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Historical Jewels of your country

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Cyrus Shahmiri View Drop Down
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  Quote Cyrus Shahmiri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Historical Jewels of your country
    Posted: 23-Mar-2005 at 03:09

The Jewels of Iran are by far the largest and most dazzling jewel collection in the world. Not even the British jewels can come enything close to it's size and magnificence. So valuable is the collection that it backs the Iranian national currency as a reserve.


Darya-ye Noor (The world's largest uncut diamond)

"Darya-ye Noor" in Persian means "The Sea of Light". This is the sister diamond to the world's largest cut diamond, the "Kooh-e Noor" which is its Persian name and means "The Mountain of Light". At present it is kept in the Tower of London.


The Jeweled Globe (over 51 thousand gemstones and 35 kilograms of pure gold)

The jeweled globe is made entirely of gold and jewels. The globe portrays the world's seas and oceans with emerald, the lands with ruby, Southeast Asia, Iran and England with diamond, India with amethyst and central and South Africa with sapphire. The equator and other geographical boundaries are marked by diamond.

Nadir Shah looted many countries (especially India) and built something in his capital that as I said in "Islamic World" forum, is an Islamic wonder:


Of course the golden dome and minaret of Imamreza were recoated with pure gold in the period between 1601 to 1607 by Shah Abbas the Great.


But this one was built by Nadir Shah which I think is the most expensive building in the world!



Edited by Cyrus Shahmiri
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Capt. Lubber View Drop Down
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  Quote Capt. Lubber Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Mar-2005 at 17:25
We have the crown jewels, they're not over the top pretty, but I like them
I couldn't find any good, bigger pictures

King's Crown


King's sword


King's scepter


Queen's crown


Queen's scepter


Heir of the throne's crown


Most of this was made in 1818, the sword was given to marshall Jean-Baptiste Bernadotte (later king Carl Johan of Sweden) by Napoleon after the battle of Leipzig
Loke, Attila, the grete conqueror,
Deyde in his sleep, with shame and dishonour,
Bleedinge ay at the nose in dronkenesse,
A captayin shoulde live in sobrenesse
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  Quote dark_one Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Mar-2005 at 17:49


Pretty obvious what those are.
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  Quote Alparslan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Mar-2005 at 02:44
Originally posted by Cyrus Shahmiri

So valuable is the collection that it backs the Iranian national currency as a reserve.

Sorry but this is a myth. First Iranian currency is not a reserve money. Second these kind of national heritages can not be influenced on level of currencies of host countries. Forget about these kind of "city legends".

 

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  Quote Cyrus Shahmiri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Mar-2005 at 05:06

Sorry but this is a myth. First Iranian currency is not a reserve money. Second these kind of national heritages can not be influenced on level of currencies of host countries. Forget about these kind of "city legends".

Maybe you are right, I hope Mullahs have not sold them!

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  Quote Cassivellaunus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Mar-2005 at 15:11

The Stone of Scone is the most sacred 'jewel' of Scotland. The English were so jealous of its gravelly texture, vivid beauty and wonderous solidity that they were always trying to steal it. They finally succeeded and kept it under the throne to spite the Scots. It is now kept under the coronation chair in Westminister Abbey as it is too precious to be laid with the utter rubbish in the Tower of London. You can clearly see why the English wanted it so much...it makes the crown jewels look like mere trinkets in a pawn shop!

The English King was said to have remarked: "We've stripped the Scottish of their wealth, so we might as well take their rock as well!" (he most likely phrased it differently though)

"Why do you cower in your trenches, men? They couldn't hit an elephant at this distance!"
- Last words of General John Sedgewick
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  Quote Hardel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31-Mar-2005 at 04:41
Mongolians were prefer Iron.
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  Quote Thracian Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-Apr-2005 at 04:48

Here is the oldest gold of the world - in Varna, Bulgaria

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  Quote ramin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-Apr-2005 at 04:54
sorry if it sounds silly, but which one?!
"I won't laugh if a philosophy halves the moon"
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Cyrus Shahmiri View Drop Down
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  Quote Cyrus Shahmiri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-Apr-2005 at 08:30
and how old is this?
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  Quote Thracian Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-Apr-2005 at 19:21

all of those are;

they are from around 7000 years ago

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  Quote ramin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-Apr-2005 at 21:54
interesting and really beautiful 
"I won't laugh if a philosophy halves the moon"
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  Quote Paul Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-Apr-2005 at 22:08

Koh-i-Noor (Mountain of Light)

Koh-i-noorIn April 2002, a few days after the death of Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, her crown was taken from behind its ultra-high-security armoured glass in the Tower of London and carried in open view through the streets of London, surmounting her coffin as it processed from St James's Palace to Westminster Hall. It remained there during her Lying-in-State as members of the public filed past to pay their last respects to the Queen Mother, the last Empress of India.

Interestingly enough, she had only ever worn this crown once, 65 years earlier, at the Coronation of herself and her husband, King George VI, in 1937. The largest and most important jewel in this crown is the priceless Koh-i-noor Diamond, which had been presented to Queen Victoria by Lord Dalhousie in June 1850. This followed the British annexation of the Punjab, India, after the British had defeated the Sikhs. From that date the diamond became part of the British Crown Jewels.

The Origins of the Koh-i-noor

Some say that the Koh-i-noor was originally found more than 5000 years ago, and is mentioned in ancient Sanskrit writings. Devout Hindus claim that it was once worn by the great god Krishna, but was stolen from him as he lay sleeping. By contrast, another source has it that the diamond was discovered in a river bed in 3200 BC. The first reliable evidence of it, however, is in the writings of Babur, the founder of the Mogul Empire, who names this diamond as part of the treasure won by Ala-ud-deen (Aladdin) at the conquest of Malwah in 1304 AD. The Moguls acquired the diamond in 1526.

At that time it was said to weigh 793 carats, but through some incredibly ham-fisted cutting and polishing by a jeweller named Borgio it was reduced to 186 carats. Borgio had been working on it for years, but so enraged was Aurungzebe (the Emperor at the time) at the result that he confiscated all Borgio's worldly goods and contemplated executing him as well.

How the Koh-i-noor Got Its Name

The Koh-i-noor remained with the Mogul emperors until 1739, when Nadir Shah of Persia, the conqueror of India, got hold of it after laying siege to Delhi. According to legend it was a member of the harem of the Mogul Emperor Mohammed Shah who told Nadir Shah that the jewel was kept hidden in the Emperor's turban. So, at a victory celebration, Nadir used a cunning ploy. He suggested that he and the Emperor partake in a well-known Oriental custom whereby the two leaders would exchange turbans. This would symbolise their close ties and eternal friendship. For the Mogul to refuse would have been a great insult to the conqueror. Later that night, when Nadir Shah unfolded his host's turban he duly found the gem, and cried out 'Koh-i-noor', which means 'mountain of light'. Nadir Shah then brought the jewel back with him to Persia.

From Persia to Afghanistan to India

After the death of Nadir Shah the Koh-i-noor came through devious means into the possession of Ahmed Shah, the Lord of the Royal Treasury and an Afghan chief. Then Ahmed Shah, after a series of long and fierce battles, established himself in Kabul as King of Afghanistan, and held on to 'the great diamond' as a symbol of his authority. Through various subsequent upheavals and rebellions the diamond came back into the possession of the Indian princes, until the annexation of the Punjab secured it for the British.

The British

The British colonial officials found the Koh-i-noor in 1849, in the treasury of the Punjabi capital, Lahore. They confiscated everything they found in the treasury as compensation for having to fight against the Sikh army, who didn't think much of the British claims to power in India.

Sir John Lawrence, Governor General of India, used to tell the story of how the Sikhs handed the diamond to him in a plain old battered tin box, which he then forgot about. Weeks later London was asking him if he had any idea where the diamond was. He replied in the negative. Then came a second, more urgent letter, in which London expressed a desire to present the jewel to the Queen. Following another negative reply, the Prime Minister himself, Lord Palmerston, sent a plea. Sir John searched high and low but couldn't find it, until one of his servants remembered there was 'a bit of glass in an old tin box'. Luckily the servant was the sort of person who never throws anything away, and eventually discovered it in the tool-shed. There it was, not even wrapped - the most famous gem of India, the fabled Koh-i-noor, the 'Mountain of Light', the jewel to die for (and very many unfortunate people had done just that). And Lawrence didn't have the faintest idea what it was.

The Curse of the Koh-i-noor

The British were rather disappointed at the lack of 'fire' in the diamond, and so they decided it should be re-cut to make it more brilliant. This further reduced it from 186 carats to its present size of just under 109 carats. Over centuries of murder and mayhem, brutality and torture - not to mention deceit and duplicity - the stone had long carried with it a curse that misfortune would always befall its owner, though any woman wearing it would remain unharmed. There was some talk of whether Queen Victoria would return the stone because of the curse. Defiant as always, however, she was adamant it should instead be re-cut and set in a tiara along with over 2000 other royal diamonds.

In 1911 a new crown was made for the coronation of Queen Mary, with the Koh-i-noor at its centre. Then in 1937 the stone was transferred to another new crown, this time for the coronation of Elizabeth (later to become the Queen Mother) as Queen Consort and Empress of India.

Conflicting Claims

In October 1997, Queen Elizabeth II made a State Visit to India and Pakistan to mark the 50th anniversary of Independence. Many Sikhs in India and Britain used the occasion to demand the return of the Koh-i-noor diamond , which had been won from the Sikhs (whose ruler was Duleep Singh, a young boy at the time) after a fierce battle. But the Sikhs had surrendered, and one of the terms of the surrender was that they hand over the diamond. A simple Punjabi farmer in his 70s, Beant Singh Sandhawalia, has claimed to be the last surviving descendant of Duleep Singh, through adoption. He wrote to Buckingham Palace and to Prime Minister Tony Blair asking for the return of the Koh-i-noor. Sandhawalia says he doesn't want the Koh-i-noor for himself, but will give it to the museum at the Golden Temple of Amritsar, the holiest Sikh shrine.

The Sikhs, however, are not the only people who want the diamond. In November 2000 the Taleban regime demanded the return of the Koh-i-noor diamond to Afghanistan, saying that the British should hand the gem back to them as soon as possible. They have claimed that it is the property of Afghanistan, and that history shows that it went to India from Afghanistan and therefore the Afghans have a stronger claim than the Indians. While an Indian parliamentary committee has insisted that the gem be sent back to New Delhi, the Taleban have claimed that Maharajah Ranjit Singh (the father of Duleep Singh) stole it from Afghanistan while he was ruler of the Punjab.

British officials take the view that the multiplicity of competing claims makes it impossible to establish the gem's former ownership. Thus, for now, at least, it looks likely to remain one of the jewels in the British Crown.

http://www.original-diamonds.com/famous_kohinoor.php



Edited by Paul
Light blue touch paper and stand well back

http://www.maquahuitl.co.uk

http://www.toltecitztli.co.uk
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Ollios View Drop Down
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  Quote Ollios Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09-Nov-2011 at 18:54
Spoonmaker's Diamond from Turkey

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spoonmaker%27s_Diamond


These are ottoman


This is the biggest symbol of Lydia Empire but it was stolen





Edited by Ollios - 09-Nov-2011 at 18:55
Ellerin Kabe'si var,
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Feb-2012 at 18:50
Varna Necropolis, 5000 BC, supposedly the oldest golden treasures in Europe - rings, necklaces from golden beads, golden application to be sown on clothes.
http://www.omda.bg/images_more/varna_necropolis_treasure_2.jpg
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