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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Archaeology news updates
    Posted: 11-Mar-2016 at 10:47

Significant Civil War-Era Shipwreck Discovered Off N.C. Coast

Kure Beach

Another pearl in the form of a large iron-hulled Civil War era steamer has been discovered in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of N.C., near Oak Island. Researchers and archaeologists from the Underwater Archaeology Branch of the North Carolina Office of State Archaeology and the Institute of International Maritime Research made the discovery Saturday, Feb. 27 during sonar operations.

The vessel is believed to possibly be the remains of one of three blockade runners used to penetrate the wall of Union naval vessels blocking the port of Wilmington during the Civil War. The goal of the Union blockade was to keep supplies from reaching the Confederacy through one of its most important ports and to prevent the export of cotton and other marketable items by the Southerners. The wreck is located 27 miles downstream from Wilmington near Fort Caswell at the mouth of the Cape Fear River, and is the first Civil War-era vessel discovered in the area in decades.

"A new runner is a really big deal," said Billy Ray Morris, Deputy State Archaeologist-Underwater and Director of the Underwater Archaeology Branch. "The state of preservation on this wreck is among the best we've ever had."

Researchers will continue working to positively identify the vessel. Three blockade runners are known to have been lost in the area, the Agnes E. FrySpunkie and Georgianna McCaw. These operations are part of a major project funded by the National Park Service through the American Battlefield Protection Program.

Historical, cartographic and archaeological resources have been examined for the past two years to better understand the maritime components of the Fort Fisher campaign. Fortifications protected both entrances to the Cape Fear River from the Atlantic and were critical in keeping open a lifeline to the Confederacy until Fort Fisher fell in January 1865.

Researchers aboard the Research Vessel Atlantic Surveyor recorded the complete hull of the vessel. Students from the East Carolina University Maritime Studies Program will join the team as they continue gathering data on the new site as the weather permits.

The Underwater Archaeology Branch within the Office of State Archaeology is part of the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

http://www.ncdcr.gov/press-release/significant-civil-war-era-shipwreck-discovered-nc-coast




Edited by TheAlaniDragonRising - 11-Mar-2016 at 10:57
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  Quote red clay Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06-Feb-2016 at 10:18
Paleoarchaic, those are the folks I search for here. It's interesting that they are using the same strategies I use for locating possible sites.
I'm using Google earth, I'm sure they use more sophisticated tech.

The earliest documented site here was dated at about 10,000 ybp. I'm fairly sure presence here goes back farther.

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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05-Feb-2016 at 13:20

Nearly 20 Stone-Tool Sites, Dating Back Up To 12,000 Years, Discovered In Nevada


This Clovis point made from chert was found in Nevada’s Dry Lake Valley, along the shores of an Ice Age lake.

Along lakes and streams that have long since disappeared, archaeologists working in southernNevada have found nearly 20 sites used by ancient hunter-gatherers as much as 12,000 years ago.

And even though the sites are remote, they weren’t discovered by accident. Scientists expected to find them there.

About 160 kilometers [100 miles] northeast of Las Vegas, researchers from the Utah-based firmLogan Simpson discovered 19 separate sites containing a variety of stone points, biface blades, and other artifacts associated with the Paleoarchaic Period, an era ranging from 7,000 to 12,000 years ago.

Though scant and widely scattered, these pieces may help clarify the hazy history of human activity throughout the Great Basin, when the Ice Age gave way to a warmer and more stable climate.

To archaeologists like Jesse Adams, who led the new study, this period marked the transition from the Pleistocene epoch to the Holocene, a time of change that has been scarcely studied in the American West.

“The Pleistocene-Holocene Transition period is a little known but fascinating time period,” said Adams, a senior archaeologist with Logan Simpson, “especially to everyone in our office, as we have identified similarly aged sites during other projects in the Great Basin which piqued our interest.”

Adams and his team found these rare sites using a technique known as predictive modeling: By identifying the qualities that previously known locations had in common, the archaeologists predicted where other, similar sites might be waiting to be found.

Previous research in the Great Basin had shown that signs of human activity from the late Pleistocene were most often found around certain kinds of land formations near water and marshlands — on the shores of lakes that have since dried up, for example, or on the landforms that overlooked them, or along the channels that led into or flowed out of them.

With funding from the Bureau of Land Management’s Lincoln County Archaeological Initiative, Adams and his colleagues used this kind of information to predict where signs Pleistocene-Holocene activity might be found in Nevada’s Lincoln County, using geographic information system (GIS) technology.

“The Lincoln County Archaeological Initiative offered an opportunity to create, and refine, a technique using GIS that would more effectively identify where these rare site types are located on the landscape,” Adams said.

Their model focused on the fact that the Great Basin’s climate was cooler and wetter at the end of the Pleistocene than it is today, with marshes and lakes that likely drew hunter-gatherers over the centuries.

After mapping the land with GIS, aerial photos, and other tools, the researchers pinpointed and then ranked the most promising locations in the study area.

“These areas were then ground-truthed and resulted in several landforms of interest,” Adams said.


By surveying the top-ranked areas on foot, archaeologists turned up seven sites in Lincoln County’s Delamar Valley, along the traces of what had been an ancient stream channel.

The sites included scatterings of fluted and stemmed projectile points fashioned in styles — such asClovis, Lake Mojave and Silver Lake — that are known to date to the Paleoarchaic epoch in the Great Basin, Adams said.

Likewise, at the nearby Dry Lake Valley, the team detected six more sites, along the shoreline of the extinct lake that gave the valley its name.

There, researchers found more stone points from the Paleoarchaic, but also many others dating from more recent periods, indicating that these lakeside sites were used many times over the millennia.

And finally, in the area of Lincoln County known as Kane Springs, yet another half-dozen sites were detected, with projectile points and flakes with an equally ancient profile.

Together, the newly found sites are providing the best view yet of the distant past in this corner of the Great Basin, Adams said.

And they also prove that GIS-based predictive modeling can work, he added, providing a potentially invaluable tool in the search for as-yet-undiscovered prehistoric sites, even in the increasingly developed American West.

“The Pleistocene-Holocene Transition is a fascinating, yet underrepresented, time period in the Great Basin,” Adams said.

“Through the creation, and later revision, of a model using GIS technology, we are able to successfully identify archaeological sites from this time period on the landscape.”

http://westerndigs.org/nearly-20-stone-tool-sites-up-to-12000-years-old-discovered-in-nevada/



Edited by TheAlaniDragonRising - 05-Feb-2016 at 13:26
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  Quote red clay Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05-Feb-2016 at 12:42
Originally posted by TheAlaniDragonRising

Originally posted by DanyelleRobinson

I also published a few stories on the Ancient One's remains, known as the Kennewick Man even though he wasn't found in Kennewick nor was the medical examiner from there, just one of those things that stuck.
No need to be coy, DanyelleRobinson, if the remains of Kennewick Man weren't found on a bank of the Columbia river in Kennewick, Washington, on July 28th 1996, then where were they found?



Just another conspiracy obsessed person. Trying to create a mystery when there isn't any.

BTW- To my knowledge, after all the fuss and legal ruckus, Kennewick man's bones are still sitting in a lab, they have yet to be reburied.
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05-Feb-2016 at 11:14

Undersea treasure: archaeologists find submerged Qin dynasty ‘seaside palace’ of China’s first emperor

Most of the remains of the Qin dynasty palace lie submerged off the coast of China’s Liaoning province.

]Archaeologists believe they may have found a submerged seaside palace built more than 2,200 years ago by China’s first emperor, Ying Zheng, mainland media reports.

The building, thought to date back to the Qin dynasty (221-207BC), was discovered under the sea off the coast of Suizhong county, in Liaoning province, researchers from Liaoning and Beijing told the Liaoshen Evening News.

Some parts of the palace can be seen during low tide.


[QUOTE]The largest discovery was a 60-metre wide square, formed of large stones, which could be the foundations of a large platform for religious sacrifices or other important activities, the archaeologists said. They also found the remains of a stone road running through the palace.

Local fishermen said they had previously found ancient coins and ceramics on the seabed, while some of the stone walls were clearly visible at low tide.

Ying Zheng, also known as Qin Shihuang, was China’s first ruler, who united the nation by conquering all of the warring states in 221BC.

He is said to have visited the East China Sea coast three times before his death in 210BC in his futile quest for immortality.

http://www.scmp.com/news/china/society/article/1903023/undersea-treasure-archaeologists-find-submerged-qin-dynasty





Edited by TheAlaniDragonRising - 05-Feb-2016 at 11:31
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15-Dec-2015 at 05:22
What secrets has this huge hole at the University of Lincoln revealed?

Archaeolgists have discovered stone and flint tools from the people who hunted deer and foraged for berries up to 11,000 years ago at what we now know as the University of Lincoln campus.

The team from Allen Archaeology have excavated tonnes of mud from 3 metres below the ground, and sifting the earth has revealed knives probably used for hunting and cutting meat and preparing plants for eating.

Gavin Glover, project manager, said: "There's a known Mesolithic flint scatter close to this particular site from somewhere between 9,000BC and 5,000BC and we have found a continuation of that.

"The finds are stone and flint tools, which tend to be small cutting blades for domestic use including hunting, butchering animals and preparing plants.

"There's no sense of Lincoln back then but it is evidence of some of the earliest human inhabitants in the area.

"The site would have been a sandbar at the edge of the water of what would have been the forerunner of the Brayford Pool.

"This was a time before farming when people would have lived in small groups moving through the landscape hunting deer and foraging for plants and berries."

Kevin MacDonald, project manager at the University of Lincoln, said: "We know that the Brayford Pool area has a rich history so we take our responsibilities to preserving its archaeology very seriously with every major new capital project on our campus.

"These archaeological excavations have been a real talking point already for students and visitors and we look forward to receiving the final survey report from our specialists, Allen Archaeology.

"The work itself is the first major step in construction of the second phase of the Isaac Newton Building which will provide state-of-the-art new facilities for teaching and research in computer science, engineering and mathematics and physics."

Archaeologists expect to be on site until the end of next week.

Lincoln's first known settlement, dating back to first century BC, was around the Brayford Pool area.

The pool even gave Lincoln its name, a derivative of Lindon. The Lin' means pool and 'don' means at the foot of the hill.

Timber houses and pottery, and the famous Witham Field dating to 300BC, were found east of the water.

Following the Roman invasion in AD48 the pool became an important inland port but it was the Vikings in the 10th century who named it 'Breit-ford' - where the 'where the river is broad and fordable'.

http://www.lincolnshireecho.co.uk/secrets-huge-hole-University-Lincoln-revealed/story-28241984-detail/story.html




Edited by TheAlaniDragonRising - 15-Dec-2015 at 05:26
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Dec-2015 at 05:08

Roman skeletons found in Lincoln are 'most significant in years'

The discovery of 23 Roman skeletons in Lincoln is one of the most significant finds in the city in recent years, say archaeologists.

Despite being a major Roman colony, few burial sites from the era have been unearthed compared to places like York or Winchester.

Now experts say they hope to "fill a huge gap our knowledge" about people who lived there in ancient times.

The dig took place in the Newland area, ahead of the construction of flats.

A decorated comb - probably made from bone - was the only item found with the skeletons.

Much of present-day Lincoln is built over the remains of one of the most important settlements in Roman Britain.

The Newlands site is outside the old Roman wall, near Brayford Pool - a natural widening of the River Witham which was used as a port by the Romans.

Kieron Manning, the city council's planning manager, said: "The Roman cemetery along Newland has been one of the most enigmatic parts of the city's archaeology, and this excavation will allow us to understand much more about the lives of the people who lived in Lincoln more than 1,500 years ago.

"Through scientific analysis, archaeologists will be able to identify the sex, age and health of the individuals buried here, and this will give us new insights into the population of Roman Lincoln.

"The potential of this site was known from previous planning-related investigations, but the extent and preservation of these remains is remarkable, and constitutes one of the most significant finds in Lincoln of recent years."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-lincolnshire-35071632


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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Nov-2015 at 22:43

Ancient underground city in Cappadocia will 'rewrite history'



An underground city found in Turkey’s touristic Cappadocia will “rewrite the history of the city,” according to the mayor in the Central Anatolian Nevşehir province, adding they had discovered people had permanently lived in the underground city, unlike other cities which were mostly carved into rocks for temporary protection.
Hasan Ünver, the mayor of Nevşehir, where Cappadocia is located, said the new findings at the ancient underground city in the province would rewrite history. 

“When the works are finalized the history of Cappadocia will be rewritten,” said Ünver, adding the findings found during the excavations dated back as the Hittite era. 

“We have reached significant discoveries; new long tunnels and spaces where people lived all together. Places where linseed oil was produced, chapels and tunnels combining various living spaces in the underground city were found,” said Ünver.


The underground city was discovered by a Turkish Housing Development Administration (TOKİ) urban transformation project. Some 1,500 buildings located in and around the Nevşehir fortress were demolished, and the underground city was discovered when the earthmoving to construct new buildings began.
Stating that the unearthed tunnels and spaces were different than other underground cities across the world, Ünver said ancient people had lived there permanently. 

“This is a real underground city where they resided permanently and not like other underground cities where they had lived temporarily,” said Ünver. “We are definite that we will also reach very important information and discoveries regarding world history.” 

The mayor said they planned for the opening of the first part of the underground city excavations in 2017, adding the digging was conducted under the guidance of archaeologist Semih İstanbulluoğlu and the control of the Culture and Tourism Ministry. 

İstanbulluoğlu said they predicted the history of the underground city to date back to even before the Hittites, adding this information would be confirmed after the finalization of the excavation’s laboratory work. 

He added they had found tobacco pipe-like objects made from meerschaum, adding they could not yet date them with certainty. 

“These can give clear information about the history of mankind,” İstanbulluoğlu said. 

Ünver said once the news hit that an underground city was discovered in Nevşehir, many researchers from various countries had come and visited the region. 
UNESCO representative Ashish Kothari had examined the underground city in June and was informed about the current restoration work in the region, where he took photos of historical artifacts unearthed during the excavation.

The area around the underground city in Nevşehir is best known world-wide for its “Fairy Chimney” rock formations, which are already on the UNESCO world heritage list.

Özcan Çakır, an associate professor at the geophysics engineering department of the 18 March University and involved in the excavations of the underground city, had said during the initials finding of the city in late 2014 they believed the tunnels were used to carry agricultural products.

“We believe that people, who were engaged in agriculture, were using the tunnels to carry agricultural products to the city. We also estimate that one of the tunnels passes under Nevşehir and reaches a faraway water source,” said Çakır.


Edited by TheAlaniDragonRising - 26-Nov-2015 at 22:48
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Oct-2015 at 23:40
Originally posted by DanyelleRobinson

I also published a few stories on the Ancient One's remains, known as the Kennewick Man even though he wasn't found in Kennewick nor was the medical examiner from there, just one of those things that stuck.
No need to be coy, DanyelleRobinson, if the remains of Kennewick Man weren't found on a bank of the Columbia river in Kennewick, Washington, on July 28th 1996, then where were they found?
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  Quote DanyelleRobinson Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Sep-2015 at 18:58
I have much respect for the contributions from the field of archeology. I also published a few stories on the Ancient One's remains, known as the Kennewick Man even though he wasn't found in Kennewick nor was the medical examiner from there, just one of those things that stuck. An archaeologists came in from France to cover it for a trade publication. He stopped in for a list of contacts and to discuss the landscape before moving on to interview sources. And we all know the contributions that archaeologists have made to aboriginal people and how far the field has come since the days preceding NAGPRA. And with the advances in technology. I saw the PBS special on the dig in the Caves of Africa and can only imagine the excitement that everyone must be feeling in anticipation of more results.
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  Quote Centrix Vigilis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Sep-2015 at 18:54
Originally posted by DanyelleRobinson

The push happening at the federal level to do this and to place the tribal monument was the sidebar.


Sidebar or other.... the monument was appropriate... and my brothers on the Anadarko would agree.
"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"

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  Quote Centrix Vigilis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Sep-2015 at 18:52
Originally posted by DanyelleRobinson

Ask. com listed this as the second web reference in my search for "Bald's eyesalve Spokane, WA." My Indian friends would be the first to say there are no coincidences.



On occasions the old things still work.

See: http://www.futurity.org/mrsa-ancient-remedy-888122/
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  Quote DanyelleRobinson Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Sep-2015 at 18:46
The push happening at the federal level to do this and to place the tribal monument was the sidebar.
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  Quote DanyelleRobinson Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Sep-2015 at 18:43
Ask. com listed this as the second web reference in my search for "Bald's eyesalve Spokane, WA." My Indian friends would be the first to say there are no coincidences.

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  Quote Centrix Vigilis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Sep-2015 at 18:34
On that note the most important point....

''The archaeologists are working to cooperate with and respect the Shoshone people in order to uncover the history of the Bear River Massacre''


See also:

http://www.ohs.org/education/oregonhistory/historical_records/dspDocument.cfm?doc_ID=5A99EACC-C709-746C-92D5469398A0502D
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  Quote DanyelleRobinson Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Sep-2015 at 18:30
My version appeared in a inner- and international weekly newspaper, Indian Country Today, on March 17, 1997. I enjoyed reading yours.
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08-Sep-2015 at 20:48

Archaeologists study largest Native American massacre site in history

When Col. Patrick Connor led a group of U.S. cavalrymen in a daytime attack on the Shoshone in Idaho, up to 493 men, women and children were killed. The events of that bitter cold January morning in 1863 are referred to as the Bear River Massacre, and although it is considered by many to be the largest Native American massacre in U.S. history, few people know the story.

The number of tribe members who died in the massacre varies in reports. Accounts at the time the number reported was 210-300 dead, while the Salt Lake Tribune reported in 2008 that a Danish emigrant claimed in his autobiography that he counted the bodies twice and numbered 493. A plaque placed by the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers at the site reports 250-300 were "killed or incapacitated."

For years, the exact location of the massacre was lost — but now, more than 150 years later, archaeologists are searching for the site, hoping to better document the event and educate the public about its significance.

“This was the largest single killing of Native Americans, but kids out here don’t know about it,” said Ken Cannon, the president of USU Archaeological Services. “Hopes are there will be better knowledge and interpretation to let people know that this very important event happened here.”

USU Archaeological Services was hired last year by the Idaho State Historical Society to do the first-ever survey of the area, which is located just north of Preston. The American Battlefield Protection Program gave a grant to Ken Reid, director of the State Historic Preservation Office in Idaho, to fund the project as part of Idaho Territory’s 150th anniversary in 2013.

The archaeologists are using a series of geophysical and excavation techniques to find the site, where they hope plaques will be erected to commemorate the historic battlefield.

Challenges and Promising Data

Fifteen decades have changed southeastern Idaho: farming, irrigation and natural processes have altered the land, even diverting the course of the Bear River and one of its tributaries, Battle Creek. Part of the archaeologists’ goal is to locate where the Bear River and Battle Creek originally flowed, then use the information to find key massacre sites, such as the Shoshone village, initial assault and fleeing of tribe members.

“One of the first things we’ve been trying to do is bring together all these various historical maps and documents to try to understand the landscape we see today,” Ken Cannon said.

In addition to historical document interpretation, the team used geophysical instruments to survey the land in search of possible historic items. Although most of what has been found so far is “farm trash,” some recent geophysical data has been promising, said Molly Cannon, who works at USU Archaeological Services.

A magnetic gradiometer, a tool that measures magnetic differences beneath the surface, revealed a heavy, black, square signature in the area.

“The size and shape of it is pretty suggestive of what a house floor might look like,” Molly Cannon said.

The archaeologists suspect the mark may indicate the location of the old Shoshone village. The village likely has the “biggest archaeological signature” of the Bear River Massacre sites, Molly Cannon said, which makes it a natural place to start the excavation.

“The area we are most interested in is trying to find out where the village was,” Ken Cannon said. “If we can identify where the village was, we can work back from that.”

Although the image suggests a house floor might be buried beneath the surface, the archaeologists can’t be certain until they excavate, she said.

“With geophysics all we’ve got are images. It just looks like shades of white and gray,” Molly Cannon said. “We can see patterns, but we won’t know what they are until we excavate them.”

Ground-penetrating radar and metal detection results also revealed the area as a point of interest, she said.

The dark print is the most “interesting” of the geophysical results, Molly Cannon said, and USU Archaeological Services plans to take a small group to the site to excavate in October.

Results of the excavation, Reid said, will be made public in November or December.

The excavation, however, will be modest, and supervised carefully by the Shoshone people.

A Watchful Shoshone Eye

Patty Timbimboo-Madsen, the cultural and natural resource manager of the Northwestern Band of the Shoshone Nation, knows the story of the Bear River Massacre from her tribe’s oral tradition, and doesn’t like the idea of archaeologists telling her the history of her people.

“To me, the work of archaeologists is still a one-sided story,” she said. “They’re telling us who and what we are, and that kind of gets a little hurtful.”

Many commemorations of the massacre by non-Shoshone people have been insensitive to Shoshone losses. For years the incident was known as the Battle of Bear River, and it wasn’t identified as a massacre until a 1993 review by the National Park Service.

“They realized it shouldn’t have happened the way it did … the killing of children, elders, women,” Timbimboo-Madsen said.

Although incident’s name has changed, evidence of the mislabeling still exists. A monument erected in 1953 says the incident was caused by “an attack by the Indians upon peaceful inhabitants” and that the Shoshone were “guilty of hostile attacks on emigrants and settlers.”

“There is a monument erected by the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers who, bless their hearts, did the best they could in the time that they put it up,” said Darren Parry, the vice chairman of the Northwestern Band of the Shoshone Nation. “It wasn’t the Battle of Bear River and it’s slanted toward the savage Indians and the brave soldiers that fought, so it doesn’t tell the whole story.”

The Shoshone are purchasing land in the area. If the location of the massacre is found, Parry hopes they can erect a monument that tells a more accurate version of the story.

Col. Patrick Connor was called upon when settlers felt they needed protection, Timbimboo-Madsen said, so he brought a group of volunteers from California to help.

“He told them, ‘I will come and protect the overland mail routes, I’ll keep my eye on the Mormons and I’ll deal with the Indians,’” she said.

During the time of the attack, the Shoshone were gathered for a ceremony to welcome in a new year and hope for an abundance of food sources, Timbimboo-Madsen said, and that’s when Connor’s army attacked with gunfire.

The Shoshone were armed and returned fire, but they seem to have run out of ammunition, Ken Cannon added. What began as a battle turned into a massacre.

“One of the tribal members foresaw the killing of our people and he kept telling the people we better go, we better go, they’re going to kill us,” Timbimboo-Madsen said. “A few other people survived, but that was it.”

The massacre was rarely talked about because it was overshadowed by events from the Civil War. Others chose not to discuss the massacre or its location because it was so devastating, she said.

“It was a place where no one really wanted to talk about because of what had happened there,” Timbimboo-Madsen said. “It was a sad, sad day, not only for the Indian people, but I think some people in the community who made friends with the Shoshone people were horrified by what had happened.”

Although sharing the story sometimes makes Timbimboo-Madsen feel sad, she believes it is important to educate others about the massacre.

“As a tribal member, you know, I go through periods of being really saddened by it,” she said, “but it’s my job as a descendant to tell their story.”

Despite any hesitance from tribe members, the tribal council voted unanimously to allow the archaeologists to excavate, provided at least one member of the tribe supervises at all times.

Out of respect for the deceased, no uncovered remains from the excavation will be shown to the public.

“A lot of people in the community have expressed a desire that any human remains found not be displayed, and we’re certainly sympathetic to that,” Reid said. “We’ve got laws to protect the graves on the state and federal level. We certainly do not want to excavate any bodies.”

The archaeologists are working to cooperate with and respect the Shoshone people in order to uncover the history of the Bear River Massacre.

“I respect what they do and what they’re trying to do, which is trying to tell a story about what happened,” Parry said. “We can all learn from it, and the more we know about it, the more we understand it.”

http://news.hjnews.com/allaccess/archaeologists-study-largest-native-american-massacre-site-in-history/article_5b7ba8e9-923b-5cc2-a664-2a536c43a9ce.html



Edited by TheAlaniDragonRising - 08-Sep-2015 at 20:51
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30-Jul-2015 at 22:03

Lincoln’s hidden gems: Historic discoveries under East West Link Road

A snapshot into Lincoln’s past has been revealed by works to create a new £22 million East West Link Road through the city.

The demolition of properties such as the former Gadsby’s building on the corner of Tentercroft Street and High Street has provided a glimpse of history deep below the surface.

Artefacts dating as far back as Roman times have been laying beneath central city foundations for hundreds of years, and archaeological experts are helping to preserve the area’s roots.

Lincolnshire County Council have been working alongside Pre-Construct Archeological Services (PCAS) throughout the development.

The 1,080m2 site has been excavated to a depth of two metres within the footprint of the former Gadsby building.

Any finds which could be destroyed by leaving in place will be removed, cleaned and analysed before being archived and housed at The Collection in Lincoln.

PCAS director, Will Munford, said: “Due to its location, this site would have only been used intensively when the city was at its most prosperous – in the Roman, Medieval, Victorian periods.

“A Roman army arrived in Lincoln in 43AD and established a fortress. A ‘colonia’ settlement was then created with public buildings.

“Our excavation found evidence of a community with houses, workshops, a well, rubbish tips, outbuildings and a network of tracks and paths.

“We uncovered horse bones, broken pottery – including a bowl with a name scratched into it, lost coins, hair pins and other debris of daily life.

“Once the Romans left the city it fell into decline. Until Medieval times the area was prone to flooding and would have been wetland.

“This was alleviated with the construction of Sincil Dyke after which the area was busy again, with the establishment of a Carmelite Friary, churches and similar buildings to those that the Romans had once occupied.

“We found glimpses of this community –pottery, walls and a substantial amount of roof tiles from houses.”

Executive member for highways and transportation, Councillor Richard Davies, added: “The East-West Link road project has given us the opportunity to excavate an area of Lincoln which hasn’t been touched since Victorian times.

“It has become apparent that the Victorian’s did not place any importance on the preservation of history meaning that we have been able to dig up some amazing finds which has until now been hidden below two metres of soil and debris.”

http://thelincolnite.co.uk/2015/07/lincolns-hidden-gems-historic-discoveries-under-east-west-link-road/



Edited by TheAlaniDragonRising - 30-Jul-2015 at 22:16
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28-Jul-2015 at 07:16

'Oldest' Koran fragments found in Birmingham University

What may be the world's oldest fragments of the Koran have been found by the University of Birmingham.

Radiocarbon dating found the manuscript to be at least 1,370 years old, making it among the earliest in existence.

The pages of the Muslim holy text had remained unrecognised in the university library for almost a century.

The British Library's expert on such manuscripts, Dr Muhammad Isa Waley, said this "exciting discovery" would make Muslims "rejoice".

The manuscript had been kept with a collection of other Middle Eastern books and documents, without being identified as one of the oldest fragments of the Koran in the world...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-33436021


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