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Turkish words in your language

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Alparslan1071 View Drop Down
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  Quote Alparslan1071 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Turkish words in your language
    Posted: 21-Jun-2006 at 06:09
    Dear Friends ,

I want to find turkish words in old Ottoman Empire land citizens.I met with my greek customers and we werespeaking in english.but of course they were speaking greek each other.I caugth lots of turkish words in their greek words.
Sokagi=Sokak=Street
Kalupi=Kalıp=Mould

Also I met a syrian customer he was armenian and his origin from Antep(Ayntap)and he was speaking in Turkish with Antep dialect.

I am from Adana and we say the little childs "bizdik" it was armenian and means "small child "in armenian.

Please send the turkish word in your language

Serbs,Croats,Bosnians,greeks,Armenians,Georgians,Bulgarians,Arabs al perople from the world.

Waiting for your replies.

Ozan


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xristar View Drop Down
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  Quote xristar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Jun-2006 at 06:33
Kalderimi in greek is the road with cobble stones.
Objects like kazani, doulapi, bairaki,
Curses like tsoglani, 'ai sihtir' (phrase), haivani, boudalas, feleki (is it turkish?)
Boulouki is a bunch of people
Yavri is used to call (by my mum at least) a little child (it means young bird I think), it's often used as one word Yavrum=my yavri
In older texts (19th cent) there are words like askeri (army), zaires (provisions, I guess), tabouri (still used, means a fortified, sort of, position), derveni is the mountain or the mountain passage
Toufeki is the rifle. I don't know if you use it in turkish. It's persian however. Yatagani is a weird curved sword very common until the 19th cent, hatzari is the scimitar,
Kourkouti perhaps is turkish, tzieri is the liver
 
Many foods, like Imam Baildi, kouskousi, (tziero)sarmas,  sweets like Baklavas, Kazan Dipi, Taou Kioktsou (I think it sounds that way)
 

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  Quote DayI Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Jun-2006 at 07:20
we had a thread about in cultural forum (i think linguistal part of it). 
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  Quote Alparslan1071 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Jun-2006 at 08:17
Dear Xristar,

Feleki is correct.turkish.Yavri=yavru is like son or daugther.yavrukus=small bird.

Tabouri=Tabur ;a big group of soldier
Tuefeki we use in turkish.

Touk Kiotsku =Tavuk gogsu Chicken Chest



I am really happy to hear those words from you.

Also we use lots of greek words in Turkish.

All Fish kinds.

Kefal,Barbunya,Uskumru,Kolyos,Torik,iskorpit,Trakonya
istavrit,mezgit

Because our roots from central asia and we do not know what is sea :)

We took all the fishing words from greek also.

Iskarmoz,Usturmaca,Lumboz,Pruva (i think this is from italians)Pupa,Aganta burina burinata,

istavroz,Ayazma,Kilise,Efendi(a greek friend told me that it is coming from Atfendios or something?)
Papas,Yortu,

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  Quote xristar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Jun-2006 at 12:15
Efendi comes from Afthendis, which means master, overlord
It seems tabouri has changed meaning in greek than in turkish. I have met it with a similar meaning of yours, but generally in greek its used as I said. It has also verb forms, tabouronomai= fortify myself.
I recognized some fish names, but to be honest, I myself don't know the names of many fish.
 

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  Quote bg_turk Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Jun-2006 at 07:34
There are tons in Bulgarian, especially in the colloquial form. I love to annoy Bulgarians by pointing out some of the words they use are Turkish Evil Smile

Some examples:

Adjeb - Whether
djam - glas
kofte - meatball
dyushek - matrice
shkembe - stomach
yorgan - cover


I cannot think of any more ... I usually discover them during conversations.
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  Quote Giannis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Jun-2006 at 08:11

In Greece we also use djam, kofte and shkembe. In Thessaloniki we also use the word kardasi for brother.

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  Quote Akolouthos Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Jun-2006 at 08:16
Does anyone know whether or not any Turkish words made it into the English language, or influenced pre-existing English words?
 
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  Quote Giannis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Jun-2006 at 08:26

I can think only of one ''bazaar'', but I can't say for sure if it's of turkish or arabic origin.

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  Quote bg_turk Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Jun-2006 at 08:32
Originally posted by Akolouthos

Does anyone know whether or not any Turkish words made it into the English language, or influenced pre-existing English words?

The only Turkish word in English I am aware of is Yoghurt. (yogurt in Turkish)
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  Quote Cyrus Shahmiri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Jun-2006 at 09:14

Just open the "GH" sections of a Persian dictionary!

Ghaan: King
Ghab: Plate, Dish
Ghablama: Steam-tight
Ghabturghay: Small chest
Ghabugh: Skin
Ghaen: Brother of husband
... hundreds other words!

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  Quote DayI Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Jun-2006 at 10:36
Toke this from TDK site a long time ago:

HANG DLDE NE KADAR TRKE SZCK VAR


Akaln, yaz dilimizdeki yaklak 400 alntya karlk Yunanca'ya yaklak 3 bin Trke kkenli sz verildiini vurgulayarak, ''Macarca'dan aldmz 18 sze karlk bu dilde yaklak 2 bin Trke alnt var. Trkiye Trkesi'nde Rusa alnt 38 iken, Rusa'daki Trke alntlar yaklak 2500'dr. Btn bunlar Trke'nin komu uluslar ve kltrleri byk lde etkilediini gsteriyor'' diye konutu.


Akaln, ince'de 307, Farsa'da yaklak 3 bin, Urduca'da 227, Arapa'da yaklak 2 bin, Ukraynaca'da 747, Ermenice'de 4 bin 262, Fince'de 118, Rumence'de yaklak 3 bin, Bulgarca'da yaklak 3 bin 500, Srpa'da 8 bin 742, eke'de 248, talyanca'da 146, Arnavuta'da yaklak 3 bin, ngilizce'de 470, Almanca'da 166 Trke kkenli szck olduu ortaya konulduunu anlatt.


Akann, ''Listeden anlalaca gibi, bir szcmzn birka dile getiini gz nne aldmzda dnya dillerindeki Trke kkenli szcklerin saysnn 35-40 bin civarnda olduu grlr'' dedi.


quick translation:

How many Turkish words are in wich language:

Weve loaned from Greek around 400 words but we gave them almost 3000 words, so is with hungarian, weve loaned 18 hungarian words but we gave them almost 2 000 Turkish words, in Turkey's Turkish there are 38 Russian words borrowed but we gave them almost 2500 words.

Also there are in Chinese 307, Persian almost 3 000, Urdu 227, Arabic almost 2 000, ukranian 747, armenian 4 262, finnish 118, Romanian almost 3 000, Bulgarian almost 3 500, serbian 8 742, czech 248, italian 146, Albanian almost 3 000, English 470 and in German 166 words loaned from Turkish.

As you see Serbian and Armenian languages have the most loaned words from Turkish, but serbian suprises me over there...


edit: Yiannis you confused me LOL but thanks for the tip (loaned)


Edited by DayI - 22-Jun-2006 at 10:57
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  Quote Yiannis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Jun-2006 at 10:48
Originally posted by DayI

  Weve borrowed from Greek around 400 words but we gave them almost 3000 words, so is with hungarian, weve borrowed 18 hungarian words but we gave them almost 2 000 Turkish words, in Turkey's Turkish there are 38 Russian words borrowed but we gave them almost 2500 words.
 
Interesting, you're giving words to others but you're just borrowing from them Tongue 
 
When it comes to Greek, I suppose you don't include the loans from other languages, that are actually Greek? Especially technical or scientific terms, like most of the -ology words, words like cinema, theatre, comedy, airplane etc... seems an aufull more that 400 to me.
 
I just realize that TDK was the comitee formed by Ataturk to "purify" the Turkish language from the Persian and Arabic elements in 1923, interesting I didn't know that!
 
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  Quote Mortaza Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Jun-2006 at 11:00

When it comes to Greek, I suppose you don't include the loans from other languages, that are actually Greek? Especially technical or scientific terms, like most of the -ology words, words like cinema, theatre, comedy, airplane etc... seems an aufull more that 400 to me.

Most  probably that words were accepted as  english or french.
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  Quote DayI Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Jun-2006 at 11:05
Originally posted by Yiannis

Originally posted by DayI

  Weve borrowed from Greek around 400 words but we gave them almost 3000 words, so is with hungarian, weve borrowed 18 hungarian words but we gave them almost 2 000 Turkish words, in Turkey's Turkish there are 38 Russian words borrowed but we gave them almost 2500 words.
 
Interesting, you're giving words to others but you're just borrowing from them Tongue 
 
When it comes to Greek, I suppose you don't include the loans from other languages, that are actually Greek? Especially technical or scientific terms, like most of the -ology words, words like cinema, theatre, comedy, airplane etc... seems an aufull more that 400 to me.
 
I just realize that TDK was the comitee formed by Ataturk to "purify" the Turkish language from the Persian and Arabic elements in 1923, interesting I didn't know that!
 
TDK whasnt formed for "purify" the Turkish language, it whas formed for finding, using the existing Turkish word for another loaned word (mostly arabic i think).

Here are the list of how many words we loaned from other languages:

german 99, arabic 6455,
albanian 1, bulgarian 8, 
armenian 16, persian 1361,
french 4702, hebrew 8,
english 470, spanish 18,
mongolian 15, norwegian 1,
ottoman turkish 43, portugese 3,
russian 37, slavic 21,
greek 382

totally 14.394 foreign words


I got those mailed a while ago, dunno from wich sources they are but these are the numbers.
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  Quote SearchAndDestroy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Jun-2006 at 11:10
Originally posted by Giannis

I can think only of one ''bazaar'', but I can't say for sure if it's of turkish or arabic origin.

I looked it up at dictionary.com and it says that it has Persian and Indo-European origins. I don't know how reliable the site is though, but I'm guessing thats it.
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  Quote xristar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Jun-2006 at 13:12
The word 'horde', very common in many western languages has turco mongolic origin. Original form was 'ordu' (I think). It means 'army', but in the western languages it has gotten a meaning of a ruthless barbaric massive army. (In games you'll not hear about 'armies of darkness', or 'evil armies'. You'll find hordes)
In Greek, in texts of the revolution (1821) it's commonly used with the normal meaning of the army.
 
To the turks: perhaps there are not many uniquely Greek words in the turkish language, but there are many universal Greek words.
'Limani' is I think a Greek word used only in Greek and also used in Turkish. I'm not sure though

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  Quote bleda Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Jun-2006 at 13:24
liman from greek word
bacanak i think used by turkey and greece
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  Quote bg_turk Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Jun-2006 at 13:34
badjanak is also used in Bulgarian
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  Quote DayI Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Jun-2006 at 14:40
check this thread:
http://www.allempires.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=10656&PN=2
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