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17th & 18th century small bar-lead.

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Le Loup View Drop Down
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  Quote Le Loup Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: 17th & 18th century small bar-lead.
    Posted: 30-Nov-2013 at 20:58
I am trying to research "small bar lead" use in Great Britain & the New World during the 17th & 18th century. Records show that small bar lead was traded to woodsmen & woodland Indians in this period, but I have been unable to find good images of original finds, & the sizes & weights for this small bar lead.
Can anyone recommend any links or otherwise throw any light on this subject please?
Regards, Keith.
“I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life and see if I could not learn what it had to teach” Henry David Thoreau.

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Le Loup View Drop Down
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  Quote Le Loup Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Dec-2013 at 17:44
Originally posted by

I have been meaning to write something like this on my website and you have given me an idea. Your post will be rather good.

Glad my post helped in some way. Here is hoping we both get some answers.
Here is a link to the research I have done so far, on my blog:
http://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com.au/2013/11/research-small-bar-lead-for-making-shot.html
Regards, Keith.

“I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life and see if I could not learn what it had to teach” Henry David Thoreau.

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red clay View Drop Down
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  Quote red clay Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28-Dec-2013 at 11:33
That post was from a spam bot, sorry about that.
 
Keith, I was at your site, very interesting.  I live on the Rancocas
Creek, in West central New Jersey.  The Delaware River is approx. 6-8 miles downstream.  Approx. 5-6 miles upstream are the towns of Hainsport and Lumberton, 2 important port towns of the 18th cent. 
This region is well known for it's early Iron Smelters.  Bog Iron was transported to lumberton, from there it was shipped out to Philadelphia, and trade goods shipped in.
This valley has seen European influences from the late 16th cent. on.  As a teen, I found quite a few lead bars,  I assumed they were for fishing weights, never gave a thought to lead shot. 
 
In the 50 years since, I've become much more aware of the artifacts found here and the history connected to them.  I have a small but interesting collection of musket flints, all found within 3 miles of my home.
 
A thought, due to the abundance of Iron here, is it possible it was used for shot?  I know cannon shot was produced here in considerable quantity. 
 
 
"Arguing with someone who hates you or your ideas, is like playing chess with a pigeon. No matter what move you make, your opponent will walk all over the board and scramble the pieces".
Unknown.
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Le Loup View Drop Down
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  Quote Le Loup Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28-Dec-2013 at 16:21
Hi red clay. Lead & iron pigs/ingots were often used as ships ballast, this made it less expensive to transport. Iron & lead were used to make cannon balls, but only lead was used to make small shot for flintlock small arms.
Small bar-lead was traded to Indians & colonials for making bullets. This small bar-lead may have been made at the smelters in England & Wales, but I have not been able to find any info on this. Somewhere I have no doubt there are some images of this small bar-lead, & info as to its size & weight.
You are very lucky living in an area with so much history, & I envy you your collection of gun flints. For me there is something very special in being able to touch a real artifact.
Thanks for the info on your area, much appreciated.
Keith.
“I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life and see if I could not learn what it had to teach” Henry David Thoreau.

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