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Direct Link To This Post Topic: The Christian Saint series
    Posted: 13-Mar-2013 at 14:36
In honor of Pope Francis I; newly elected today.
 
His namesake's biography.
 
St. Francis
 
 


Edited by Centrix Vigilis - 13-Mar-2013 at 14:37
"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"

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Pilger's law: 'If it's been officially denied, then it's probably true'

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12-Aug-2012 at 20:08
Faith in organized religion not necessarily being pc much these days....I remain in awe of the faithful who still exercise it. Among them.... the soldiers of Christ in Poland, Mexico, Ireland and Russia. and this takes nothing from those who fight the good fight where they do in other lands. Alas I should fight it better.Wink
 
Today Aug 12.....is remembered especially in Ireland.
 
August 12
St. Muredach, First Bishop of Killala, in Ireland
 
Not much known about Muredach....but I like the idea that 'old man' can still be counted amongst the faithful.LOL
 
 
"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"

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Pilger's law: 'If it's been officially denied, then it's probably true'

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01-Aug-2012 at 16:22
Several days ago was my birthday...so the coast is clear and no.... I seek no bullshit well wishes, feigned or other, of the day....to old fer that nonsense.....But I will tell ya that the Lady Saint Mary Magdalen and I, share a day. How old ya ask? None of yer frigging business.
Honor the Lady not me. She will always be a better example of what to be then me.
 
Tho I am not bad.....LOL 
 
 
 
And remember your Regiment.... ya heathens.


Edited by Centrix Vigilis - 01-Aug-2012 at 16:23
"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"

S. T. Friedman


Pilger's law: 'If it's been officially denied, then it's probably true'

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30-Jul-2012 at 15:21
Saint Julitta
 
“May my estates perish, or be disposed of to strangers; may I also lose my life, and may this my body be cut in pieces, rather than that by the least impious word I should offend God who made me. If you take from me a little portion of this earth, I shall gain heaven for it.”
 
 
 
My mother's favorite and she had a very good reason. Not just because she was a Catholic. Ya see... I lost her to breast cancer when I was nine years old. And that was as a serious loss as I have ever suffered....but she always smiled and had a kind word, even we she fell sick. And she always encouraged me to read. Because of her I learned how to love history and soldiering and the love of training and leading them.
 
The quote attributed to Julitta may or may not be true but my Mother epitomized it for me.
 
I otoh am not nearly as pious as my Mother.....so and as we still say in the Regiment....'That's gawdamn good enough for any trooper'.
 
 
 
But I remain satisfied she will continue to 'cover' for me.
 
Love ya Ma.
 
 
 
 
 
 
"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"

S. T. Friedman


Pilger's law: 'If it's been officially denied, then it's probably true'

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15-Jul-2012 at 12:47
Today is my Uncle's birthday. He is 81. He's an old shell back; a destroyer man of 12 years to include the Korean Conflict. For those of you who don't know destroyer men and their ships are the Cavalrymen of the Sea. Once upon a time he was as hard a drinking and cussing sailor man to ever hit a port. But that's not the point. His middle name is Phillip. His mother gave him that name in honor of the Apostle/Saint. That man...Saint Phillip was simply told to 'follow me'...and he did. No fuss.. no shouting.. no worries about car payments, house loan or a shitty economy. And an even shittier world to worry about. He listened and he followed.
That's faith. 
Happy B-day to my Uncle Hank.
 
 
Saint Phillip
 
"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"

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Pilger's law: 'If it's been officially denied, then it's probably true'

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Jun-2012 at 09:39
St. Canutus, King of Denmark, Martyr
 
"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"

S. T. Friedman


Pilger's law: 'If it's been officially denied, then it's probably true'

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Jun-2012 at 00:47
Always burdened with the appellation of ' doubter '....but even every good Cavalryman always doubts... even when only a tiny bit..ask those of Murat's who charged at Eylau....
Then like Thomas... draws forth saber and charges. Certain of... if not his cause.... his gawdamn glory.
 
Thomas earned his. The same way.
 
 
St Thomas the Apostle
 
 
 
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-May-2012 at 18:22
Saint Barbara
Patron of Artillerymen...missile men and rocket men. Beloved of Firefighters.
 
 
Whether she was legend or not and or abandoned by the Church..she has never been lost nor forgotten by the former.
 
 
 
 
"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"

S. T. Friedman


Pilger's law: 'If it's been officially denied, then it's probably true'

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-May-2012 at 19:12
"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"

S. T. Friedman


Pilger's law: 'If it's been officially denied, then it's probably true'

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-May-2012 at 23:30
May 14th - in the Orthodox calendar the feast of St. Isidor of Chios - /the guy in the left of the icon/
Icon of the saint of the day.

"...The Holy Martyr Isidor lived during the III Century on the Island of Chios, and was a native of Alexandria. During the first year of rule of the emperor Decius (249-251) there was issued an edict to make a census of all those capable to serve in the armies of the Roman empire. Saint Isidor, tall and strong of body, was drafted into the regiment of the military-commander Numerius. Saint Isidor was a Christian, he led a life of temperance and abstinence, he was chaste and he shunned all the pagan customs. Another imperial edict then commanded, that all the soldiers were to worship the Roman pagan gods and to offer them sacrifice. Not to obey the edict carried the penalty of torture and death. The centurion reported to the military-commander Numerius, that Isidor was a Christian. At the interrogation before Numerius Saint Isidor without flinching confessed his faith in Christ the Saviour and refused to offer sacrifice to idols. Numerius urged the saint not to expose himself to tortures and to obey the will of the emperor, but Saint Isidor answered, that he would obey only the will of the eternal God, Christ the Saviour, and never would he renounce Him. The saint was handed over to torture. During the time of torments he praised Christ God and denounced the pagan idols. The military-commander gave orders to cut out the tongue of the saint, but even after this the saint continued distinctly to give glory to Christ. Numerius in fright fell to the ground and himself lost the gift of speech. Getting up with the help of soldiers, by means of gestures he demanded a small board and on it wrote an order -- to cut off the head of Saint Isidor. Saint Isidor welcomed his death sentence with joy and said: "I glorify Thee, O my Master, that by Thy mercy Thou hast accepted me in Thine Heavenly Habitation!" The death of the martyr occurred in the year 251. After execution his body was cast out without burial, but another saint, the secret Christian Ammonios, took up his body and committed it to earth. Later on Ammonios himself accepted a martyr's death in the city of Kyzikos (Comm. 4 September).

At the beginning of the XII Century the Russian pilgrim Daniel saw the relics of the holy Martyr Isidor on the Island of Chios. His relics were later transferred to Constantinople and placed in the church of Saint Irene...." http://www.stlukeorthodox.com/html/saints/may/14th.cfm

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-May-2012 at 22:49
For my friends in the Emerald Isle.Big smile
Note the reference to Saint Basel.
St. Comgall, Abbot in Ireland
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07-May-2012 at 19:41
May 7th, in the Orthodox calendar - the feast of St. Acacius of Byzantium, also known as Acato of Avila, Achatius of Byzantium, Agathius of Byzantium, Agathus of Byzantium, Agazio (in Calabria), and Cuenca (in Spain). Known as a patron of soldiers and specifically those fighting agaisnt the Ottomans in the conquered Balkans.
[Saint Acacius of Byzantium]

















"...Saint Agathius (died 303), also known as Achatius or Agathonas[1] or Acacius of Byzantium,[4] was a Cappadocian Greek centurion of the imperial army. He was arrested for his faith on charges for being a Christian by Tribune Firmus in Perinthus, Thrace, tortured, and then brought to Byzantium (Constantinople), where he was scourged and beheaded, being made a martyr because he would not give up his Christian Faith. In the later centuries he became popular among the Greeks of the Mani Peninsula in Greece, especially during the reign of the Ottoman Empire in which the Ottomans attempted to forcibly convert everyone to Islam, although the Maniots refused....Constantine the Great built a church in his honour. His relics were translated ca. 630 to a spring at Squillace, close by the Vivarium, the monastery founded in the previous century by Cassiodorus in the heel of Italy.[5] He was known in Squillace as San Agario. A relic of his arm was brought to Guardavalle in 1584 by the bishop of Squillace, Marcello Sirleto, hence Agathius' patronage of this city. Relics from Squillace were also brought to Cuenca and Ávila in Spain, where he is known as San Acato.[6]

He is also venerated in Slovenia, where numerous churches and chapels are dedicated to him; this popular veneration goes back to the 16th century, when he was considered the patron saint of the fighters against the Ottoman Turks.[7]

St. Achatius is one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers or Auxiliary Saints...." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acacius_of_Byzantium

"The Martyrdom of St. Agathius" 16 cent, by an anonymous author

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/03/Agathius-Acacius-Acacio-martyrdom.jpg/250px-Agathius-Acacius-Acacio-martyrdom.jpg



Edited by Don Quixote - 07-May-2012 at 19:50
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07-May-2012 at 02:08
Thank you, CentrixSmile
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06-May-2012 at 22:33
Originally posted by Don Quixote

I wouldn't doubt, now is so fashionable to see homosexuality in everything, with no evidence whatsoever, and with ignoring the historical and cultural realities of the times the said people lived in. In the same style of using modern standards glued to different times Marlow, Michelangelo, and others had been dubbed gay, on concocted fantasies. I would like people to start taking responsibility for their sexual preferences, instead of trying to excuse themselves with pasting the same to others. But this is another topic.

The big question about St. Sergius and Bacchus is if they really existed, not if they were gay.
 
 
Spoken like a warrior whose patroness was one as well....no wonder Artemis likes you. Even and or equally important is your realization that centuries later.... the revisionist of any ilk, especially the secularist version, will strike when they view the sheeple are at their intellectual weakest.
"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"

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Pilger's law: 'If it's been officially denied, then it's probably true'

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06-May-2012 at 17:47
Saint Veronica Giuliani

She was born Ursula Giuliani at Mercatello, Italy, in 1660. When 18 months old, she spoke her first words to a shop keeper who was serving a false measure of oil, saying: "Do justice, God sees you." At the age of 3 she began to have divine communications, and showed great care to the poor, sharing her meals and clothes with them. She confessed herself that she would be quite irritable at people who didn't agree with her on her religious outlook, and would stamp her feet at the least provocation.
Ursula wanted to dedicate her life to Jesus, but her father wanted her to marry. She contracted a mysterious disease, and was only restored to health when he relented and gave his consent to her becoming a nun.
She joined the Poor Clares in Umbria, Italy, in 1677 and took the name Veronica. Reportedly, at her reception the bishop told the abbess: "I commend this new daughter to your special care, for she will one day be a great saint."
She worked in the kitchen, infirmary and sacristy, but despite a wish to be absolutely submissive to the will of her abbess and Saviour, she experienced many temptations to return to the outside world. In1678 she had a vision of the crucified Christ, and, in mystical union with him, ever after suffered acute physical pain in her heart.
In 1682 she became Mistress of the novices, and while she guided them with great prudence, she would never allow them to read mystical books.
In 1693 she had a vision of a chalice, symbolising the Divine Passion which was to be re-enacted within her. Only with great personal effort did she submit to it, and the following year the marks of the Crown of Thorns appeared on her head. On Good Friday 1697, the impression of Jesus' five wounds appeared on her hands, feet and side, and only on the order of the bishop would she submit to a medical examination. She prayed that God would make the stigmata invisible, so she would not have to be examined, but this miracle failed to occur.She also had a deformity on one of her fingers - a mark around her finger like a ring, with a pea sized pimple where a stone would be. Veronica claimed that this was a ring Christ had given her as a sign of their divine marriage.
She also went through times of lengthy fasting in response to divine visions. On one of these fasts she was spotted taking food from the kitchen. In response, her supporters claimed that the devil had taken on her form and it was he who had been seen, not the real Veronica.
In 1716, she was elected abbess. She died of a stroke caused by a brain hemorrhage on July 9, 1727.



After Veronica's death a figure of the Cross, the Crown of Thorns and a chalice were supposedly found impressed upon her heart. Her body is said to remain uncorrupted in a glass coffin, but the present body on display in the monastery of St.Veronica Giuliani in Città di Castello, Italy, is a wax image.



She was canonized by Pope Gregory XVI on May 26 1839.

http://www.santaveronicagiuliani.org/eng/index.html
http://breathingwithbothlungs.blogspot.co.uk/2009/07/veronica-giuliani-woman-on-fire-for.html

Edited by Sidney - 06-May-2012 at 17:48
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06-May-2012 at 17:29
I wouldn't doubt, now is so fashionable to see homosexuality in everything, with no evidence whatsoever, and with ignoring the historical and cultural realities of the times the said people lived in. In the same style of using modern standards glued to different times Marlow, Michelangelo, and others had been dubbed gay, on concocted fantasies. I would like people to start taking responsibility for their sexual preferences, instead of trying to excuse themselves with pasting the same to others. But this is another topic.

The big question about St. Sergius and Bacchus is if they really existed, not if they were gay.


Edited by Don Quixote - 06-May-2012 at 17:29
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06-May-2012 at 17:13
Originally posted by Centrix Vigilis



If by way of origination in the ancient Catholic church...yes. If by way of the Orthodox and or Protestantism yes and no. That all depends on their respective schisms and seperations and the conventions preceding and subsequently followed in the determination of an individual's status in becoming or that which was required to become a saint. Much as their doctrinal dogma difference was developed.

So a saints personal religious history means nothing to the person venerating him/her. For the same saint, to a Catholic she is a Catholic, to a Protestant she is a Protestant, to an Easternn-Orthodox she is an Eastern-Orthodox. Absurd. But nothing new. Groups appropriate individuals to themselves, without any real concern about the individual's personal history or beliefs. Saints Sergius and Bacchus have recently been appropriated as two homosexual saints.


Edited by Sidney - 06-May-2012 at 17:15
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06-May-2012 at 16:47
May 6th - St. Sergius and Bacchus - military martyrs:
"...Martyrs, d. in the Diocletian persecution in Coele-Syria about 303. Their martyrdom is well authenticated by the earliest martyrologies and by the early veneration paid them, as well as by such historians as Theodoret. They were officers of troops on the frontier, Sergius being primicerius, and Bacchus secundarius. According to the legend, there were high in esteem of the Caesar Maximianus on account of their bravery, but this favour was turned into hate when they acknowledged their Christian faith. When examined under torture they were beaten so severely with thongs that Bacchus died under the blows. Sergius, though, had much more suffering to endure; among other tortures, as the legend relates, he had to run eighteen miles in shoes which were covered on the soles with sharp-pointed nails that pierced through the foot. He was finally beheaded. The burial-place of Sergius and Bacchus was pointed out in the city of Resaph; in honour of Sergius the Emperor Justinian also built churches in honour of Sergius at Constantinople and Acre; the one at Constantinople, now a mosque, is a great work of Byzantine art. In the East, Sergius and Bacchus were universally honoured. Since the seventh century they have a celebrated church in Rome. Christian art represents the two saints as soldiers in military garb with branches of palm in their hands. Their feast is observed on 7 October. The Church calendar gives the two saints Marcellus and Apuleius on the same day as Sergius and Bacchus. They are said to have been converted to Christianity by the miracles of St. Peter. According to the "Martyrologium Romanum" they suffered martyrdom soon after the deaths of Sts. Peter and Paul and were buried near Rome. Their existing Acts are not genuine and agree to a great extent with those of Sts. Nereus and Achilleus. The veneration of the two saints is very old. A mass is assigned to them in the "Sacramentarium" of Pope Gelasius...." http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13728a.htm

File:SerBac.jpg

The are also commemorated in the Armenian church:
"...In the Armenian Church traditions Sergius, or Sarkis, was venerated as a Christian general in the Roman army. He was martyred with his son, Martyros, for witnessing to their faith in Christ. The feast is preceded by a three-day fasting. Sergius and Bacchus are a classic example of paired saints; scholar John Boswell considers them to be the most influential set of such an archetype, more so than even Saints Peter and Paul.[4][5]..."http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Bacchus

There is a good long article on the development of their image here http://www.ucc.ie/milmart/sergorig.html



Edited by Don Quixote - 06-May-2012 at 16:47
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06-May-2012 at 16:33
Originally posted by Sidney


Aren't all saints Catholic?

Some saints that were saintified before the separation of the Orthodox and Catholic churches are shared by both, but some are local; like most Irish saints are strictly Catholic - they have no feasts in the Orthodox calendar. In the case I specified because the said saint/s was/were strictly Catholic.


Edited by Don Quixote - 06-May-2012 at 16:33
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06-May-2012 at 16:13
The Passion of St. Christopher (BHL 1764)
Interesting because he was not martyred alone...rather... two prostitutes who were sent to tempt him.... upon seeing and speaking with him..... were caused to repent and then also were martyred before him. As he was forced to watch their torture he, it is indicated, was further strengthened by their courage.
 
 
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