Notice: This is the official website of the All Empires History Community (Reg. 10 Feb 2002)

  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Register Register  Login Login

Abyaneh, an entrance to the Parthian history!

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Cyrus Shahmiri View Drop Down
Administrator
Administrator
Avatar
King of Kings

Joined: 07-Aug-2004
Location: Iran
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 6217
  Quote Cyrus Shahmiri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Abyaneh, an entrance to the Parthian history!
    Posted: 06-Dec-2004 at 07:39

 I read here that Abyaneh is called an entrance to the Iranian history but I think it is better to call this village an entrance to the Parthian history beucase everthing (architectural style, costume, language, ...) is Parthian.

http://www.iccim.org/english/Magazine/iran_commerce/no23_200 0/21.htm

In order to reach the ancient village, one should take a small route off the kilometer 54 of the Kashan-Natanz road. Arriving at the village, one will wonder as to how such an ancient place has remained so incredibly intact ever since the Sassanid era, while the rest of the country has constantly been under one kind of uprising or another.
The houses of Abyaneh bear an ancient architectural style, featured by the use of clay as the construction material and latticed windows and wooden doors.
Walking through the streets of Abyaneh, one can see men and women, young and old, in traditional costumes. It seems modern life has created no changes in their clothes and they still prefer their traditional garments.

 

http://www.irantour.org/Iran/city/ABYANEH.html

The village is compact, with narrow and sloped lanes, and houses located on the slope as if placed on a stairway. Here, the roofs of some houses are used to serve as the courtyard for other houses higher up on the slope. The language spoken by the literate people of Abyaneh is Parthian Pahlavi. They are deeply committed to honoring their traditions.

Back to Top
YusakuJon3 View Drop Down
Shogun
Shogun
Avatar

Joined: 04-Aug-2004
Location: United States
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 223
  Quote YusakuJon3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08-Dec-2004 at 19:44
A beautiful place, in its own way resembling some of the old cities of Europe.  Being out here in the United States, I can only envision some old farmhouses and mansions outside of the general sprawl of the suburbs as having these qualities.  Even the oldest buildings of most of the towns and cities near my home are systematically being replaced by modern structures.

One thing that I've been curious about is whether or not building materials have changed much since ancient times.   I guess I shouldn't be surprised, as the Iranian plateau and surrounding deserts, mountains and steppelands have little or no timber.  It would still be practical to use timber sparingly and go with brickwork for most of the building material.  That might also be an advantage, given the serverity of the summertime heats in that region that I've been reading about (the closest comparable climate on American soil is in the southwestern deserts in New Mexico, Arizona and southern California).
"There you go again!"

-- President Ronald W. Reagan (directed towards reporters at a White House press conference, mid-1980s)
Back to Top
Cyrus Shahmiri View Drop Down
Administrator
Administrator
Avatar
King of Kings

Joined: 07-Aug-2004
Location: Iran
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 6217
  Quote Cyrus Shahmiri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09-Dec-2004 at 04:18

I think not only in Iran but all other countries building materials strongly relate to its environment, these are two ancient villages in Iran similar to Abyaneh but with the different type of buildings:

Masuleh

http://www.iccim.org/English/Magazine/iran_commerce/no3_1999 /13.htm

Materials used in the construction of Masuleh's houses are dried brick, rubble, wooden lumbers and fern which insulates the house against leakage of water.
A layer of dried leaves of fern is applied between the mud and wood timbers in the ceiling to insulate against the leakage of water into the house. Each year the Masuleh residents refurbish their walls with yellow mud and the ceiling with sediments collected from beaches of the Masuleh Rudkhan River.

and

Kandovan:

Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Bulletin Board Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 9.56a [Free Express Edition]
Copyright ©2001-2009 Web Wiz

This page was generated in 0.219 seconds.