Notice: This is the official website of the All Empires History Community (Reg. 10 Feb 2002)

  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Register Register  Login Login

The Knights Templar

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <12
Author
Dawn View Drop Down
Suspended
Suspended

Suspended

Joined: 02-Aug-2004
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 3148
  Quote Dawn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: The Knights Templar
    Posted: 28-Aug-2004 at 10:54

Cistercian Abbott, Bernard of Clairvaux was the fellow I was thinking of. Heres a little bit about him:

"Bernard of Clairvaux, Saint (1090-1153), born near Martiney, the village where Hugues De Payen was the Leige Lord holding his title from Bernards Uncle, the Count of Champagne. In 1113 he became a monk and joins the Order, with 20 of his family and friends, in the Cistercian monastery of Cteaux, a small village south of Dijon, and in 1115 he became abbot of a monastery at Clairvaux, north of Dijon. Under his rule the monastery at Clairvaux became the most prominent of the Cistercian order. Reputed miracles and the eloquent preaching of Bernard attracted numerous pilgrims. Bernard becomes the patron and writes the code of the Templar Order In Praise of the New Knighthood. Between 1130 and 1153, more than 90 monasteries were founded under the auspices of the one at Clairvaux, and Bernard's influence in the church spread throughout the world"

Back to Top
Jagatai Khan View Drop Down
Chieftain
Chieftain
Avatar
Jeune Turc

Joined: 07-Aug-2004
Location: Turkey
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 1270
  Quote Jagatai Khan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Sep-2004 at 07:12

Hey a nice picture about Templars

If you play Aok,You can find a campaign named "The Revenge Of templars" in HeavenGames.I played it and I gave a 4.8 grade and my four hours.



Edited by Jagatai Khan
Back to Top
Landsknecht_Doppelsoldner View Drop Down
Colonel
Colonel
Avatar

Joined: 25-Aug-2004
Location: United States
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 557
  Quote Landsknecht_Doppelsoldner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15-Sep-2004 at 22:17

Originally posted by Roughneck

The Ottomans were still a threat to Europe after Malta, as shown by two sieges of Vienna in the 1600s, the last of them in 1683.

 

There was only one siege of Vienna in the 1600s--the one that took place in 1683.

The first siege was in 1529, some 36 years before the failed attempt on Malta.  This first siege doesn't get nearly as much attention as the 1683 one, but in many ways it was the more remarkable of the two.  Veteran landsknechte and Spanish troops from Italy put up a terrific defense of the then poorly-fortified town.  They even lauched several large and successful sorties against the Ottomans.  Turkish mines were skilfully counter-mined.  Breaches were tenaciously defended.  Vienna held out until winter, and the Ottomans were forced to abandon the siege.

Sulleyman tried again in 1532, but turned away after encountering the huge field army assembled by Charles V.

 



Edited by Landsknecht_Doppelsoldner
"Who despises me and my praiseworthy craft,

I'll hit on the head that it resounds in his heart."


--Augustin Staidt, of the Federfechter (German fencing guild)
Back to Top
Evildoer View Drop Down
Baron
Baron


Joined: 25-Aug-2004
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 434
  Quote Evildoer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Sep-2004 at 21:56
The Ottomans devestated the countryside as they retreated. A band of German knights witnessed this and got so mad that they chased them, routing and massacring whole bands of them.
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest
Guest
  Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Jan-2005 at 11:44
According to Dan Brown's somewhat suspect claims in the "Da Vinci Code". In Jerusalem the Templars discovered the "truth" about Jesus and upon their return to Christendom they proceeded to blackmail the pope with this "truth" which could shatter the foundations of the papacy. The pope paid them of with title and immense power and influence but eventually the Papacy decided that they had to go and with the King of France's help they rounded up the order hoping to destroy their "truth". Though of course the "truth" survived and the search for it became the centre of the Da Vinci Code

Edited by Vercingetorix
Back to Top
vagabond View Drop Down
Colonel
Colonel
Avatar

Joined: 07-Aug-2004
Location: United States
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 524
  Quote vagabond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Jan-2005 at 04:05

Please keep in mind that nothing Dan Brown says in "The Da Vinci Code" can be taken as anything but complete fiction.  He has based his story on the worst that pseudo history has to offer  - rumors, myths and legends that have been kicked around for hundreds of years without any documentation or authentication - repetition alone has kept these stories alive.  (I don't know about anyone else - but I am dubious of anything that will pass only the the examination of "It's been repeated often enough, it must be true!"  - and will pass no other scrutiny at all. )

I don't, as many do, object to Brown's book on any religious grounds.  I don't even really understand how any faith could be challenged by such a collection of misstatements.  Any religion worth it's salt should be able to tolerate a bit of questioning.  My objections to his book are that it is intellectually insulting - a combination of poor research, pseudo and outright bad history, and poor writing style.

All of the material used by Brown has been hashed and rehashed many times in recent years.  The consipracy theories that he used were even used   to some extent by Umberto Eco (a real author, historian and good writer of historical fiction).  Much of Brown's premise comes from works like Lincoln, Leigh and Baigent's "Holy Blood, Holy Grail" and other similar fringe historical surveys.  Brown is not a historian by any stretch of the imagination, and his claims to historical accuracy have all been thoroughly shot down - with a few exceptions: 

  • There were once Knights Templar
  • Paris is a city in France
  • London is a city in England

Outside of the above - take everything he says with a grain of salt.  That's why they call it fiction - just like the Fairy Tales of Brother's Grimm, Gulliver's Travels and  the Arabian Nights - someone made it all up.  All of the above recite tales long told by others.  At least the authors of the three works mentioned above didn't claim, as Brown did,  that there was anything original included in their stories.  Or anything true.

In the time of your life, live - so that in that wonderous time you shall not add to the misery and sorrow of the world, but shall smile to the infinite delight and mystery of it. (Saroyan)
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <12

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Bulletin Board Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 9.56a [Free Express Edition]
Copyright ©2001-2009 Web Wiz

This page was generated in 0.125 seconds.