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native American might have horses before 1492

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  Quote tommy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: native American might have horses before 1492
    Posted: 25-Aug-2016 at 22:11
I believe that some tribes would have their own horses, even before the arrival of the Spanish, although scholars dismissed this statement.
Most of the native american owned horses were different with the European  horses, in  the appearance.Native owned horses always had pinto and leopard spotting pattern, which could not be found from the Spanish  horses, that were always in plain colors.

So if the tradition theory  were  really right, Native captured and acquired horses from Spanish and other Europeans, then native owned horses would also be the plain colors, there would be no  pinto and leopard spotting pattern.

I believe native owned horses would be the direct offspring of those prehistoric horses, which were spotted, Europe prehistoric horses were also in the same appearance, as seen in the cave painting.but these primitive horses extincted or evolved into the plain colour, as in America, the original home of horses, they had not evolved , preserving the prehistoric appearance.
But the native legends were right, some tribes( in the great plain) had their own horses, before 1492.
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  Quote Sander Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28-Aug-2016 at 09:11
The pre-columbian horse is well attested. There are multiple carbon-dated remains from multiple archaeological sites providing precolumbian dates ( incl. some centuries before 1492),  see the impressive table (page 8) in this paper:

Craig C. Downer. The Horse and Burro as Positively Contributing Returned Natives in North America. American Journal of Life Sciences. Vol. 2, No. 1, 2014, pp. 5-23. doi: 10.11648/j.ajls.20140201.12


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Edited by Sander - 28-Aug-2016 at 09:32
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  Quote rakovsky Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29-Aug-2016 at 12:40
But they comonly think the native horses were kind of like Zebras in their build (so kind of hard to ride) and died out thousands of years before Europeans' arrival, kind of like the wooly mammoth.
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  Quote Windemere Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29-Aug-2016 at 19:32
The prehistoric horses in North America died out many, many years before the Spanish arrived. They were an earlier species of horse than the horses that the Spanish conquistadores brought over. Many of the horses that the Spanish brought over went wild. They thrived in western North America, formed wild herds, and their population quickly increased. They increased their range, and spread out throughout the west. In  many cases, North American Indian tribes encountered these wild horse herds many, many years before encountering the Spaniard settlers and colonizers. None of the Indians had any horses prior to 1492, though. The horses actually changed the lifestyle of many western Indian tribes, and they developed the famous "horse culture" of the 1800s Plains Indians.

The Indians apparently liked bright horse colors, and they valued pintos, appaloosas, etc. They loved having horses with unusual color patterns. But they also had the more common, plainer colored horses.  The Europeans actually tended to prefer plainer colored horses (blacks, bays, chesnuts, grays), especially for military use. They wanted to have large numbers of horses well-matched in color for their cavalries. There were pinto horses in Europe, but they tended not to be valued as much there as they were by the Amerinds. The Knabstrupper spotted breed of horse developed in Europe, and the coat color is genetically the same as the Appaloosa breed which developed in the American west.

All these hoses were the same species, though with selective breeding they developed unique domestic breeds. Horse color actually depends upon genetics; similar to other domestic animal breeds.


Edited by Windemere - 29-Aug-2016 at 19:39
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  Quote tommy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30-Aug-2016 at 06:50
But if the spanish prefered plain horse for military actions, this meant that they would only bring this kind of horse to america, and Native American would only acquire and own this kind of horse, then how to explain the origin of those Native owned spotted horses?
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  Quote Windemere Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30-Aug-2016 at 09:59
Well, I imagine that most of the original horses that the Spanish explorers and settlers brought to America were solid colored (black, brown, bay, chesnut, gray, etc.). But they possibly may have had some spotted horses (pintos, appaloosas, etc.) as well. They probably had some of the more unusual colors (like palomino) as well.  But a horse's coat color depends upon what genetic characteristics (genotype) it carries. Solid horses can produce spotted foals, and vice-versa. Some colors are dominant, others are recessive. For instance, bay or chesnut are usually dominant colors, while palomino is recessive. The color of the foal will depend upon what combination of genes it inherits from its parents.
I'm not sure what genetic combination produces pinto or appaloosa-patterned horses. It might be whatever color genes the horse carries, along with white color genes.
The wild horse herds in western North America today contain horses of all different colors. I believe that most of them are the plainer, solid colors, but there are also plenty of spotted colors, and also some of the more unusual colors.


Edited by Windemere - 30-Aug-2016 at 10:03
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  Quote Centrix Vigilis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30-Aug-2016 at 17:56
''Are North America’s wild horses native? ''

http://www.horsetalk.co.nz/2014/10/07/north-americas-wild-horses-native/#axzz4Ir53K37Z
"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"

S. T. Friedman


Pilger's law: 'If it's been officially denied, then it's probably true'

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  Quote tommy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31-Aug-2016 at 06:47
Europe had spotted horses, they were taken from America, white europeans believed that spotted horses were in bad quality, or sontaining some kinds of illness, so they would not use these horses in military actions, and they would not bring the spotted horse to America as well, those spotted horses of America were orginal species of the continent
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  Quote Centrix Vigilis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01-Sep-2016 at 15:53
Interestingly 'spotted horses' were prized among some plains tribes.
"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"

S. T. Friedman


Pilger's law: 'If it's been officially denied, then it's probably true'

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  Quote tommy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02-Sep-2016 at 01:58
They believed that those spotted horses were so beautiful, but in my opinion, I also believe that plain horses would have better quality.

All  prized race horses around the world  are  plain in colour
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