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Iran - Turkey deal

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  Quote mamikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Iran - Turkey deal
    Posted: 13-Mar-2006 at 21:10
"ran offers Turkey to hold works to enrich uranium or process nuclear fuel in its territory. Teheran also invites MPs and journalists from Turkey to visit Iranian nuclear objects. We trust Turkey more. We can discuss those initiatives as part of the package of initiatives. As it is known, disputes refer to concentration of uranium, processing nuclear fuel and not only these matters. It would be better for us if one of the initiatives is implemented in the Turkish territory, Iranian Ambassador to Turkey Firuz Devletabadi. In his words, the issue has technical and legal sides. We are for involving Turkey in the process. We simultaneously invite Turkey and its companies to participate in implementation of our nuclear projects, the Iranian Ambassador to Ankara said.

Official Ankara has many times expressed concern over implementation of nuclear programs by Iran and urged to observe conventional international norms. Turkey also indicated negative consequences for the international community in case of a military operation against its neighbor, reports Yeni Safak Turkish newspaper."


is this a joke?  
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  Quote Iranian41ife Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13-Mar-2006 at 21:20

iran right now is doing everything it can do make its peaceful program legitimate, and undermine US pressure.

 

"If they attack Iran, of course I will fight. But I will be fighting to defend Iran... my land. I will not be fighting for the government and the nuclear cause." ~ Hamid, veteran of the Iran Iraq War
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  Quote Seko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13-Mar-2006 at 22:01

Looks like a way to take the heat off of Iran and displace the issue by trying to involve a neighbor country.

Other news from the Turkish press.

Bush ties Iran to deadly Iraq bombs
US President George W. Bush, stepping up a war of words with Iran, accused Tehran of contributing to ever-deadlier roadside bombs used against US-led forces and civilians in Iraq.

 

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  Quote pikeshot1600 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2006 at 09:02
Originally posted by prsn41ife

iran right now is doing everything it can do make its peaceful program legitimate, and undermine US pressure.

 

More like desperation.  Turkey has nothing in common with turds in turbans.  Turkish-Iranian relations were pretty cordial before the mullahs.  Not so in recent years.

Russia offers its good offices to negotiate and gets poked in the eye by the regime.  Not too bright.  They just diplomatically hosed the closest power they have to a "friend."  (although Russia looks at Iran as a snake in a basket)

 

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  Quote mamikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2006 at 09:20
the discussions with Russia broke off?
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  Quote pikeshot1600 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2006 at 10:05

Originally posted by mamikon

the discussions with Russia broke off?

Don't think they broke off, but Iran is not cooperating, and the Russians are getting frustrated.  Stalling seems to be their negotiating position, so it may have to go to the Security Council.

I think the Russians are acting in good faith because (paradoxically) they don't want Iran to have the ability to enrich plutonium either.  Iran trying to hide their intentions?  No, surely not.

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  Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2006 at 10:31

Definately a good idea it would be a good inroad to co-operation between the two countries, no doubt we will soon see geopolitical rifts wedged open soon enough between the two countries.

Originally posted by pikeshot1600

Turkey has nothing in common with turds in turbans.  

"Turds in turbans"? Turbans are part of traditional dress throughout the region, including Turkey and are not exclusive to Mullahs or Imams. Just look at the portraits of Ottoman sultans.

Believe it or not, some mullahs are good people - upwards of 100 ayatollahs have been executed or murdered by the IRI since 1979.  You should keep your ignorance to yourself.

Many officials (especially nationalist/military) in Turkey believe that the government should abandon its policies in moving towards the EU and strengthen its economic ties with its Eastern neighbours, which include, among others, Iran.

Furthermore, how is it a move of desperation? It is an acceptable suggestion, it is little different to the previous proposals to have the uranium enriched in Russia, which were backed by the IAEA and other major players.

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  Quote DayI Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2006 at 11:41

Iran suggests nuclear enrichment in Turkey


Iran has greater confidence in Turkey than Western actors and is ready to discuss carrying out some of its sensitive nuclear activity on Turkish soil, as part of a package aiming to create more confidence in the international community, Iranian Ambassador Firooz Dowlatabadi told The New Anatolian on Monday.

Talks between Russia and Iran on a proposal for joint uranium enrichment in Russian soil failed to produce an agreement on Monday. But the Iranian government said that they welcome any proposal that will preserve Iran's right to pursue peaceful nuclear energy and allay the concerns of certain Western states.

Iranian Ambassador Dowlatabadi, speaking exclusively with TNA, stressed that Iran is ready to discuss several suggestions for confidence-building on Iran's nuclear program and added:

"We have much more confidence in Turkey. We can discuss these suggestions as part of a package. As you know the discussion includes nuclear enrichment, developing nuclear fuel, but is not limited to that. If any of these would be on Turkish soil, it would be better for us. The issue has technical and legal aspects and can be further discussed in detail by the experts. But as I have said we are ready to discuss Turkey's involvement in this process."

Ambassador Dowlatabadi, before heading to Tehran on Monday for consultations, spoke with TNA about Iran's nuclear program, Turkish-Iranian relations and recent developments in Iraq.

Here's what Dowlatabadi had to tell us:

TNA: Mr. Ambassador, the Turkish government has been criticized by several U.S. and European Union officials for being "too soft" against Iran concerning its nuclear program, which they described also as a threat to Turkey's own security. How does Iran view the policy of the Turkish government so far on the Iranian nuclear program?

DOWLATABADI: Well, Turkey's policy so far has been an acceptable one. I can tell you that we expect our Turkish brothers and friends to double-check all the information that they receive either from the U.S., Israel or some other countries concerning our nuclear program. Because so far, much of the information they were given was distorted and manipulated. Especially the data delivered by the U.S. ambassador to the IAEA on his recent visit to Ankara.

TNA: Turkish Foreign Minister Abdullah Gul, following a meeting with his German counterpart late last month, urged Iran to be more transparent and in full cooperation with the UN's watchdog on its nuclear program. How do you see these suggestions, are you going to consider them?

DOWLATABADI: This expectation to be more transparent on our nuclear program is in parallel with the expectations raised by various other countries. And we are doing our ut most to be as transparent as possible concerning our nuclear program. But we also expect others like the U.S. and Israel also to be transparent with their nuclear programs. We have called on the Turkish side, diplomats, parliamentarians, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and the media to come and visit our nuclear facilities and learn about our program. Now we're waiting for a possible visit from Turkish parliamentarians and I hope that this visit will be realized soon.

TNA: Are there some guarantees given by Tehran to Ankara concerning the nuclear program, that it will by no means be a threat to Turkey?

DOWLATABADI: First of all, I have to recall that Iran's nuclear program has never had a military dimension. Indeed this fact has been accepted by IAEA head Mohamed ElBaradei several times. Secondly, our countries signed a very significant security agreement in 2004, during the visit of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan. And accordingly, Iran views that Turkey's security is also Iran's security. As you know the Turkish-Iranian border has remained unchanged over the past 1,000 year. During the time of the founder of the Turkish Republic Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, Iran agreed to make some geopolitical territorial revisions on our border, which opened Turkey a sphere towards the Caucasus and Central Asia. Last but not least, don't forget our fight against the PKK (terrorist Kurdistan Workers' Party). We Iranians gave martyrs in the struggle against the PKK. After all, can you tell me any other two countries in the world which have such strong bonds? This shows nothing but the very fact that Iran and Turkey are not a threat to each other, on the contrary they provide mutual security to each other. What can be a better guarantee for Turkey then that?

On the other hand, look at what the U.S. and Israel are doing. The Americans are, despite their strength in Iraq, doing nothing against the PKK but supporting them. It is the Americans and Israel who also aim for a civil and sectarian war in Iraq. These are the things which constitute real threats to Turkey's national security. Israel's national security paper, which has been kept secret, foresees that Turkey should be kept weak in the region. Because Israel believes that its existence today is due to the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and today they fear Turkey becoming stronger in the region. They try to be nice to Turkey on the outside, but behind closed doors they develop sinister plots against Turkey.

The U.S. doesn't want any strong Muslim country in the region and aims for division of Turkey, Iran, and Saudi Arabia in the long run, through well-developed plans.

TNA: It's not only the U.S. and Israel but also several other European countries who express concern that Iran's real aim might be to develop a nuclear bomb. But you're saying that it is totally out of the question. So what do you think that the real aim of the Western pressure on Iran's nuclear program aims for?

DOWLATABADI: I believe that behind that there is the strong tendency in the Islamic world towards stronger economic and scientific capacity which raises concern among them. They know that no country can achieve success in the highly competitive global world without achieving nuclear technology. Nuclear technology is becoming more and more important in the fields of energy, health and even agriculture. And they're trying to prevent us from reaching that technology.

TNA: Without a doubt, there is a large gap of confidence with the Western states and Iran on this nuclear program issue. Don't you think some formulas can be found, such as Iran temporarily doing this nuclear enrichment outside its borders, under an international guarantee, also with the involvement of several reliable countries? And also, what do you think about Turkey's involvement?

DOWLATABADI: Yes there is a problem of a lack of confidence, but this is not because of us, but because of the U.S. and Israel. The UN has all the means for inspection of the nuclear sites and the activities in Iran. But look at the U.S., it is the only country which has used a nuclear weapon so far and it still continues violating its commitments by doing nothing to reduce the number of its nuclear weapons. Israel moreover has no cooperation with the UN, it has nuclear weapons and continues its nuclear activities without any inspection by the UN at all. It continues aggressive policies against its neighbors. And we're talking about confidence-building, so why doesn't Israel have such a responsibility?

Now, we are part of international agreements and we will continue to fulfill our responsibilities. And we still think that some of the suggestions for confidence-building can be further discussed. We have much more confidence in Turkey. We can discuss these suggestions as part of a package. As you know, the discussion includes nuclear enrichment, developing nuclear fuel, but is not limited to that. If any of this would be on Turkish soil, it would be better for us. The issue has technical and legal aspects and can be further discussed in detail by the experts. But as I have said we are ready to discuss Turkey's involvement in this process. We are also calling on the Turkish side and companies to enter into nuclear projects inside Iran.

TNA: Another important issue in our region is Iraq, and recently Turkish Foreign Minister Abdullah Gul was quoted by his Czech counterpart as saying that if the U.S.-led coalition forces were to leave Iraq, then an Iranian-type radical Islam would be strengthened in Iraq and then Tehran would also be able to export this to Turkey. Have you asked for a clarification from the Turkish side? Is there really a competition between Ankara and Tehran on the Iraq issue?

DOWLATABADI: No, we haven't sought any clarification. We already knew that these supposed statements had no foundation and Mr. Gul already denied it. I have to tell you that today between Iran and Turkey today the very best cooperation is on Iraq. We favor the unity and territorial integrity of Iraq, and so does Turkey. We want all ethnic and religious groups to be represented in the government, which is also what Turkey wants. We are supporting Kurds taking part in the central government and we want this central government to be strengthened, and Turkey also is advocating that. Last but not least, we want the withdrawal of foreign troops from Iraq, and Turkey with some reservations supports this idea. How can we talk about disagreements after all that?

TNA: Mr. Ambassador, today you are leaving Ankara for regular consultations with Tehran. Lastly, I want to ask you this: What main impressions and ideas will you convey to Tehran?

DOWLATABADI: Without a doubt, Turkey is willing to further develop relations with Iran. Turkey wants a peaceful and democratic solution to the nuclear standoff. And Turkey shares with us the desire to further continue our mutual high-level visits.


http://www.abhaber.com/news_page.asp?id=2350 
this is better
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  Quote DayI Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2006 at 11:42
Energy, Iran Spur Turkey's Revival of Nuclear Plans


By Karl Vick
Washington Post Foreign Service
Tuesday, March 7, 2006; Page A14

ISTANBUL -- Turkey is reviving its long-deferred quest for nuclear power, pressed both by serious energy shortfalls within its own borders and by strident nuclear ambitions in neighboring Iran that threaten to upset a regional balance of power.

"The rise in oil prices and the need for multiple sources of energy make our need for nuclear energy an utmost priority," Energy Minister Hilmi Guler said last month in announcing plans to build as many as five atomic energy plants. The first, to be located on the Black Sea at Sinop, would come on line in 2012 and ease Turkey's costly dependence on natural gas, 90 percent of which arrives by pipeline from Russia and Iran.

With a rapidly expanding economy, a population of 70 million and scarce petroleum deposits, Turkey appears to be a logical candidate for nuclear power. Guler, who made his remarks while visiting a nuclear plant in Virginia, said the new Turkish reactors could provide about a tenth of the 54,000 megawatts the country expects to need over the next two decades.

"Turkey is a very poor country in respect to power. This has made the country very vulnerable," said Fatih Birol, chief international economist at the energy agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, a cooperative of 30 countries that fosters good governance. Birol said that after briefing Turkey's foreign and energy ministers in recent weeks, "I think this government is rather determined to go ahead."

Neighboring Iran's nuclear program, which the United States and other countries have called a cover for developing nuclear weapons, also looms over the revival of Turkey's program, which has had numerous false starts since the early 1960s. Iran and Turkey are almost identical in population and economy and regard each other roughly as equals in a famously combustible region with no dominant power.

"Iran with nuclear production will be the dominant power," said Ozdem Sanberk, a former ambassador to Washington who heads the Turkish Economic and Social Studies research group in Istanbul. "There will be an asymmetrical relationship."

Sanberk has argued recently that Turkey has no choice but to pursue a nuclear program of its own under the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

"If we want to leave an independent country to our future generations, we do not have the luxury to delay," Sanberk wrote.

U.S. officials are trying to use Turkey's unease over developments in Iran as part of international efforts to persuade Tehran to suspend its nuclear program. Last month, the U.S. ambassador to the International Atomic Energy Agency, Greg Schulte, spent two days in Ankara for what the U.S. Embassy described as "intense dialogue and cooperation" on the Iranian question. Senior officials of Turkey's ruling Justice and Development Party, whose roots in Islam afford some entree with Tehran, lately have turned up the volume. Foreign Minister Abdullah Gul said Turkey was "saddened by Iran's restarting uranium enrichment."

Any Turkish move toward a nuclear weapons program would mark a dramatic departure from long-standing foreign policy and military doctrine. Guided by the slogan of the country's founder, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, "Peace at home, peace in the world," Turkish diplomats and the powerful general staff have invested heavily in international institutions, deploying troops repeatedly to Afghanistan and ratifying the most stringent additions to the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

"Turkey's state policy is always: Play the game within the rules," said Mustafa Kibaroglu, a nuclear proliferation expert at Bilkent University in Ankara. But "if Iran goes nuclear, then who knows?"

In the past, Kibaroglu saw merit in a domestic nuclear industry for Turkey. In a recent interview, however, he argued for alternatives, including improvements to the electrical grid, which leaks as much as a quarter of the power it produces.

"I'm not supporting Turkey's nuclear energy program anymore," he said, "because I'm not clear about what the real intention is. Let's put it that way."



http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...030601513.html 
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  Quote Lmprs Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2006 at 12:03
Originally posted by Zagros

Many officials (especially nationalist/military) in Turkey believe that the government should abandon its policies in moving towards the EU and strengthen its economic ties with its Eastern neighbours, which include, among others, Iran.

Can you give some examples?
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  Quote DayI Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2006 at 12:09
Originally posted by barish

Originally posted by Zagros

Many officials (especially nationalist/military) in Turkey believe that the government should abandon its policies in moving towards the EU and strengthen its economic ties with its Eastern neighbours, which include, among others, Iran.

Can you give some examples?
i know of the military, but dont know of the government. Our military wants nuclear tech, you can clearly analyze it of their speeches and the biggest supporters of nuclear energy in Turkey whas the TSK.
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  Quote Lmprs Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2006 at 12:17
I really doubt if there is a single supporter of Iran - Turkey relations in the Turkish army.
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  Quote DayI Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2006 at 12:40
Originally posted by barish

I really doubt if there is a single supporter of Iran - Turkey relations in the Turkish army.
well you should know, some neighbours has nuclear weapons capacity, so if Turkey wants to be a "great" power in middle east he should have them too.
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  Quote Lmprs Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2006 at 12:47
Originally posted by DayI

well you should know, some neighbours has nuclear weapons capacity, so if Turkey wants to be a "great" power in middle east he should have them too.

Nuclear energy through Iran? No thanks.
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  Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2006 at 13:01

Originally posted by barish

Originally posted by Zagros

Many officials (especially nationalist/military) in Turkey believe that the government should abandon its policies in moving towards the EU and strengthen its economic ties with its Eastern neighbours, which include, among others, Iran.

Can you give some examples?

Not off the top of my head and I don't have the time to find the article, I read it sometime last year, it was a geenral frustrated witht he way EU treats Turkey, he said they should just forget them and concentrate on developing ties with Iran (he said the name specifically) and other regional and eastern countries.

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  Quote Lmprs Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2006 at 13:19
No offence but I don't believe it.

No way that a Turkish general would approve an alliance with a non-secular state.
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  Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2006 at 13:27

who said anything about an alliance? and I am not making it up .

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  Quote Mortaza Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2006 at 13:34

Originally posted by barish

No offence but I don't believe it.

No way that a Turkish general would approve an alliance with a non-secular state.

 

So they are nothing more than morons, Regime of iran is not our issue. If we have same interest we can become ally with even satan itself.

If we allied with greece after one of most bloody war, we can also become ally with iran.

Infact without alliance of iran, we have no alternatives but become a toy of USA at middle east.

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  Quote Mortaza Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2006 at 13:36

By the way, Infact It is iran who refuse cooperation with Turkey until now.

Now everything is different, because they know we dont want USA attact to iran. Infact we are against that war more than other countries.

 

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  Quote Lmprs Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Mar-2006 at 13:38
Originally posted by Zagros

who said anything about an alliance? and I am not making it up .

Sure you don't, but I think you are misinformed.
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