Notice: This is the official website of the All Empires History Community (Reg. 10 Feb 2002)

  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Register Register  Login Login

Which is the original language of your country?

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <12
Author
King John View Drop Down
Chieftain
Chieftain
Avatar

Joined: 01-Dec-2006
Location: United States
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 1366
  Quote King John Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Which is the original language of your country?
    Posted: 19-Nov-2007 at 02:12
Pinguin, you could try this site:
http://www.croeso-cynnes-wales.co.uk/iaith/meaning.html

(just copy and paste it for it to work)

--------------------------------------------------
Janus Rook: (The hyperlink should be working now, you may just click the link).


Edited by JanusRook - 20-Nov-2007 at 10:26
Back to Top
Windemere View Drop Down
Samurai
Samurai
Avatar

Joined: 09-Oct-2007
Location: United States
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 103
  Quote Windemere Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Nov-2007 at 02:39
My father grew up on a farm in western Ireland in the early 1900's during a time when the language was changing over from Gaelic to English. Parents, grandparents, and children all lived together in the same house. Grandparents spoke Gaelic. Parents grew up speaking both Gaelic and English. The children spoke English, though they understood Gaelic. English was the language of economic opportunity and business while Gaelic limited people to local farming culture so it was advantageous to know English.
 
He moved to  western Massachusetts (already mentioned) and a few of  the local  towns here (such as Agawam and Chicopee) have names from the old Algonquian Indian language, especially the ones that were built on the sites of old Indian villages.
Windemere
Back to Top
longshanks31 View Drop Down
Colonel
Colonel
Avatar

Joined: 03-Jul-2007
Location: Great Britain
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 572
  Quote longshanks31 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Nov-2007 at 11:02
Originally posted by Patch

Originally posted by longshanks31

it was gaelic here i think, after many waves of people coming here, its divided into three forms, welsh, scotch gaelic and the almost extinct cornish gaelic.
In the scheme of things english as we know it is quite modern.
 
No such thing as 'Cornish Gaelic' Cornish is a Brythonic 'p' Celtic language very similar to Welsh and Breton..  Gaelic is a 'q' Celtic language originally spoken in Ireland and related to the Celti Iberian 'q' Celtic.
 
Earliest known language of mainland UK was an early form of Welsh, which depending on which theory you believe was very similar to Gaulish. 
 
 
cheers patch, you dont know if cornish is still spoken atall do you
long live the king of bhutan
Back to Top
Al Jassas View Drop Down
Arch Duke
Arch Duke
Avatar

Joined: 07-Aug-2007
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 1810
  Quote Al Jassas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Nov-2007 at 14:41
My "English" professor was ironically a welsh nationalist, at home and communication with family, he only spoke Welsh. He memorized many beautiful welsh song that I understood nothing of them. He told me that in his home town, near Anglesey, English is very rare and even children do not speak the language amongst themselves.
 
Al-Jassas
Back to Top
Styrbiorn View Drop Down
Caliph
Caliph


Joined: 04-Aug-2004
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 2810
  Quote Styrbiorn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Nov-2007 at 14:50

Originally posted by pinguin

Originally posted by Styrbiorn

South Sweden: Swedish/Danish/Norwegian. North Sweden: Sami.


Sami!


That's interesting! Besides the language of the Norse it is also interesting... samples please...


I don't know any Sami I'm afraid, so I can only link to wiki's page (written by Sami people, so it should be decent): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sami_languages
Back to Top
Temujin View Drop Down
King
King
Avatar
Sirdar Bahadur

Joined: 02-Aug-2004
Location: Eurasia
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 5221
  Quote Temujin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Nov-2007 at 17:20
Originally posted by pinguin

 
Are there where you live names that people don't know the meaning in German? That would be interesting to find out.


can't think of any at the moment...
Back to Top
Patch View Drop Down
Samurai
Samurai
Avatar

Joined: 19-Apr-2006
Location: England
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 119
  Quote Patch Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Nov-2007 at 23:30
Originally posted by longshanks31

Originally posted by Patch

Originally posted by longshanks31

it was gaelic here i think, after many waves of people coming here, its divided into three forms, welsh, scotch gaelic and the almost extinct cornish gaelic.
In the scheme of things english as we know it is quite modern.
 
No such thing as 'Cornish Gaelic' Cornish is a Brythonic 'p' Celtic language very similar to Welsh and Breton..  Gaelic is a 'q' Celtic language originally spoken in Ireland and related to the Celti Iberian 'q' Celtic.
 
Earliest known language of mainland UK was an early form of Welsh, which depending on which theory you believe was very similar to Gaulish. 
 
 
cheers patch, you dont know if cornish is still spoken atall do you
 
Cornish went extint in the 19th century but has recently been resurected.  Not sure how accurate the resurection is though. 
 
Back to Top
Patch View Drop Down
Samurai
Samurai
Avatar

Joined: 19-Apr-2006
Location: England
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 119
  Quote Patch Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Nov-2007 at 23:34
Originally posted by pinguin

Hey, and what place names in Britain are in Brythonic, Celt Iberian, Welsh et al?
 
That would be nice to know
 
I used to have a book giving the placename origins of most UK settlements, unfortuneatley I lost it when moving.  I grew up in a village which in Gaelic means "field of the boggle".
 
For an idea below is a wiki link that gives some oringins of UK place names -
 
Back to Top
pekau View Drop Down
Caliph
Caliph
Avatar
Atlantean Prophet

Joined: 08-Oct-2006
Location: Korea, South
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 3335
  Quote pekau Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2007 at 00:36
Grunts and sign languages.
     
   
Join us.
Back to Top
andrew View Drop Down
Earl
Earl


Joined: 31-May-2007
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 253
  Quote andrew Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2007 at 01:43
LOL, everyone's having difficulty as for me this is easy.
 
Demotic. :)
Back to Top
Tar Szernd View Drop Down
Consul
Consul


Joined: 28-Aug-2006
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 384
  Quote Tar Szernd Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2007 at 07:56
Originally posted by Temujin

Originally posted by pinguin

 
Are there where you live names that people don't know the meaning in German? That would be interesting to find out.


can't think of any at the moment...
 
Maybe some village names by the sorbs?
(In most of the german heimatdokumentary :-)films I've seen was mentioned the - f.e. old frank or saxon etc- origin of the village/town name ,but I can't remember:-).


Edited by Tar Szernd - 20-Nov-2007 at 07:56
Back to Top
longshanks31 View Drop Down
Colonel
Colonel
Avatar

Joined: 03-Jul-2007
Location: Great Britain
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 572
  Quote longshanks31 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2007 at 10:29
pinguin, its only my estimate but id guess there are thousands of place names with a gaelic influence, from top to toe of the country, i say that because most place names in britain do not actually seem to mean or descibe anything in english, the romans, vikings danes and normans all have there influences with place names ie newcastle means something in english, but leicester the city i grew up in means nothing in english, many place names have a connection to the rivers that run through them, ie avonmouth or stoke on trent, after the avon and trent rivers that run through them, but the twist is, who named the rivers, if the river names are celtic in origin by and large then there influence is even greater.
English as we know it is quite a young language, the normans landed in 1066 and there influence on the native tongue would have been profound, its very likely due to the age of british settlements that place names that are 100 percent english language in origin are infact a minority.
I could be wrong, its just what ive found from skimming through my road atlas,
long live the king of bhutan
Back to Top
Roberts View Drop Down
Chieftain
Chieftain

aka axeman

Joined: 22-Aug-2005
Location: Riga
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 1138
  Quote Roberts Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2007 at 12:51
Finnic - Livonian,  Baltic - Selonian, Letthigallian, Semigallian, Curonian.
Back to Top
Temujin View Drop Down
King
King
Avatar
Sirdar Bahadur

Joined: 02-Aug-2004
Location: Eurasia
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 5221
  Quote Temujin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2007 at 18:38
Originally posted by Tar Szernd

 
Maybe some village names by the sorbs?
(In most of the german heimatdokumentary :-)films I've seen was mentioned the - f.e. old frank or saxon etc- origin of the village/town name ,but I can't remember:-).


well Sorbs live in the east, i live in the south. but you are correct, the name of villages here give away when they were founded and by whom...

coming back to the Sorbs, many place names in eastern Germany are actually Slavic, like Leipzig and Chemnitz for example.


Edited by Temujin - 20-Nov-2007 at 18:38
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest
Guest
  Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08-Dec-2007 at 01:16

This may sound strange to Spaniards but, after thinking it a little bit, and seeing the evidence, I have the idea that the original language of the ancient Iberians was something very close to Basque!

I hope that idea don't produce a violent attack on me LOL
 
These are basic Basque phrases. If you find very strange, perhaps the reason is that, unlike Spanish that comes from Latin, Basque IS NOT an Indoeuropean language.
 
  • Bai = Yes
  • Ez = No
  • Kaixo! = Hello
  • Agur!, Aio! = Goodbye!
  • Ikusi arte = See you!
  • Eskerrik asko! = Thank you!
  • Egun on = Good morning (literally: Good day)
  • Egun on, bai = Standard reply to Egun on
  • Arratsalde on = Good evening
  • Gabon = Good night
  • Mesedez = Please
  • Barkatu = Excuse (me)
  • Aizu! = Listen! (To get someone's attention, not very polite, to be used with friends)
  •  
    Back to Top
    longshanks31 View Drop Down
    Colonel
    Colonel
    Avatar

    Joined: 03-Jul-2007
    Location: Great Britain
    Online Status: Offline
    Posts: 572
      Quote longshanks31 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09-Dec-2007 at 00:41
    well the basque were very powerfull in there time, that would be profound upon the iberian languages.
    long live the king of bhutan
    Back to Top
    Guests View Drop Down
    Guest
    Guest
      Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09-Dec-2007 at 04:23

    Yeap. That's a very interesting fact.

    It is amazing how much Spanish language is associated with the culture of Spain when, in fact, Spanish is nothing less than a popular variation of Latin, carried to Spain by the poor soldier and other uneducated people.
     
    The native languages of Spain become extinct, but it is tragical and ironical that perhaps the closest language to the Iberian natives of Spain is Basque...
     
    That could come as a shock for most Spaniards. For Latinos it just sounds funny. ( To get the feeling, a similar situation for a British could be to realize that the original language of England was Welsh or Irish Confused... that would be a shock)
     
     
     


    Edited by pinguin - 09-Dec-2007 at 04:26
    Back to Top
    medenaywe View Drop Down
    AE Moderator
    AE Moderator
    Avatar
    Master of Meanings

    Joined: 06-Nov-2010
    Location: /
    Online Status: Offline
    Posts: 14627
      Quote medenaywe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06-Feb-2015 at 04:21
    Original is one,we all around the world are speaking it's compounds!Big smile
    Back to Top
     Post Reply Post Reply Page  <12

    Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

    Bulletin Board Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 9.56a [Free Express Edition]
    Copyright ©2001-2009 Web Wiz

    This page was generated in 0.109 seconds.