Notice: This is the official website of the All Empires History Community (Reg. 10 Feb 2002)

  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Register Register  Login Login

Who contributed more to Mathematics?

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
Poll Question: Who contributed more to Mathematics?
Poll Choice Votes Poll Statistics
4 [22.22%]
1 [5.56%]
0 [0.00%]
0 [0.00%]
7 [38.89%]
0 [0.00%]
3 [16.67%]
2 [11.11%]
0 [0.00%]
1 [5.56%]
0 [0.00%]
You can not vote in this poll

Author
Cyrus Shahmiri View Drop Down
Administrator
Administrator
Avatar
King of Kings

Joined: 07-Aug-2004
Location: Iran
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 6217
  Quote Cyrus Shahmiri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Who contributed more to Mathematics?
    Posted: 23-Aug-2009 at 13:07
I found these names here: http://www.ebookee.com/A-History-of-Mathematics-From-Mesopotamia-to-Modernity_70164.html I am watching an Iranian TV serial about Jamshid Kashani (al-Kashi), I didn't know him but he seems to be one of the greatest mathematicians in the world, he is called the true inventor of the calculator, the inventor of decimal fractions, he calculated pi to 14 decimal places (3.14159265358979) from just 3 correct decimal places, ...

Edited by Cyrus Shahmiri - 23-Aug-2009 at 13:10
Back to Top
red clay View Drop Down
Administrator
Administrator
Avatar
Tomato Master Emeritus

Joined: 14-Jan-2006
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 10109
  Quote red clay Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Aug-2009 at 14:04

You left out a very important name.  Ida Mae Bernkoff.  It was Ida who, upon recognizing I had no math apptitude whatsoever, made a deal with me.  She would give me a C grade for the first 2 semesters, if I pulled out of advanced math, thus advancing the future of math considerably.Big smile

Back to Top
Kamran the Great View Drop Down
Janissary
Janissary
Avatar

Joined: 03-May-2006
Location: New Zealand
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 10
  Quote Kamran the Great Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Aug-2009 at 14:29

can names be added to the list? Biruni and Khayyam are missing !!!!

Back to Top
Cryptic View Drop Down
Arch Duke
Arch Duke

Retired AE Moderator

Joined: 05-Jul-2006
Location: United States
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 1962
  Quote Cryptic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Aug-2009 at 14:47

I would go for Newton / Leibnitz from this list. Both discovered calculus, but Newton had a far better publicity machine. In my opinion, the greatest mathematician that ever lived was Karl Gauss or perhaps some of the 17th-18th French Mathematicians.

As side note, the Indian Srinivasa Ramanujan was said to have incredible potential. Unfortunatly, he died young (during WWI) of health issues possibly complicated by mental illness. His full potential was never shown. 


Edited by Cryptic - 23-Aug-2009 at 21:17
Back to Top
Cyrus Shahmiri View Drop Down
Administrator
Administrator
Avatar
King of Kings

Joined: 07-Aug-2004
Location: Iran
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 6217
  Quote Cyrus Shahmiri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Aug-2009 at 04:02
Originally posted by Kamran the Great

can names be added to the list? Biruni and Khayyam are missing !!!!

 
There are several other ones like Nasir al-Din Tusi in Trigonometry or Sharaf al-Din Tusi in Algebraic Geometry but al-Kashi and al-Khwarizmi, the founder of Algebra and Algorithm, are the greatest Persian mathematicians.
Back to Top
LuisG View Drop Down
Immortal Guard
Immortal Guard
Avatar

Joined: 30-Sep-2009
Location: Cuba
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 1
  Quote LuisG Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30-Sep-2009 at 11:10
There's so many mathematicians absent here: Riemann, Gauss or Nother. It depends in which area we focus, the Modern Number Theory  will not exist without Gauss contributions. The same happens in Differential Geometry with Riemann or in Abstract Algebra without Emmy Nother
... and justice for all
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest
Guest
  Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30-Sep-2009 at 13:18
al-Khwarizmi isnt persian. He  is ozbek Turk.
Back to Top
Gharanai View Drop Down
Arch Duke
Arch Duke
Avatar
Afghan Empire

Joined: 26-Jan-2006
Location: Afghanistan
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 1515
  Quote Gharanai Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30-Sep-2009 at 15:26
For sure there is no Maths without the degit (0), so that means there is no Maths without al-Khwarizmi, my vote to the great man of history whose intentions were great and of which the world has developed the now so called Computers (imagin a computer without 0, that would be a hard guess).


Back to Top
Spey View Drop Down
Janissary
Janissary

suspended

Joined: 31-Jul-2005
Location: Te Vahi'Pounamu
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 22
  Quote Spey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30-Sep-2009 at 16:25

 

Study this brief wiki page 0(number) , for the background and origin of the spacer , the point and the zero in maths .

It seems that it just sort of grew over the centuries Smile
Back to Top
Gharanai View Drop Down
Arch Duke
Arch Duke
Avatar
Afghan Empire

Joined: 26-Jan-2006
Location: Afghanistan
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 1515
  Quote Gharanai Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30-Sep-2009 at 16:45

Dear Spey, what I was refering to is:

"In the twelfth century, one of his major works (Book on Addition and Subtraction after the Method of the Indians) was translated into Latin, bringing the positional number system and the number 'zero' to the Western world (Seife, 2000). " Reference: History of Algebra
 
You see the western world used to have the Latin digit system of (i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. vii. viii. ix. x. xi. xii. xiii. xiv. xv ...) where they knew nothing about zero. So it was Al Khwarazmi's work that introduced it to the western world.
 
 


Back to Top
Spey View Drop Down
Janissary
Janissary

suspended

Joined: 31-Jul-2005
Location: Te Vahi'Pounamu
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 22
  Quote Spey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30-Sep-2009 at 17:00
Originally posted by Gharanai

Dear Spey, what I was refering to is:

"In the twelfth century, one of his major works (Book on Addition and Subtraction after the Method of the Indians) was translated into Latin, bringing the positional number system and the number 'zero' to the Western world (Seife, 2000). " Reference: History of Algebra
 
You see the western world used to have the Latin digit system of (i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. vii. viii. ix. x. xi. xii. xiii. xiv. xv ...) where they knew nothing about zero. So it was  Al Khwarazmi's  work that introduced it to the western world.
 
 
 
And that has what  to do with me ?
 
Where have I mentioned Al Khwarazmi ?
 
 
Back to Top
Siege Tower View Drop Down
Colonel
Colonel
Avatar

Joined: 28-Aug-2006
Location: Edmonton,Canada
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 580
  Quote Siege Tower Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01-Oct-2009 at 10:13
How about John von Neumann, the founder of modern computer science; and game theory, which is applicable to virtually every scientific deciplines from economics, political science, biology, psychology, quantom physics to even military strategy.
Back to Top
Cryptic View Drop Down
Arch Duke
Arch Duke

Retired AE Moderator

Joined: 05-Jul-2006
Location: United States
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 1962
  Quote Cryptic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01-Oct-2009 at 18:20
Originally posted by Siege Tower

How about John von Neumann, the founder of modern computer science; and game theory, which is applicable to virtually every scientific deciplines from economics, political science, biology, psychology, quantom physics to even military strategy.
Though I lack the technical knowledge to defend my opinion well, I think that game theory is way over rated. Most systems are too complex and too chaotic to be "game theoried".
 
For example, the two ivy league math professors who "game theoried" stock market options did very well..... for about four years and then chaos took over. They then went bankrupt fast.  In other applications, emotional humans may constantly change their understanding of the "game" and their goals and thus throw off any game theory applications.


Edited by Cryptic - 01-Oct-2009 at 18:24
Back to Top
Giannis View Drop Down
Baron
Baron
Avatar

Joined: 25-May-2006
Location: Greece
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 493
  Quote Giannis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02-Oct-2009 at 07:20
I was thinking of Pythagoras, but his contribution was mostly in geometry.
Give me a place to stand and I will move the world.
Back to Top
Cyrus Shahmiri View Drop Down
Administrator
Administrator
Avatar
King of Kings

Joined: 07-Aug-2004
Location: Iran
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 6217
  Quote Cyrus Shahmiri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02-Oct-2009 at 12:49
I think we just don't know the names of Babylonian mathematicians, they were certainly among the greatest ones.
 
A math problem assigned to Babylonian kids about 4,000 years ago:
 
 
Here's the problem:
 
Suppose you have two equilateral triangles, one inside the other. Can you figure out the area of the space between the two triangles? Here's a hint: see how you can divide the area into three trapezoids?
 
Back to Top
opuslola View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar
Avatar
suspended

Joined: 23-Sep-2009
Location: Long Beach, MS,
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 4621
  Quote opuslola Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-Oct-2009 at 18:22
I did not vote in the above test! But for those of you who did, I would like to entertain the thought that the winner, is by p;roxy if nothing else, ordained to win! It is more like a question, "if you could die for Christ, or Moses, or Allah, just whom would you most likely vote for?

IE, a fixed question with a fixed response, expected!

Can any one of you deny it?

Please see; "Few details of al-Khwārizmī's life are known with certainty, even his birthplace is unsure. His name may indicate that he came from Khwarezm (Khiva), then in Greater Khorasan, which occupied the eastern part of the Persian Empire, now Xorazm Province in Uzbekistan. Abu Rayhan Biruni calls the people of Khwarizm "a branch of the Persian tree".[10]", the above is from Wikipedia!

Thus the winner of the test question can only be correct if he or she does not ever look at the possibility that this person "never existed", or at least that this person never wrote within the period where he is now expected to reside! This is called "revisionism!"

Thus, just what reliability can be established for the above "winner?"



Edited by opuslola - 03-Oct-2009 at 20:00
http://www.quotationspage.com/subjects/history/
Back to Top
Nurica View Drop Down
Knight
Knight


Joined: 26-May-2010
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 56
  Quote Nurica Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-May-2010 at 20:24

looking to the results of "popular vote", one don't need an astrologer to tell him that middle easterners are majority here!  Cool

Hilbert, Leibnitz and Newton as insignificant people, that's very new as a trend in history of math., isn't it?

Back to Top
Cyrus Shahmiri View Drop Down
Administrator
Administrator
Avatar
King of Kings

Joined: 07-Aug-2004
Location: Iran
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 6217
  Quote Cyrus Shahmiri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-May-2010 at 23:06
looking to the results of "popular vote", one don't need an astrologer to tell him that middle easterners are majority here!  Cool
The only middle easterner in the list is al-Kashi who has no vote.
Back to Top
Nurica View Drop Down
Knight
Knight


Joined: 26-May-2010
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 56
  Quote Nurica Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-May-2010 at 00:40
so we have to admit that westerners really don't know about such guys bigggggg in maths like leibnitz, newton or hilbert? And by the way, by which mean established yout the ethnicity/religion of those writing here? (or your conclusion is based only on the country of origin????)
Back to Top
Cyrus Shahmiri View Drop Down
Administrator
Administrator
Avatar
King of Kings

Joined: 07-Aug-2004
Location: Iran
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 6217
  Quote Cyrus Shahmiri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-May-2010 at 01:43
so we have to admit that westerners really don't know about such guys bigggggg in maths like leibnitz, newton or hilbert?
They certainly know but they have to learn algebra at school!
 
And by the way, by which mean established yout the ethnicity/religion of those writing here? (or your conclusion is based only on the country of origin????)
I don't know what you mean, for example I think Leibniz was a German mathematician (from Leipzig in Germany), however he wrote primarily in Latin and French, don't you think so?
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Bulletin Board Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 9.56a [Free Express Edition]
Copyright ©2001-2009 Web Wiz

This page was generated in 0.156 seconds.