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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Archaeology news updates
    Posted: 11-Aug-2017 at 14:13
Originally posted by red clay

Alani, nothing posted


That's strange. It might be a browser thing as it's still working for me here. Never mind, here's the title and link.

We're getting closer than ever to reading the mysterious Herculaneum scrolls


Link to copy to your browser :- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oYvTUXFBdFo



Edited by TheAlaniDragonRising - 11-Aug-2017 at 14:23
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  Quote red clay Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Aug-2017 at 09:44
Alani, nothing posted
"Arguing with someone who hates you or your ideas, is like playing chess with a pigeon. No matter what move you make, your opponent will walk all over the board and scramble the pieces".
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09-Aug-2017 at 18:28
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  Quote Aeoli Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31-Jul-2017 at 10:11
The Ancient city Aphrodisias got into UNESCO list.

It is known with this two remainds


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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Apr-2017 at 21:21
ASU student finds clues to ancient funerary customs in broken pieces of stone
Arizona State University archaeology student Claudine Gravel-Miguel went into her field of study 10 years ago simply for love of travel. Now, after falling in love with the science as well, her research has taken her to the Caverna delle Arene Candide in Italy, where she made a surprising discovery that is changing the way scientists look at human culture in the Paleolithic.

Gravel-Miguel, a doctoral student in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change, freely admits that she initially chose to study archaeology because she wanted a job that would let her see new places. But after her first class, it was questions about people — past and present — that soon captured her interest.

Her research focuses on using new tools like computational modeling to see how climate change and geography impacted prehistoric human mobility and social networks. Although that's not as effused with Hollywood glam, Gravel-Miguel argues that this is the reality of 21st-century archaeology.

“It may be cliché, but I think there is still a misconception that archaeologists do all their work in the field,” she said. “One of the first things I tell people when I talk about my work is that most of us spend more time in the lab and on computers than out on the terrain.”

This ability to bring new perspectives to old archaeological puzzles is exactly what led Gravel-Miguel to a recent, groundbreaking discovery in the Caverna delle Arene Candide.

This site, a cave high up a limestone cliff, was made famous in the 1940s when researchers found the remains of around 20 hunter-gatherers who were buried there 13,000–11,000 years ago. Throughout decades of excavation, archaeologists have found (and mostly ignored) pieces of small oblong-shaped stones. But Gravel-Miguel and the site director, Julien Riel-Salvatore, noticed that the stones were out of place in the cave — they had smooth surfaces like river rocks and all shared the same long, flat shape.

When she expressed interest in these peculiar stones, Riel-Salvatore encouraged her to investigate them further.

“The pebble project actually almost fell in my lap,” she said. “To be honest, I thought it would be a very simple study.”

Gravel-Miguel and her team quickly deduced that the hunter-gatherers had looked for and specifically chosen these stones from nearby beaches. However, microscopic analysis also revealed that the stones held traces of ochre, a red pigment frequently used by prehistoric people to paint the bodies of the deceased.

So why were the majority of these stone application tools carefully selected, only to wind up broken in a cave some distance away? In her recently published paper, Gravel-Miguel proposes that people smashed them intentionally after use.

“One would have had to handle the pebble by wrapping the hand around it, which should have prevented a break along the short axis,” she said. “Therefore, the shape and use wear of the piece tell us that the pebbles were not likely broken by accident while they were being used.”

The intention behind the breaks suggests it was likely part of a ritual act that symbolically killed the stones’ power over the dead. Such practice has been documented in the Neolithic, but never before in the Paleolithic, making this case the oldest example ever recorded.

Additionally, Gravel-Miguel found that each broken stone the team excavated had pieces missing from its fragments. She found only two refitting parts, but these gave her a clue about the fate of the other absent pieces.

“The two pieces of one refitted pebble have very different patinas,” she explained. “One is red and the other white. This shows that the two pieces were not discarded in the same place after the break, which suggests that the break may have had some meaning and that some of the pieces may have been curated.”

In her paper, Gravel-Miguel uses this data to support a hypothesis that one piece of each stone was left at the cave, while another was taken by a loved one as a way to remember and connect with the dead.

“This research reveals a new dimension of the burial rituals that took place this far back in time and strengthens our assumption that death has always been a very important component in the life of the living,” she said.

One of the next steps for this project is to expand research into other nearby archaeological sites from the same time period. This will help the team figure out if the practice of stone-smashing and fragment-keeping is something that was done locally by one group, or something that was part of a broader culture shared throughout the region.

Gravel-Miguel has also been left curious about whether the ritually broken stones were deposited as grave goods — that is, intentionally placed in the burial — or if they were just tossed away after the ritual. To find out, she will need to go back to the artifact collection of the archaeologist who excavated the site in the 1940s.

“There’s a lot more work to be done on this topic. It’s exciting,” she said.

http://https://asunow.asu.edu/20170407-discoveries-love-and-death-paleolithic-asu-archaeology-student



Edited by TheAlaniDragonRising - 10-Apr-2017 at 21:24
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  Quote medenaywe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18-Mar-2017 at 23:48
...and religion is the same.Smile
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  Quote red clay Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18-Mar-2017 at 16:31
The brickwork is similar to the way a kiln was built in that era, the layout is similar as well.

"Arguing with someone who hates you or your ideas, is like playing chess with a pigeon. No matter what move you make, your opponent will walk all over the board and scramble the pieces".
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18-Mar-2017 at 15:31

Mysterious pyramid-shaped tomb discovered under Chinese construction site


Chinese archaeologist investigates a tomb in the shape of a pyramid

A mysterious pyramid-shaped tomb has been uncovered by archaeologists under a construction site in China.

The structure was discovered in a chamber alongside a similar cylinder-shaped coffin in Zhengzhou, Henan Province. 

Experts believe the chamber is a burial site, and could hail from the Han Dynasty (202 BC – 220 AD), China’s so-called “golden age”. 

Who was buried there and why remains a mystery, though the site is currently under investigation, reports the Dail Mail.

Chinese media have nicknamed it the “pyramid of Zhengzhou”, though at six feet tall it is unlikely to draw as many tourists as the real things in Egypt.

The area used to be a village, reports local media, but work was underway to build a new residential compound when the discovery was made. 

The chamber, which is 30 metres long and eight metres wide, was described by a local as “truly magical”.

“I’ve never seen anything like this,” he added.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/pyramid-tomb-mysterious-china-construction-site-archaeologist-zhengzhou-henan-province-han-dynasty-a7633821.html




Edited by TheAlaniDragonRising - 18-Mar-2017 at 15:41
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Feb-2017 at 20:06

Ancient burials and artefacts unearthed beneath Lincoln Eastern Bypass site

Archeological excavations ahead of the construction of the Lincoln Eastern Bypass have revealed historically significant burial grounds, high-status Roman buildings and an armoury of fascinating tools and artefacts.

Past communities, settlements and landscapes have been discovered by a team of more than 60 archaeologists.

Part of a Bronze Age cemetery have been found along with an Iron Age to Roman pre-Christian settlement and burial ground between 1,800 and 2,800 years old.

The remains of a 12th century tower on the site is believes to have been used as a possible beacon to warn off approaching threats at the time of the First Battle of Lincoln in 1141.

Investigations have been carried out between the River Witham and Washingborough Road since September to ensure that any remains affected by the new road are protected or recorded

Discoveries so far also include Mesolithic and Neolithic flint tools, Roman buildings, field systems, pottery kilns and a potential vineyard; a medieval monastic grange comprising a boundary wall, a potential stone tower and other substantial stone buildings.

The remains of post-medieval farm buildings, yards, and a water management system were also revealed on the site by Network Archaeology Ltd.

Company director and senior project manager Chris Taylor said: “The evidence we’ve seen so far suggests that small communities were already living in this area around 12,000 years ago and that it has been a favoured spot for human activity ever since.

“Potentially, the site could yield some very important discoveries. We’ve found signs of a high-status Roman building and, more interestingly, a possible Roman vineyard, which is rare north of the Home Counties.

“We’ve also found what could be the remains of a 12th century tower, which may have served as a beacon to warn of approaching threats or as a fort around the time of The Battle of Lincoln in 1141.

“There’s a lot more work to be done before we have the full picture, but what has been unearthed so far suggests it will be well worth the effort.”

Councillor Richard Davies, Executive Member for Highways and Transport a Lincolnshire County Council, said: “When building a new road, it’s not just about just about digging holes and putting in tarmac. Before this can happen, it is very important to undertake work to protect the heritage of the area and look at the archaeology underground before we start building.

“It’s really important that whenever you’re building a big piece of infrastructure, like the Lincoln Eastern Bypass, that work is done to find out what’s gone on here for thousands of years for future generations to learn from and understand.”

The excavations between the River Witham and Washingborough Road will be completed in early 2017 and will be followed by investigations at other sites along the route.

The Lincoln Eastern Bypass project is part-funded by a £50m Central Government capital grant and aims to minimise traffic congestion, support Lincoln’s growth as a principal urban centre, and enhance the inter-city environment.

The £96 million bypass is expected to be completed by 2018.

http://thelincolnite.co.uk/2017/02/ancient-burials-and-artefacts-unearthed-beneath-lincoln-eastern-bypass-site/



Edited by TheAlaniDragonRising - 26-Feb-2017 at 20:17
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Nov-2016 at 22:53

ARCHAEOLOGISTS FIND 2ND ANTIQUITY FORTRESS AT PREHISTORIC, THRACIAN ROCK SHRINE NEAR BULGARIA’S ANGEL VOYVODA

second previously unknown Antiquity fortress has been found by archaeologists a prehistoric and later Ancient Thracian rock shrine in an area known as Hasara near the town of Angel Voyvoda, Mineralni Bani Municipality, Haskovo District, in Southern Bulgaria.

In May-June 2016, the team of archaeologists led by Assoc. Prof. Zdravko Dimitrov from the National Institute and Museum of Archaeology in Sofia announced the discovery of an Ancient Roman fortress with an Early Christian church at the ancient rock shrine near Bulgaria’s Angel Voyvoda.

The Ancient Thracians were found to have used the Hasara shrine at about the period of the Trojan War.

In early 2016, Bulgarian archaeologists specializing in prehistoric shrines discovered the “Orlovi Skali“ (“Eagles’ Rocks”) Shrine, also located in Bulgaria’s Mineralni Bani Municipality, which includes not just rock niches and altarsbut also huge human faces hewn high into the rocks, and dates back to the 4th millennium BC. The shrine at “Eagles’ Rocks” has been likened to the Hasara Shrine near the town of Angel Voyvoda.

Now, during the winter conservation of the Roman structures exposed in the 2016 summer digs, Dimitrov’s archaeological team has identified a second, smaller fortress from the Antiquity period.

The newly found fortress is located on a hill known as “Malak Hasar" (“Little Hasar"), Mineralni Bani (“Mineral Baths”) Municipality has announced.

The discovery has led the archaeologists to hypothesize that both fortresses discovered in 2016 might have been part of a much larger fortification.

Dimitrov believes that they were in fact citadels within a wider fortress, with the first fortress, the one discovered in the summer on the Hasara hill being its main citadel.

During their conservation work on the site of the 2016 excavations, the archaeologists have carried out additional field research that was impossible over the summer because of the vegetation.

Dimitrov has noted that a stone disc which was used as an ancient sun clock, and was also discovered during the summer excavations, has now been found broken, most probably by treasure hunters.

He has vowed that the ancient sun clock will be restored, possibly with help from experts from abroad.

The lead archaeologist has made it clear that support by Mineralni Bani Mayor Myumyun Iskender will help the team continue the archaeological research on the Hasara site with its ancient rock shrine and Antiquity fortifications in 2017.

The entire Ancient Thracian (and prehistoric) archaeological complex near Bulgaria’s Angel Voyvoda, Mineralni Bani Municipality, Haskovo District, covers a total area of 50 decares (app. 12.5 acres).

The Roman and Early Byzantine fortress discovered in May-June 2016 dates back to the Late Antiquity, i.e. the 4th-5thcentury AD, and has a total area of 6-7 decares (app. 1.5 acres).

At the beginning of 2016, Prof. Ana Raduncheva and Assoc. Prof. Stefanka Ivanova, also from the National Institute and Museum of Archaeology in Sofia, who found the “Eagle’s Rocks” shrine, said that the prehistoric civilizationwhich established the numerous rock shrines in Bulgaria created an entire system of shrines spanning what was a huge holy territory.

Later, the Ancient Thracians used parts of these shrines, though not the entire holy territory. In later periods, such as the Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, the shrines were no longer used as originally intended, and a number of them were turned into fortresses.

This explanation could be relevant to the present discovery of the Antiquity fortresses at the shrine near Bulgaria’s Angel Voyvoda (the Roman Empire conquered all of Ancient Thrace south of the Danube in 46 AD).

The existence of an Early Christian church there also seems logical since it is known that after the adoption of Christianity in the Late Antiquity, numerous Christian temples were built on the spots of ancient and possibly even prehistoric pagan shrines on the territory of today’s Bulgaria.

http://archaeologyinbulgaria.com/2016/11/18/archaeologists-find-2nd-antiquity-fortress-at-prehistoric-thracian-rock-shrine-near-bulgarias-angel-voyvoda/



Edited by TheAlaniDragonRising - 19-Nov-2016 at 23:03
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30-Oct-2016 at 13:43

Ancient inn complex unearthed in Assos


Archaeological excavations in the ancient city of Assos, located in the northwestern Turkish province of Çanakkale’s Ayvacık district, have unearthed an inn complex. 
Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University Archaeology Department Professor Nurettin Arslan said works this year mostly focused on Byzantine era ruins in the inner parts of the ancient city. 

“In these excavations, we unearthed the ruins of a complex that could be considered an inn complex. The existence of this complex is mentioned in ancient sources but it has never been unearthed. The inn, where people were accommodated and patients were treated, is located behind the western gate,” said Arslan, who has been head of the excavations for 10 years.

“The complex has its own bakery, kitchen and cisterns. All the needs of visitors were met there. At the same time, there is a chapel for people to pray. Ancient resources from the Byzantine era provide information about the inn but none of them defined this structure and its location,” he added.

“If we are not wrong, thanks to the artifacts we have found we will be able to shed light on this structure: how it was operated, how many sections it had, and how they served. For example, finding more than one marble table in a room would should us that people dined there. Finding a small chapel would show that people were able to worship in the inn. There is more than one cistern and water well, as well as kitchens.

There are also many accommodation places connected to each other but no archaeological excavation has been able to locate such a structure. That is why we are sure we have unearthed a Byzantine-era structure,” Arslan said.

Revealing life at the time


He also said they unearthed residences that had collapsed during an earthquake that occurred in the Byzantine era in the lower agora section.

“This was probably a big residential complex where one of the notable Byzantine families lived. It collapsed in an earthquake and is an important find to reveal life in the era. As it collapsed in an earthquake, everything is in its own place. This gives us information about the materials used in the Byzantine structures and people’s lifestyles. It helps us reveal what people used in their homes,” said Arslan.

 “It needs some simple repairs. In particular, the late ancient era structures should be restored. We will do this as soon as possible. We have two big projects. One is an ancient city reception center, which will pass from the Cultural and Natural Heritage Conservation Board and for which we have received ministry approval.

 The other project is to unearth the main roads so that visitors can easily visit the site. The theater in the ancient city is one of the most beautiful theaters in Anatolia. Its restoration will start, after which the theater will be a unique place to organize social events in the region,” he added.  

Aristoteles lived here 


“All ancient sources inform that Aristotle lived here from 347 to 345 BC. He had six students here too and we know that he gave classes. This year has been declared the Year of Aristotle, and we have applied to UNESCO to include Assos in the UNESCO tentative world heritage list. Assos is mentioned in the Bible, so it is already well known. If it is also included in the UNESCO list, the number of visitors will increase. Tourism has been going through hard times in Turkey but we are making the environmental arrangements and restorations to host more people,” Arslan said.

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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25-Oct-2016 at 03:17

Huge ancient shipyard unearthed on Turkey’s Dana Island


A huge shipyard, believed to be the oldest in the world, has been discovered on Dana Island in the southern province of Mersin’s Silifke district. 
Academics believe that the huge shipyard, which includes nearly 270 slipways, could shed light on the 400-year “Dark Ages” of the Mediterranean over 1,000 years B.C. 

“This is the one and only in the world. The biggest shipyard that has been proven archaeologically in the world,” said Hakan Öniz, the head of Selçuk University’s Underwater Archaeology Department.

Öniz said they had started underwater works on the coasts of Mersin in 2015 in an attempt to discover archaeological artifacts and prohibited areas for diving on the coasts of Mersin, particularly in Silifke. 

He also added that they had determined the existence of archaeological wreckages in the region. “But the most exciting for us was an iron spur that we found at a depth of 35 meters and that was used as the weapon of warships in ancient ages. Such an iron spur has been found for the first time in the world,” Öniz said. 

The team has carried out works from west to east on the Selçuk 1 Scientific Research Ship and is continuing to work around the Dana Island, located two kilometers off the coast. 
“We were surprised when we found dozens of slipways in the northern part of the island in 2015,” Öniz said, adding that they were still working to determine the exact period these structures date back to.

“During works in 2016, we also unearthed a huge shipyard where 274 ships could be built at the same time. It is the only such shipyard in the world. We are continuing work to try to date it. Most probably it is the oldest shipyard in the world. We estimate that it was used around 1,200 B.C. in the Late Bronze Age,” he said. 

Island of the Denyen

Stating that the Dana Island most probably was known as the island of the Denyen, named the “Sea People” in the 12th century, Öniz said the Denyens were first mentioned by the Hittite King Telipinu around 1,500 B.C. “The Adania region, which King Telipinu mentioned, is the region of Adana and Mersin today,” he added.
“The reason why this era is called the ‘Dark Age’ is that we have limited archaeological information about a period of around 300-400 years. Most probably a big drought, earthquakes or epidemic disease occurred in the 13th century B.C. We can deduce this from the fact that Egyptian Pharaoh Ramses II had to send ships full of grain from the Alexandria region, which is usually productive and suitable for agriculture. Ancient sources suggest there was a famine around this era,” Öniz said. 

“Probably the Denyens, together with other groups suffering from the famine, attacked Egypt in order to get grain. Ramses III said the Egyptians defeated the Denyens and he sent the captured Denyens and others to remote regions as soldiers. He pursued the other Denyens to their island in the north and destroyed them there,” he added. 

 “But this story is not limited to the Deneyns and the Hittites. We know of the existence of the late Hittite kingdoms in the Cilicia region in the Iron Age. We know that they resisted against the New Babylon Kingdom that wanted their iron and grain. The name of the island became Pitusu in the Iron Age. The King of Babylon Neriglissar described Pitusu as a ‘mountain in the middle of the sea.’ He said he attacked it and 6,000 soldiers on this small island resisted against him. The existence of those 6,000 people reveals that the island continued serving as a shipyard in the Iron Age too,” Öniz said. 

“History effectively stopped on the island around 800 years ago. And the modern law of the Turkish Republic does not give permission for any work or restructuring on the island. It is now completely a part of the world heritage,” he added.


Edited by TheAlaniDragonRising - 25-Oct-2016 at 03:19
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-Oct-2016 at 18:29

PRE-COLUMBIAN MEDITERRANEAN ‘ROUND’ SHIP DISCOVERED FOR THE FIRST TIME BY UNDERWATER ARCHAEOLOGY EXPEDITION IN BULGARIA’S BLACK SEA ZONE

The sunken Pre-Columbian Mediterranean “round ship” in Bulgaria’s Black Sea zone is the first of its kind to have been discovered in full.

The world’s first ever well preserved sunken “round ship", a medieval Mediterranean ship which was a precursor to the Age of Discovery vessels such as the ones on which Christopher Columbus crossed the Atlantic, has beendiscovered in Bulgaria’s Black Sea zone by a large-scale underwater archaeology project, the Black Sea M.A.P.

The sunken “Western Mediterranean, possibly Venetian" ship (as it has been described) from the 13th-14h century is said to be a “discovery of global significance" because the round ship type (also known as “cog”) had been known from historical sources but a fully preserved one had never been seen since the Late Middle Ages – until its present discovery in Bulgaria’s Black Sea waters.

The other most intriguing sunken ships discovered by the archaeologists from Black Sea M.A.P. are a Byzantine shipfrom the late 9th or early 10th century, and an Ottoman Turkish vessel from the 18th-19th century.

The Black Sea Maritime Archaeology Project (Black Sea M.A.P.), which started in September 2015, is being carried out by the Center for Maritime Archaeology of the University of Southampton, the Sozopol-based Center for Underwater Archaeology at the Bulgarian Ministry of Culture, and the National Institute and Museum of Archaeology in Sofia.

The three year project, which is funded by the Expedition and Education Foundation (EEF), is also assisted by theUniversity of Connecticut, USA; the Maritime Archaeological Research InstituteSödertörn (MARIS), Södertörn University, Sweden; and the Hellenic Center for Marine ResearchGreece.

The results from the second voyage of the project, which took place on September 1-26, 2016, in the zone betweenBulgaria’s Rezovo in the south and Cape Galata near Varna, have been presented publicly in Bulgaria’s Black Sea ofBurgas by Prof. Jon Adams from the University of Southampton and Assoc. Prof. Lyudmil VagalinskiAssoc. Prof. Krum Bachvarov, and Assist. Prof. Kalin Dimitrov from Bulgaria’s National Institute and Museum of Archaeology inSofia.

“An expedition mapping drowned ancient landscapes in the Black Sea is making dramatic discoveries. An international team… is surveying the Bulgarian waters of the Black Sea where thousands of years ago large areas of land were inundated as the water level rose after the last Ice Age," the organizers of Black Sea M.A.P have announced in a release.

“During these surveys the team have also inspected more than 40 shipwrecks, many of which provide the first views of ship types known from historical sources but never before seen. Their astonishing preservation is due to the anoxic conditions of the Black Sea below 150 meters. Together the wrecks, which include those from the Ottoman and Byzantine Empires, provide new data on the maritime interconnectivity of Black Sea coastal communities and manifest ways of life and seafaring that stretch back into prehistory," the organizers inform....

http://archaeologyinbulgaria.com/2016/10/01/pre-columbian-mediterranean-round-ship-discovered-for-the-first-time-by-underwater-archaeology-expedition-in-bulgarias-black-sea-zone/



Edited by TheAlaniDragonRising - 04-Oct-2016 at 18:38
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Sep-2016 at 08:52

Rare 3,300 year-old secret passage, first Hittite skeleton found in central Turkey


A 3,300-year-old secret passage and a skeleton belonging to the Hittite period have been found during archeological excavations in Alacahöyük archeological site in central Anatolian province of Çorum, Turkey. The findings were compiled in a documentary entitled "Following the footsteps of history," shedding light on the lives of ancient peoples.
The discovery of the skeleton could have significant implications for historians, as it marks the first time a Hittite-era skeleton is found and could break new ground.

The excavation work in the site is carried out for the Ministry of Culture, by Ankara University.

Regarded as Turkey's first national excavation site, Alacahöyük is an archeological site that is home to Neolithic and Hittite settlement, where earliest examples of copper and stone tools can be found. It also contains royal tombs dating to the 3rd century BCE, with precious artifacts including jewelry, weapons, metal vessels and more.

http://www.dailysabah.com/history/2016/09/07/rare-3300-year-old-secret-passage-first-hittite-skeleton-found-in-central-turkey



Edited by TheAlaniDragonRising - 11-Sep-2016 at 09:11
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  Quote medenaywe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Sep-2016 at 02:09
Thank's aeoli. Link goes to topic! 
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  Quote Aeoli Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09-Sep-2016 at 13:25
A 2,100-year-old marble mother goddess sculpture of Kybele has been unearthed during excavations in the Black Sea province of Ordu’s Kurul Castle, one of the first archaeological digs in the region.

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/technology.aspx?pageID=417

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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09-Aug-2016 at 10:28

Battlefield Archaeologists Find Oregon Indian War Anything But Ancient History


During the decade before the U.S. Civil War, a different conflict made a big impact on the future of the Oregon Territory. It’s known as the Rogue River Indian War. But unlike the Civil War battlefields in the eastern U.S. or American South that receive hundreds of thousands of visitors annually, you’ll be hard pressed to tour — or even find — those battlefields.

Now a series of archaeological investigations is resurrecting this Northwest history.

The Rogue River Indian War was an uprising against miners and settlers in southwest Oregon from 1855–56. There were massacres, reprisals, pitched battles and a final forced expulsion of native tribes from their homelands to distant reservations.

Looking back from 160 years later, two things stand out: Artifacts from the mostly-forgotten battles lie just beneath the surface. And the human interest in the conflict among descendants and neighbors takes minimal prodding to unearth too.....

http://www.opb.org/news/article/oregon-indian-war-battlefield-archaeologists/



Edited by TheAlaniDragonRising - 09-Aug-2016 at 10:30
What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.
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  Quote red clay Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Mar-2016 at 12:07
I saw this the other day. I wonder if this is the same group that's found the hulls of 3 U Boats, not previously known of. It's the same gen. area.
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Mar-2016 at 10:47

Significant Civil War-Era Shipwreck Discovered Off N.C. Coast

Kure Beach

Another pearl in the form of a large iron-hulled Civil War era steamer has been discovered in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of N.C., near Oak Island. Researchers and archaeologists from the Underwater Archaeology Branch of the North Carolina Office of State Archaeology and the Institute of International Maritime Research made the discovery Saturday, Feb. 27 during sonar operations.

The vessel is believed to possibly be the remains of one of three blockade runners used to penetrate the wall of Union naval vessels blocking the port of Wilmington during the Civil War. The goal of the Union blockade was to keep supplies from reaching the Confederacy through one of its most important ports and to prevent the export of cotton and other marketable items by the Southerners. The wreck is located 27 miles downstream from Wilmington near Fort Caswell at the mouth of the Cape Fear River, and is the first Civil War-era vessel discovered in the area in decades.

"A new runner is a really big deal," said Billy Ray Morris, Deputy State Archaeologist-Underwater and Director of the Underwater Archaeology Branch. "The state of preservation on this wreck is among the best we've ever had."

Researchers will continue working to positively identify the vessel. Three blockade runners are known to have been lost in the area, the Agnes E. FrySpunkie and Georgianna McCaw. These operations are part of a major project funded by the National Park Service through the American Battlefield Protection Program.

Historical, cartographic and archaeological resources have been examined for the past two years to better understand the maritime components of the Fort Fisher campaign. Fortifications protected both entrances to the Cape Fear River from the Atlantic and were critical in keeping open a lifeline to the Confederacy until Fort Fisher fell in January 1865.

Researchers aboard the Research Vessel Atlantic Surveyor recorded the complete hull of the vessel. Students from the East Carolina University Maritime Studies Program will join the team as they continue gathering data on the new site as the weather permits.

The Underwater Archaeology Branch within the Office of State Archaeology is part of the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

http://www.ncdcr.gov/press-release/significant-civil-war-era-shipwreck-discovered-nc-coast




Edited by TheAlaniDragonRising - 11-Mar-2016 at 10:57
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  Quote red clay Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06-Feb-2016 at 10:18
Paleoarchaic, those are the folks I search for here. It's interesting that they are using the same strategies I use for locating possible sites.
I'm using Google earth, I'm sure they use more sophisticated tech.

The earliest documented site here was dated at about 10,000 ybp. I'm fairly sure presence here goes back farther.

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