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Renaissance Art Likes

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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Renaissance Art Likes
    Posted: 01-Jul-2011 at 19:10
This is an easy one I hope. What are your Renaissance Art likes? This isn't restricted to painting, so be free to post any examples from the era.
What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.
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  Quote Centrix Vigilis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01-Jul-2011 at 19:31
Lord Michel Eyquem de Montaigne
Essays
"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"

S. T. Friedman


Pilger's law: 'If it's been officially denied, then it's probably true'

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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18-Aug-2011 at 12:54
The Ambassadors (1533) is a painting by Hans Holbein the Younger. Much of what the Renaissance is about is found on this painting.




Edited by TheAlaniDragonRising - 18-Aug-2011 at 12:56
What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Aug-2011 at 21:21
This is something I just found - "Allegory of the Human Life", Alessandro Alori. I like the symbolism /or at least what I think it presents/, of the humanity doing what everyone tries to get done, and the angel trumpets that we are living on a borrowed time.



Edited by Don Quixote - 21-Aug-2011 at 21:24
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Aug-2011 at 01:50
I wanted to post something more cheerful, so I don't have nightmares tonight -  "Danae" by Correggio.
Click!










Edited by Don Quixote - 23-Aug-2011 at 20:11
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  Quote Centrix Vigilis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Aug-2011 at 07:23
"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"

S. T. Friedman


Pilger's law: 'If it's been officially denied, then it's probably true'

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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Aug-2011 at 08:07
The Creation of Adam, on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, and painted by Michelangelo. On describing the fresco it has been described as thus, “Despite the height of the ceiling the proportions of the Creation of Adam are such that when standing beneath it, “it appears as if the viewer could simply raise a finger and meet those of God and Adam”.

 



 


Edited by TheAlaniDragonRising - 23-Aug-2011 at 08:16
What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Aug-2011 at 16:30
Madonna Surrounded by Seraphim and Cherubim, 1452,Jean Fouquet. I love the way that Mary in this painting has been made into this high class Renaissance figure in the way she is portrayed.





Edited by TheAlaniDragonRising - 24-Aug-2011 at 16:31
What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.
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  Quote Centrix Vigilis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Aug-2011 at 16:52
"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"

S. T. Friedman


Pilger's law: 'If it's been officially denied, then it's probably true'

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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Aug-2011 at 19:09
Originally posted by Centrix Vigilis

Hieronymus Bosch

This is an interesting and useful link, thanks, CV!

A portrait of Anne Boleyn, Henry VIII's unfortunate second wife and mother of Queen Elizabeth I:

Anne Boleyn as the Queen of Spades:




Edited by Don Quixote - 24-Aug-2011 at 19:12
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Aug-2011 at 19:46
Anne Boleyn:

Queen Elizabeth I
http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/lizvandermeulen.jpg
I think there is much similarity in the shape of the face and nose, but Elizabeth doesn't have the playfulness in the eyes like her mom - and with a reason, I think. After what happened to her mom, and all the pain Elizabeth went through as a child because of it, it's no wonder that she never married; I wouldn't too. Elizabeth eyes are serious, almost frozen, under control, nothing like the charming drawing-in eyes of Anne.
http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/elizaphoenix.jpg

http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/elizahilliard.jpg

http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/elizanglesey.jpg
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  Quote Ollios Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25-Aug-2011 at 07:34
Renaissance artists in Ottoman Empire;

First portrait painting in Ottomans. It was made in 1480 by Gentile Bellini
   

Leonardo Va Vinci's bridge project for Istanbul


maybe it isn't renaissance period bridge, but its plan is. Big smile






Ellerin Kabe'si var,
Benim Kabem İnsandır
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25-Aug-2011 at 19:30
Polidoro da Caravaggio "Noli me Tangere", 1625:

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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Aug-2011 at 03:17
Ceccino de Salvati 'Lamentation" 1539-41
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Aug-2011 at 03:21
Giorgione, "Sleeping Venus", 1510

For some strange reason I get the picture or too big, so it doesn't fit, or too small, so it can barely be seen, so I'm going to paste here the link, for whoever what to see the whole thing http://www.wga.hu/index1.html   it's under "G", the 3rd page for "Giorgione", under "various Paintings" the bottom of the page.


Edited by Don Quixote - 26-Aug-2011 at 03:29
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Aug-2011 at 14:59
Baciccio, "The Pieta", 1667

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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-Aug-2011 at 19:33
In some way this Saint Rosa, by Melchiore Caffa, 1665,

 as another type of Venus, a spiritual one, since a Christian saint is one who replaced the earthly ecstacy with an otherworldy one; but the spiritual  one is usually presented in the same way as the earthly one - I suppose because there is no other way to present in physical what one knows in physical terms only. Freud would have a ball with this.
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  Quote Karalem Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28-Aug-2011 at 12:24
It is intersesting to compare Renaissance art with the mostly ecclesiastical and artistically sketchy art from the early and mid middle ages. Strict religious pattern of medieval art vs flamboyant, perfect, unrestrained painting of the Renaissance. On Wikipedia, in History of Painting both periods can be compared. What caused such an evoltion in painting through the Renaissance?
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28-Aug-2011 at 16:54
Hunt in the forest, by Paolo Uccello1460s. This painting is meant to be about courtly love.




Edited by TheAlaniDragonRising - 28-Aug-2011 at 16:58
What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29-Aug-2011 at 02:58
Originally posted by Karalem

It is intersesting to compare Renaissance art with the mostly ecclesiastical and artistically sketchy art from the early and mid middle ages. Strict religious pattern of medieval art vs flamboyant, perfect, unrestrained painting of the Renaissance. On Wikipedia, in History of Painting both periods can be compared. What caused such an evoltion in painting through the Renaissance?

The Renaissance art was built in the base of the Gothic art; this was the time when art started to be seen as educational medium, since most people were illiterate. I suppose this brought the popularity of art to start with. Then with the interest toward the classical art and studying the Roman/Greek sculptures the idea of prespective was developed, I'm not sure from where because the Greek and Roman pictorial art didn't use perspective; besides I'm not sure how many such pictorial models were available at the time. Brunelleschi was experimenting with perspective, Donatello was using it in this relief:
Relief of St. George and Dragon DONATELLO: Relief: St. George and the Dragon

Masaccio used perspective too, in pictorial presentations, this is his "Tribute Money":
Tribute Money
I suppose the combination of the roundness of the classical sculpture with the perspective did the trick - many of Michelangelo's paintings are imitations of sculpture, one can almost see them as sculptures, like in his "Leda and the Swan":



Then the inspiration they were drawing from religion plus the inspiration drawn  from the classical mythology combined and gave rise to hundreds combinations of different aspects of those. The still life appeared, and became very popular in Flanders; I consider this to be a really unique European development, since I don't remember seeing it neither in the classical art, nor in the Arabic one, nor in the Byzantinian one, so it has to be a local development. The Italian painters seen to have been interested more in religious or mythological themes, while in Flanders and the Netherlands a real interest toward the life or ordinary people was developed, and in the simple things of life - an apple, a goose, a vase - very non-pretentious, and still investigated and presented in a most delightful way:
Nicholas Maes, 'Old Woman Dosing", 1656:
Abraham van Beyeren's "Still life with Lobster", 1653
So, it was the combination of old inspirations from the classics, the invention of the perspective, and using loads of imagination in all possible directions, enjoying every part and side of life and loving it in colors - this is my take on the roots of the Renaissance anyway.


Edited by Don Quixote - 29-Aug-2011 at 02:59
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