itself (Germanic fulka) and the root of polka is just 'pol', whilst the 'k' comes from the suffix. The Polish tribe that gave name to Poles and Poland is called Polanie in Polish. So probably not.

There is one more possible etymology - 'polka' also means 'half' in Slovak and půlka in Czech (what is the meter of polka?Smile). But it probably has nothing to do with people, folk. A folk song is called 'ľudovka' in Slovak, 'lidovka' in Czech (lidová píseň in fact, I'm not sure if they use the short form), 'ludowka' in Polish (muzyka ludowa).

Sorry for this little linguistic postBig%20smileCheers


Posted By: King Kang of Mu
Date Posted: 16-Aug-2008 at 09:25
No, that's perfect, Slayertplsko!  Thanks for your help.  Thanks for bringing this thread back to the surface again too.  This thread was starting to get over my head.  So I took a break from it and hasn't made my way back yet.  Also I can get into only so many music threads at a time.  (excuses, excuses....)  This gives an opportunity to revisit what's been posted and start to rebuild again.  Thanks, Slayertplsko!

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http://www.allempires.net/forum/forums.html


Posted By: Slayertplsko
Date Posted: 21-May-2009 at 20:04

Now, that the thread has been lying here, dead, still and helpless, it's time for resurrection. I'm gonna start with some homophony from Slovakia.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=36TOr2YzHxM - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=36TOr2YzHxM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y40RXRaKAQo&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y40RXRaKAQo&feature=related

I could try to get more, but not much is on YouTube. Actually this might be a good comparison to other homophonic or polyphonic songs from various parts of the world.



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A mind is like a parachute. It doesn't work if it's not open.


Posted By: GökTürk
Date Posted: 21-May-2009 at 20:26
Click for Mongolian and Tuvanian Turkish Folk Music:
http://shamanturk.sitemynet.com - http://shamanturk.sitemynet.com
(the site is in turkish but u can find anything easily,cuz there is links and musicians' names in site.)





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TENGRİ TEG TENGRİDE BOLMIŞ TÜRK BİLGE KAĞAN-
TURK WISE KHAN WHO BECAME IN SKY LIKE SKY-GOD
---
tengir ordo(people of Tengri-God-)                 


Posted By: Slayertplsko
Date Posted: 21-May-2009 at 20:46
Originally posted by GökTürk

Click for Mongolian and Tuvanian Turkish Folk Music:
http://shamanturk.sitemynet.com - http://shamanturk.sitemynet.com

(the site is in turkish but u can find anything easily,cuz there is links and musicians' names in site.)

Thanks, GökTürk!

I always wanted to listen to some Turkic Central Asian music, but somehow had no luck in finding anything. I'm looking forward to it. It seems I have to download it, so it'll take me a while to get trough all of it. I'll write my impressions as soon as possible and contribute with another bunch of folk music.

Keep it coming.Smile



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A mind is like a parachute. It doesn't work if it's not open.


Posted By: GökTürk
Date Posted: 21-May-2009 at 20:52
Originally posted by Slayertplsko

Originally posted by GökTürk

Click for Mongolian and Tuvanian Turkish Folk Music:
http://shamanturk.sitemynet.com - http://shamanturk.sitemynet.com

(the site is in turkish but u can find anything easily,cuz there is links and musicians' names in site.)

Thanks, GökTürk!

I always wanted to listen to some Turkic Central Asian music, but somehow had no luck in finding anything. I'm looking forward to it. It seems I have to download it, so it'll take me a while to get trough all of it. I'll write my impressions as soon as possible and contribute with another bunch of folk music.

Keep it coming.Smile



Your Wellcome ,Homie Smile!
You must start to download Huun Huur Tu - Altai Sayan Tandy-Uula...There is 6 songs in the album.My favourite songs are "Kojamk" and "Kongurai"...

If u want more,just post me a pm,cuz i like this too and the site is mine Big smile ..



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TENGRİ TEG TENGRİDE BOLMIŞ TÜRK BİLGE KAĞAN-
TURK WISE KHAN WHO BECAME IN SKY LIKE SKY-GOD
---
tengir ordo(people of Tengri-God-)                 


Posted By: Slayertplsko
Date Posted: 21-May-2009 at 21:17
I've just downloaded AltaiKai. Sounds great, but isn't it already influenced by western music??

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A mind is like a parachute. It doesn't work if it's not open.


Posted By: whalebreath
Date Posted: 22-May-2009 at 05:54
This Ukrainian female vocal quintet is a favourite of mine

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NBdehrmkVlM&feature=related - Ukrania

Some polyphonic singing from 4 of them here

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZitE2iyC5S4&feature=related - Click Here


Posted By: GökTürk
Date Posted: 22-May-2009 at 15:27
Originally posted by Slayertplsko

I've just downloaded AltaiKai. Sounds great, but isn't it already influenced by western music??

Yeah,some sounds and instruments are similar.So Native American Culture and Central Asia Turkic culture are suprisinly similar.
Example this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IRjkg91VE2o&feature=channel_page - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IRjkg91VE2o&feature=channel_page

 Name of this Turkic [Tuva] instrument is "Temur Komuz".It's one of Turk's oldest instruments.
Also You can this voice in a western film :D

I were very suprised when I have listened the songs,too.





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TENGRİ TEG TENGRİDE BOLMIŞ TÜRK BİLGE KAĞAN-
TURK WISE KHAN WHO BECAME IN SKY LIKE SKY-GOD
---
tengir ordo(people of Tengri-God-)                 


Posted By: Slayertplsko
Date Posted: 22-May-2009 at 15:50

Originally posted by GökTürk

Yeah,some sounds and instruments are similar.So Native American Culture and Central Asia Turkic culture are suprisinly similar.

It seems you misunderstood me. I didn't mean western music as a term applied to the supposed music of Wild West, but western music in general - i.e. everything that is nowadays produced in Europe and America. I was just surprised that there was an actual harmonic cadence in the song, expecially in the first one, that was similar to those used in some popular music today (the roots of which could be found in Africa and also Latin American music and then in Spain and so on). So I thought it was some kind of a fusion of traditional Turkic music and contemporary popular music. But then, it is also possible that it is a feature of Asian traditional music, as well as of some contemporary music. And since I'm not much familiar with world music it confused me.

Originally posted by GökTürk

Name of this Turkic [Tuva] instrument is "Temur Komuz".It's one of Turk's oldest instruments.

Also You can this voice in a western film :D


I am familiar with the instrument but have never seen it in western film. It is also called Jew's harp and it is one of the oldest instruments, quite widespread. For instance, it is used in Scandinavian folk music and was also used by some Scandinavian metal bands, namely Bathory.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fbtb6Rrrvks - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fbtb6Rrrvks

You can hear it in the very beginning. They made a more extensive used of it, but I can't find anything right now.

Anyway, I listened to Huun Huur Tu yesterday and it was much much better than AltaiKai. And if I was suspicious about the purity of AltaiKai, that's nonexistent here. What is especially interesting is the kind of throat singing used in this music. I can't figure out how it is done.



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A mind is like a parachute. It doesn't work if it's not open.


Posted By: GökTürk
Date Posted: 22-May-2009 at 18:28


Originally posted by Slayertplsko

  ..it is also possible that it is a feature of Asian traditional music, as well as of some contemporary music...

I dont know how the real central music is.I dont search it.But it can,for me.So Dangaa Kosyabar's a lot of songs are Electro/techno.



Originally posted by Slayertplsko

I am familiar with the instrument but have never seen it in western film. It is also called Jew's harp and it is one of the oldest instruments, quite widespread. For instance, it is used in Scandinavian folk music and was also used by some Scandinavian metal bands, namely Bathory.



Voice of Jew's harp is deeper than Temur.I dont know view of Jew's harp,but Temur has been invented by Turks.



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TENGRİ TEG TENGRİDE BOLMIŞ TÜRK BİLGE KAĞAN-
TURK WISE KHAN WHO BECAME IN SKY LIKE SKY-GOD
---
tengir ordo(people of Tengri-God-)                 


Posted By: Carcharodon
Date Posted: 22-May-2009 at 20:02
Some traditional folk music from  Sweden
 
Linnea Fredricson playes folk music in Lärbro church, Gotland year 2007.
Groddvalsen with Maria Wernberg and Groddpolskan, solo.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMwg5vTcfR0 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMwg5vTcfR0
 
Midsummer in Sweden:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iOMQqAfYj5c - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iOMQqAfYj5c
 
Sampling of folk music experience in Sweden during the summer of 2006:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MaONBn8AZPY&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MaONBn8AZPY&feature=related
 
Folkdance and folkmusic in the midsummer:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSXBmbY5n2o - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSXBmbY5n2o
 
The old instrument psalmodikon:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FooaX6GjEl0 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FooaX6GjEl0
 
The old instrument nyckelharpa
A small movie about the Swedish instrument, nyckelharpa. The tune in the background is "Löftet" (The Promise), original tune played and produced by Maria L Hallengren By Maria L Hallengren:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EK88Vf6pTIU - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EK88Vf6pTIU
 
More nyckelharpa:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2Moat30QzI - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2Moat30QzI
 
Häxritten (ride of the witches) played by Tore Härdelin:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eqrucpoe26U&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eqrucpoe26U&feature=related
 
The instrument spilåpipa:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rmPWYaDYvgU - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rmPWYaDYvgU
 
Vallåtar
This is the old way of herding live stock (in the middle of north Sweden) and of communication between herding women on mountains and between them and the home places down in the valley:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hyfdkvvzyzQ - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hyfdkvvzyzQ
 
 
 
 
  Swedish folkmusic
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 24-Aug-2011 at 01:46
Traditional Mongolian music and dance:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7TXio36u7g&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7TXio36u7g&feature=related




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Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 25-Aug-2011 at 03:11
Emir Kostuca "Mesecina" from the movie "Underground"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r87CWLsBORE - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r87CWLsBORE


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Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 31-Aug-2011 at 21:01
A Gypsy song "Caje Sukarije":
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cde1EvtrKgU&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cde1EvtrKgU&feature=related


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Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 10-Oct-2011 at 02:47
Two ancient Russian Gypsy songs:
[TUBE]ffiEAmbwehs&feature=related[/TUBE]




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Posted By: shenglu
Date Posted: 04-Nov-2011 at 00:07
It said: "One Sunday morning, the war reached down Droviani; Come, let us go there, you see what happened, how the Greeks of the blood has been spilled."

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http://www.meritline.com/led-flashlight---c-7832.aspx - LED Flashlights


Posted By: medenaywe
Date Posted: 04-Nov-2011 at 02:07
spam flashlights.


Posted By: Menumorut
Date Posted: 15-Nov-2011 at 19:47
Amazing song and dance from Albania. It's name means something in connection with the firefly:

[tube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nl2ssrn-vRs[/tube]


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http://img210.imageshack.us/img210/3992/10ms4.jpg">



Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 18-Dec-2011 at 20:59
Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan:
[TUBE]IcOXVdO1sf8&feature=related[/TUBE]


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Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 19-Dec-2011 at 19:22
[TUBE]BDsWMDxfgo8&related[/TUBE]

[TUBE]w8Y6oDu8lmA&related[/TUBE]


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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 22-Dec-2011 at 13:19
[TUBE]PetBFKdvM4Q&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 23-Dec-2011 at 18:20
[TUBE]vgBoXDnFAD8&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 24-Dec-2011 at 13:37
[TUBE]KQ5ZU1HDPLQ&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 24-Dec-2011 at 19:34

http://youtu.be/fvNkNJrcewM - [TUBE]fvNkNJrcewM&related[/TUBE]

http://youtu.be/ZJoCQcNFwwQ - [TUBE]ZJoCQcNFwwQ&related[/TUBE]

http://youtu.be/USMVJQdsim8 - [TUBE]USMVJQdsim8&related[/TUBE]




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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 30-Dec-2011 at 20:34
[TUBE]CXe8xOnU4Ys&related[/TUBE]

[TUBE]9tA-gKDOxYU&related[/TUBE]

[TUBE]bdyP-f1zFew&related[/TUBE]

[TUBE]oZ23h2MdgHQ&related[/TUBE]

[TUBE]4QfjG9V4-zE&related[/TUBE]

[TUBE]Stme5Xb_Y1U&related[/TUBE]




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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 31-Dec-2011 at 06:04
[TUBE]aYiHg-a87hk&related[/TUBE]




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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 02-Jan-2012 at 06:58
I've just found this Russian singer, Vladimir Visotsky, and I like the sound of his work. This one I've found I also have a translation for the song too.

[TUBE]v-qzHBYBO6Y&related[/TUBE]

"In the yellow and hot Africa,
In its very central part,
A disaster managed to take place
Outside of approved schedule.

The Elephant, not making anything of it,
Hinted that a flood was sure to come.
Here it is: a giraffe
Fell in love with an antelope.

Such a hubbub and barking arose
And only the old Parrot
Yelled loudly from the branches:
"The giraffe is big, he knows best!"

"So what if she's got horns?"
Cried the giraffe lovingly.
"Nowadays in our fauna
Everyone is politically correct.
And if my folks and kin
Don't make it good for her -
Just try blaming it on me, you hear? -
I will leave the herd."

Such a hubbub and barking arose
And only the old Parrot
Yelled loudly from the branches:
"The giraffe is big, he knows best!"

Father of the antelope -
Why would he want such a son?
And giraffe's son-in-law grumbles -
"He is a moron, I'll tell you, a moron!"
So the antelope and giraffe
Went to live with bison.

Such a hubbub and barking arose
And only the old Parrot
Yelled loudly from the branches:
"The giraffe is big, he knows best!"

In the yellow and hot Africa,
The idyll has seen it's last days.
The giraffe and his wife
Are shedding crocodile tears, -
But nothing can help their trouble -
Now, there is no law, whatsoever:
Giraffe's daughter
Married a bison!

Sure, maybe the giraffe wasn't right, -
But there is no way he was guilty -
Guilty was the one, who yelled from the branches:
"Giraffe is big, he knows best!"







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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 02-Jan-2012 at 07:03
[TUBE]Vj3pd-a-js8&related[/TUBE]

In my dream - yellow lights,
wheezing in my sleep;
a while longer, a whole longer,
In the morning I'll be fine!

But in the morning everything's wrong,
The joy is gone;
Either you smoke on an empty stomach,
Or you quench a hangover.

Hey one, yes
once again;
Hey one, yes
many-many more times...

In the bars; green tablecloths
And white napkins.
Heaven for the poor and slobs,
But for me - like a bird in a cage!

In the church; stench and gloom,
Preachers burning incense.
No! Even in church everything's wrong,
Not as it should be.

To the mountain I rush,
So that something there might be,
On the mountain stands an alder,
While below a cherry tree;
If only there were ivy on the slope;
I'd get some joy from it,
If only anything else;
It's not as it should be.

Hey one, yes
once again;
Hey one, yes
many-many more times...

Then to the field I go,
along the river bank;
Some light, some darkness - but no God!
While in the pure field; 
there are cornflowers and a distant road.
Along the road there's a deep forest
With Baba-Yaga witches;
And at the road's end;
Chopping blocks and axes.

Somewhere the stallions dance in tune,
Unhurried and easy.
Along the road everything is wrong,
But at the end; completely.

Neither in church nor the in the bar-
Nothing is held holy!
No, my friends; everything's wrong,
Everything's wrong, my friends!

Hey one, yes
once again;
Hey one, yes
many-many more times...


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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 04-Jan-2012 at 06:56
[TUBE]nl2ssrn-vRs&related[/TUBE]

[TUBE]hqOq97M1YE0&related[/TUBE]


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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 06-Jan-2012 at 09:41
This kind of music makes the hairs on the back of my neck stand.Smile

[TUBE]NVkl9ubALBc&related[/TUBE]


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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 06-Jan-2012 at 09:59
[TUBE]Scus9teTdjo&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 07-Jan-2012 at 16:11
[TUBE]b_aCO3J4hJk&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 07-Jan-2012 at 16:19
[TUBE]CzDndU8ZG0Q&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 09-Jan-2012 at 16:02
[TUBE]cyHX0FUr-Y4&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 14-Jan-2012 at 11:11
[TUBE]8CnhcGpmH9Y&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 15-Jan-2012 at 11:05
[TUBE]7yVgnpR-Z4U&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 18-Jan-2012 at 06:38
[TUBE]MvDsfLiWwpo&related[/TUBE]




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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 18-Jan-2012 at 06:43
[TUBE]CCSoSwKN1zc&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 21-Jan-2012 at 09:53
I have a real love for the bagpipes, and I think these Bulgarian bagpipe plays are fantastic.

[TUBE]Mu-Mw6j3RWw&related[/TUBE]


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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 24-Jan-2012 at 23:24
[TUBE]EBZL86nAMnM&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 25-Jan-2012 at 15:55
[TUBE]1Z2xsti-UFo&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 26-Jan-2012 at 15:37
[TUBE]3GhE_lUQrok&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 28-Jan-2012 at 05:39
[TUBE]Yng0n_-_UV0&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 29-Jan-2012 at 08:06
[TUBE]3s6JYopInbo&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 30-Jan-2012 at 17:16
[TUBE]0aVwdNwRkp4&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 30-Jan-2012 at 23:22
[TUBE]Ok0ijgLG5uo&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 02-Feb-2012 at 15:09
[TUBE]5QclnG8s-gQ&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 07-Feb-2012 at 00:55
[TUBE]R39znfxcrvM&feature=related[/TUBE]


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Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 07-Feb-2012 at 01:29
[TUBE]0ZzFtoMOuTg&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 09-Feb-2012 at 00:50
[TUBE]qn06W-iBfkQ[/TUBE]


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Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 11-Feb-2012 at 12:14
[TUBE]wRSbPtWjJHU&related[/TUBE]

[TUBE]GneEooWypS4&related[/TUBE]




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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 14-Feb-2012 at 16:21
[TUBE]hA2pgEUnrM8&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 14-Feb-2012 at 23:02
[TUBE]LXXBfL5lRqE[/TUBE]


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Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 16-Feb-2012 at 11:06
[TUBE]L0ntCJ4Ofw0&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 18-Feb-2012 at 09:11
[TUBE]Ix-_3JhHjcA&related[/TUBE]

[TUBE]46WW3D5a_TU&related[/TUBE]

[TUBE]-qA7GDkKZJk&related[/TUBE]




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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 21-Feb-2012 at 08:41
[TUBE]Fy9rOglv8r8&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 25-Feb-2012 at 07:39
[TUBE]sC2yEFpacIE&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 02-Mar-2012 at 03:08
[TUBE]CohGAgmXr0s[/TUBE]


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Posted By: TheAlaniDragonRising
Date Posted: 06-Mar-2012 at 16:56
[TUBE]NMriWFvFIBc&related[/TUBE]

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What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.


Posted By: Don Quixote
Date Posted: 07-Mar-2012 at 22:47
[TUBE]-qA7GDkKZJk&feature=related[/TUBE]


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