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non-Jewish Iranians and Ashkenazi Jews

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rhazes View Drop Down
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  Quote rhazes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: non-Jewish Iranians and Ashkenazi Jews
    Posted: 18-Mar-2005 at 18:22
Journal article published in "Human Immunology"

Identical MHC Markers in Non-Jewish Iranian and Ashkenazi Jewish Patients with Pemphigus Vulgaris: Possible Common Central Asian Ancestral Origin

Narciss MobiniA, Edmond J. YunisB, C, D, E, *, Chester A. AlperB, F, *, Juan J. YunisB, C, Julio C. DelgadoC, E, David E. YunisB, AliReza FiroozA, Yahya DowlatiG, Kamal BaharH, Peter K. GregersenI and A. Razzzaque AhmedA, B

ABSTRACT: Previous studies showed that almost all Ashkenazi Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris carried the extended haplotype [HLA-B38, SC21, DRB1*0402, DQB1*0302] or [HLA-B35, SC31, DRB1*0402, DQB1*0302] or class II fragments of them. Non-Jewish patients carried [HLA-B55, SB45, DRB1*1401, DQB1*0503] or its class II fragments. In the present study of 20 Iranian patients with pemphigus vulgaris, 17 were found to carry DRB1*0402, DQB1*0302 haplotypes, also found among normal Iranian haplotypes and the same as that of the Jews. These findings suggest that the pemphigus MHC susceptibility gene among Iranians derived from the same ancestor as that in the Ashkenazim. The ancient Jews were under Persian domination from 500 B.C. until 300 B.C. and in the 8th century A.D., a Tataric people living in the kingdom of Khazar on the Western shore of the Caspian Sea and the Northern shore of the Black Sea, near Persia, converted to Judaism, providing possible opportunities for gene mixing in two populations that are distinct and separate today.

The lab I work in has rights to "Science Direct" hosted papers, so I'll host the .pdf file soon.

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Alparslan View Drop Down
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  Quote Alparslan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Mar-2005 at 10:15

Originally posted by rhazes

and in the 8th century A.D., a Tataric people living in the kingdom of Khazar on the Western shore of the Caspian Sea and the Northern shore of the Black Sea, near Persia,

They were not Tataric. There is not that kind of therminology. Khazars were Turkic.

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rhazes View Drop Down
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  Quote rhazes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Mar-2005 at 14:32
It's true that the tartars were likely "turkic" in origin, but they were far removed from other turkic tribes. Regardless, that is merely a historical hypothesis they forwarded, the facts they provide speak for themselves. The study drew upon random ethnic samples (including Turkic samples), and no sort of haplotype correlate existed outside of the strong Ashkenazi-Iranian connection.
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Miller View Drop Down
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  Quote Miller Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Mar-2005 at 17:15
Interesting,

I don't see if the study was extended to the Mizrahi, and Sephardi  Jewish patients


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