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The Battle of Naissus

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Imperator Invictus View Drop Down
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  Quote Imperator Invictus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: The Battle of Naissus
    Posted: 20-Aug-2005 at 22:19
Great battle summary! The crisis of the third century was surely one of the most exciting times of the empire.

Here's a great map of the period, showing the battle locations of Naissus and others.

http://www.utexas.edu/courses/romanciv/end%20and%20legacy/in vasions.jpg
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  Quote Heraclius Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Aug-2005 at 08:28

 Thanks. 

 Wow excellent map  it really shows the extent of the mayhem the empire was in at this point.

 The crisis of the 3rd century is definately one of the most exciting periods of Roman history, its amazing it survived at all.

 Aurelian though was a special Emperor in only 5 years he achieved all of the things I listed which is remarkable, yet he's largely ignored or overlooked which is a shame.

A tomb now suffices him for whom the world was not enough.
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  Quote Ahmed The Fighter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-Aug-2005 at 03:33
Intrested battle,Hard victory is greater than easy victory.
"May the eyes of cowards never sleep"
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  Quote Byzantine Emperor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-Aug-2005 at 12:55

Nice expose there on the battle!  I think Gallienus is too often ignored in many assessments of the barracks emperors.  Granted the barracks period in general was very deleterious for the Empire, but Gallienus seemed like a man of action at a time when serious action was needed.  He had to face all of those rebellions in Gaul--this was an unprecedented threat to the Roman imperial tradition.  From some accounts, we understand that he was also an amateur poet of some repute. 

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  Quote Heraclius Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29-Aug-2005 at 12:56

 Gallienus is abit overlooked to be honest, I suppose its because he was followed by some brilliant soldier Emperors like Claudius II Gothicus who infact smashed the Alemanni who may have numbered 100,000 men also at "the battle of lake Benacus" only a few months after Naissus and went a long way to bringing the Gallic empire back into the empire.

 Also then followed by the ever impressive Aurelian, who overshadowed them both.

A tomb now suffices him for whom the world was not enough.
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  Quote opuslola Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07-Oct-2009 at 12:53
According to the map provided by Imperator Invictus, one can see that a sea asault appears to have been successful by the Goths (Germans? or Vikings?) and the "Heruli!" (Herr-rulers? / lords?)

According to the map, it seems Athens itself was taken in 268 CE! Is this a fact?

Isn't it strange that the Roman "Decius" seems to have lost "Dacia?" Or maybe it should have been "Decia?", or "Decius", "Dacius?"

But, just how did the Goths and Heruli sail all the way to Athens to ultimately "sack it?" Were they just natural sailors? Note the above map also shows them sacking Trabzon!

Wow, they were made for sea assaults, were they not?

Oh! It seems that they also sacked Byzantium!" See;

http://www.fact-archive.com/encyclopedia/Heruli

Thus they seemed to be able to attack three of the greatest cities of the Greeks, via sea invasion, in a period of but a few years! Thus, they are amongst the most successful invaders in history!

My opinion: mostly myth!

Your thoughts?

Edited by opuslola - 07-Oct-2009 at 13:00
http://www.quotationspage.com/subjects/history/
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  Quote p,c,ma Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-Sep-2010 at 16:52
Athens was left unprotected by the Romans (who at this point only cared for protecting themselves), and merely left Dacia after the emperor's death.
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  Quote Hachimantaro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Oct-2010 at 19:40
Originally posted by Byzantine Emperor

Nice expose there on the battle!  I think Gallienus is too often ignored in many assessments of the barracks emperors.  Granted the barracks period in general was very deleterious for the Empire, but Gallienus seemed like a man of action at a time when serious action was needed.  He had to face all of those rebellions in Gaul--this was an unprecedented threat to the Roman imperial tradition.  From some accounts, we understand that he was also an amateur poet of some repute. 

Gallienus is very overlooked for me. infact he stood against the senate which was corrpt at the time, which is why he was villified by them, and he fought many hard rebellions, including one by his own trusted top general. He was responsible for building the brilliant cavalry arm which both Claudius II and later Aurelian came from.
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  Quote opuslola Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Oct-2010 at 21:13
You notice that it seems we got into the above discussion somwhere in the middle of it!

Regardless, did either of you read about the battle?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Naissus

Also blow up the map attached and look at the information provided, etc.

The wiki site actually gives some good information! Please look up the information on the city also!

Consider that the word "Na-issus" seems familar! I would suggest that "Issus" and variants of it, merely means "river" and is related to the word "issue", as in "issues forth", etc.! Note, I consider "-icus / acus", and "-issos" as another versions!

There is even a similar river in Athens!

http://www.bgs.gr/main.php?l1=74&l2=109

Perhaps you can find other name related places and rivers?

You might well even consider this;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Issus

Regards,

Edited by opuslola - 17-Oct-2010 at 21:20
http://www.quotationspage.com/subjects/history/
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  Quote Hachimantaro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Oct-2010 at 22:13
Originally posted by opuslola

You notice that it seems we got into the above discussion somwhere in the middle of it!

Regardless, did either of you read about the battle?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Naissus

Also blow up the map attached and look at the information provided, etc.

The wiki site actually gives some good information! Please look up the information on the city also!

Consider that the word "Na-issus" seems familar! I would suggest that "Issus" and variants of it, merely means "river" and is related to the word "issue", as in "issues forth", etc.! Note, I consider "-icus / acus", and "-issos" as another versions!

There is even a similar river in Athens!

http://www.bgs.gr/main.php?l1=74&l2=109

Perhaps you can find other name related places and rivers?

You might well even consider this;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Issus

Regards,
 
Well im already quite amiliar with the battle, as military history is a favourite of mine, but more importantly the Roman period.
 
Claudius II was an outstanding leader who crushed all goths in his path until dying of the plague, ut we can also say it was thanks to Gallienus for creating the cavalry unit from where he served.  
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