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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Today in Womens History
    Posted: 16-Mar-2012 at 15:29
March 16th
1833 - Susan Hayhurst becomes 1st US woman grad of a pharmacy college
1876 - Nelly Saunders & Rose Harland fight 1st female boxing match (NY)
1912 - Mrs William Howard Taft plants 1st cherry tree in Wash DC
1939 - Marriage of Princess Fawzia of Egypt to Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi of Iran.
1991 - Worlds Ladies Figure Skating Champ in Munich won by Kristi Yamaguchi

1750 - Caroline Hershel, an opera singer, astronomer and mathematician, born in Hanover, Germany. Daughter of the court musician and amateur astronomer Isaac Hershel, she received a very rich education well beyond the usual female fare for the time - she studies music in England, and mathematics and astronomy at home under her brother, William Hershel.
"...In England Caroline Herschel began assisting William with his astronomical work, while she trained to become a professional singer, and began to appear as a soloist. ...Her brother William discovered the planet Uranus, and credited Caroline for her help in this discovery. After this discovery, King George III appointed William as court astronomer, with a paid stipend. Caroline Herschel abandoned her singing career for astronomy. She helped her brother with calculations and paperwork, and also made her own observations.

Caroline Herschel discovered new nebulae in 1783: Andromeda and Cetus and later that year, 14 more nebulae. With a new telescope, a gift from her brother, she then discovered a comet, making her the first woman known to have done so. She went on to discover seven more comets. King George III heard of her discoveries and added a stipend of 50 pounds annually, paid to Caroline. She thus became the first woman in England with a paid government appointment.She later published her own work cataloguing stars and nebulae. She indexed and organized a catalogue by John Flamsteed, and she worked with John Herschel, William's son, to publish a catalog of nebulae....

After Willliam's death in 1822, Caroline had to return to Germany, where she continued writing. She was recognized for her contributions by the King of Prussia when she was 96, and Caroline Herschel died at 97.Caroline Herschel was, along with Mary Somerville, appointed to honorary membership in the Royal Society in 1835, the first women to be so honored...." http://womenshistory.about.com/od/scienceastronomy/p/herschel.htm

picture of newton

1876 - Anna Atkins, a English botanist, daughter of John George Children, scientist (the Children's Python of Australia is named for him) born.

"...Anna Atkins was educated in science by her scientist father. She married in 1825 and took up an interest in plant collecting and botany. In 1839, she became a member of the Botanical Society in London.Her father and husband were both friends of William Fox Talbot, who was inventing methods of taking photographs, including one known as the blue print process. Anna Atkins took her first picture about 1841; whether she or Talbot's wife Constance took the first photograph by a woman is debated.

Anna Atkins used her knowledge and skill in photography to publish a book on algae in Britain, using photographs to illustrate it. She published two more volumes of photographs of algae.Anna Atkins went on to publish several other books illustrated with photographs, working with Anne Dixon, a friend and cousin of Jane Austen. She also published some other books including a memoir of her father and several books on fashion. The British Museum featured her plant collection in 1865. She died in 1871...."http://womenshistory.about.com/od/photographers/p/Anna-Atkins.htm

She is considered to be the first person who published a book illustrated with photographs. Here one of her photos

A cyanotype photogram made by Atkins which was part of her 1843 book, Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions
File:Anna Atkins 1861.jpg

1864 - Carrie Bamberg Frank Fuld, an American philanthropist from Jewish descend, born in Baltimore, Maryland, in a family of emigrants from Bavaria, who created the " L. Bamberger and Company" in Newark, New Jersey - a successful store, similar to size and reach to other Jewish-American trading companies. Together with her brother:

"...department store magnate Louis Bamberger, founded the internationally acclaimed Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. The institute became an important center for scholarship and counted among its first professors Albert Einstein and other refugees from Hitler’s Germany. In a quiet and effective manner, Fuld worked with Abraham Flexner, founding director of the institute, to help craft an institution that would become a model for scholarly endeavor, largely unfettered by worldly concerns. They hoped to create a forum for the kind of disinterested scholarship that was almost absent from American higher education in 1930 and that was about to disappear completely from Germany, where Flexner looked for the model of this tradition. In their lengthy correspondence about the nature of this new institution, Fuld and Flexner explored the possibilities of scholarship in a world that was coming apart. In her concern for the success of her most active philanthropic endeavor, Fuld involved herself in the well-being of the permanent members of the institute....

...While Felix Fuld was alive (he died on January 20, 1929), the family philanthropies had a decidedly community-oriented and Jewish thrust, investing in such institutions as the Newark Beth Israel Hospital and the YM-YWHA. Carrie Fuld associated herself closely with the Jewish Day Nursery and with Neighborhood House, which catered to the needs of Russian Jewish immigrants. The Fulds were members of Newark’s B’nai Jeshurun Reform Congregation, the oldest synagogue in the state of New Jersey. She belonged to the local chapter of Hadassah and was a member of the board of directors of the National Council of Jewish Women from 1930 to 1935.

After Felix Fuld’s death, Louis Bamberger decided in 1929 to sell the family business to R. H. Macy so that he and his sister could devote themselves to philanthropy. Louis and Carrie were intent upon founding a Jewish medical college in the Newark area, but Abraham Flexner helped change their minds, planting the seed that created the Institute for Advanced Study within a few months of the sale of Bamberger’s. Originally planned to be housed on the Bamberger-Fuld estate as a last great gift to the Newark community, Flexner convinced the brother and sister that the institute, for which they provided an initial endowment of $5 million and made subsequent large gifts throughout the rest of their days, needed to be near a great university and library. Carrie Bamberger Frank Fuld made the institute the chief occupation of her last years. She died in Lake Placid, New York, on July 18, 1944...." http://jwa.org/encyclopedia/article/fuld-carrie-bamberger-frank

Fuld, Carrie - still image [media]




Edited by Don Quixote - 16-Mar-2012 at 16:11
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Mar-2012 at 22:54
March 17th:
1870 - Mass legislature authorizes incorporation of Wellesley Female Seminary
1917 - 1st exclusively women's bowling tournament begins in St Louis
1918 - US Ladies Figure Skating championship won by Rosemary Beresford
1921 - Dr Marie Stopes opens Britain's 1st birth control clinic (London)
1931 - Stalin throws Krupskaya Lenin out of Central Committee
1969 - Golda Meir becomes Israel's 4th PM
1973 - Queen Elizabeth II opens new London Bridge

1789 - Abigail Filmore, the First of First Ladies to hold a job after marriage, born in Saratoga County, NY.
"... Her father, a locally prominent Baptist preacher named Lemuel Powers, died shortly thereafter. Courageously, her mother moved on westward, thinking her scanty funds would go further in a less settled region, and ably educated her small son and daughter beyond the usual frontier level with the help of her husband's library. Shared eagerness for schooling formed a bond when Abigail Powers at 21 met Millard Fillmore at 19, both students at a recently opened academy in the village of New Hope. Although she soon became young Fillmore's inspiration, his struggle to make his way as a lawyer was so long and ill paid that they were not married until February 1826. She even resumed teaching school after the marriage. And then her only son, Millard Powers, was born in 1828.

Attaining prosperity at last, Fillmore bought his family a six-room house in Buffalo, where little Mary Abigail was born in 1832. Enjoying comparative luxury, Abigail learned the ways of society as the wife of a Congressman. She cultivated a noted flower garden; but much of her time, as always, she spent reading. In 1847, Fillmore was elected state comptroller; with the children away in boarding school and college, the parents moved temporarily to Albany.

In 1849, Abigail Fillmore came to Washington as wife of the Vice President; 16 months later, after Zachary Taylor's death at a height of sectional crisis, the Fillmores moved into the White House.Even after the period of official mourning the social life of the Fillmore administration remained subdued. The First Lady presided with grace at state dinners and receptions; but a permanently injured ankle made her Friday-evening levees an ordeal--two hours of standing at her husband's side to greet the public. In any case, she preferred reading or music in private. Pleading her delicate health, she entrusted many routine social duties to her attractive daughter, "Abby." With a special appropriation from Congress, she spent contented hours selecting books for a White House library and arranging them in the oval room upstairs, where Abby had her piano, harp, and guitar. ..." http://womenshistory.about.com/gi/o.htm?zi=1/XJ&zTi=1&sdn=womenshistory&cdn=education&tm=14&f=22&tt=2&bt=1&bts=1&zu=http%3A//clinton4.nara.gov/textonly/WH/glimpse/firstladies/html/af13.html

http://www.picturehistory.com/images/products/3/2/4/prod_32454.jpg

1841 - Emily Sartain, an American artist, born in Philadelphia.

"...Emily Sartain (1841-1927) was the first woman to practice the art of the mezzotint and the only woman to win a gold medal at the 1876 World Fair in Philadelphia. She was the daughter of Philadelphia master printer and publisher of Sartain's Magazine John Sartain. [1]

In 1886 she became the principal of the Philadelphia School of Design for Women, now Moore College of Art & Design. [1] She continued in the role for 33 years (1886-1919). As principal at the Philadelphia School of Design for Women she achieved national recognition in the new field of professional art education. Today, Moore offers both a BFA and MA in Art Education. She was also responsible for introducing important faculty members such as Robert Henri, Samuel Murray and Daniel Gerber. [2]

A portrait painter and engraver, Emily Sartain studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and later traveled with friend Mary Cassatt to study painting in Europe. It was at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts that she met and was romantically linked to Thomas Eakins, who remained a lifelong friend.[1]In 1897, Emily Sartain was a founding member of the Plastic Club in Philadelphia. [1]..."http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emily_Sartain

Here one of her pictures

http://iamachild.files.wordpress.com/2011/06/portrait-of-a-young-girl.jpg

And a portrait of her, by Thomas Eakins:

http://hoocher.com/Thomas_Eakins/Miss_Emily_Sartain_(Study)_ca_1890_95.jpg


1846 - Kate Greenway, an English writer and illustrator on children's books, born.
"...Greenaway spent much of her childhood at Rolleston, Nottinghamshire.[1] She studied at what is now the Royal College of Art in London, which at that time had a separate section for women, and was headed by Richard Burchett. Her first book, Under the Window (1879), a collection of simple, perfectly idyllic verses about children, was a bestseller.

Greenaway's paintings were reproduced by chromoxylography, by which the colours were printed from hand-engraved wood blocks by the firm of Edmund Evans. Through the 1880s and 1890s, her only rivals in popularity in children's book illustration were Walter Crane and Randolph Caldecott."Kate Greenaway" children, all of them little girls and boys too young to be put in trousers, according to the conventions of the time, were dressed in her own versions of late eighteenth century and Regency fashions: smock-frocks and skeleton suits for boys, high-waisted pinafores and dresses with mobcaps and straw bonnets for girls. The influence of children's clothes in portraits by British painter John Hoppner (1758–1810) may have provided her some inspiration. Liberty of London adapted Kate Greenaway's drawings as designs for actual children's clothes. A full generation of mothers in the liberal-minded "artistic" British circles who called themselves "The Souls" and embraced the Arts and Crafts movement dressed their daughters in Kate Greenaway pantaloons and bonnets in the 1880s and 1890s.

Greenaway was elected to membership of the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours in 1889. She lived in an Arts and Crafts style house she commissioned from Richard Norman Shaw in Frognal, London, although she spent summers in Rolleston, near Southwell.Greenaway died of breast cancer in 1901 at the age of 55. She is buried in Hampstead Cemetery, London. The Kate Greenaway Medal, established in her honour in 1955, is awarded annually by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals in the UK to an illustrator of children's books...."http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kate_Greenaway

Here couple of examples of her work, which I find charming

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31591/31591-h/images/ill_046a.jpg

http://www.janeausten.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/4320108444_27b8ca7e37.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/69/Kate_Greenaway00.jpg

"...And Death Shall Have no Dominion..."   Dylan Thomas
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Mar-2012 at 01:16
March 18th:
1212: Claire of Assisi flees her family to avoid marriage, taking vows from Francis of Assisi (canonized 1255; feast day August 11)
1978 - Pakistani former premier Ali Bhutto sentenced to death

1840 - Marilla Marks Young Richer, an American lawyer and humanitarian, born.
"...Marilla Marks Ricker, lawyer, author and humanitarian, was born at New Durham, N.H., daughter of Jonathan B. and Hannah D. (Stevens) Young. Her father, a farmer and cousin of Brigham Young, was a broad liberal-minded man, and a "free thinker," and she was brought up a "free thinker," a suffragist and a Whig. After a course at Colby Academy, New London, N.H., she taught school until her marriage to John Ricker, of Dover, N.H., a well-to-do farmer, who died in 1868, leaving her a wealthy widow. She went abroad in 1872, spending some years in study in Germany, and thoroughly mastering the language of that country. She began the study of law, in Washington, D.C., with Albert G. Riddle and Arthur B. Williams, in 1876, and was admitted to the bar of the supreme court of the District of Columbia in 1882, taking the examination with eighteen men, all of whom she outranked. She practiced in Washington for many years and was known as the "prisoners’ friend," from her constant habit of visiting jails and prisons, and applying for releases and pardons, and supplying prisoners with reading matter, writing material and other comforts. Quite early in her legal career she made the test of the "poor convict’s act," under which she believed great injustice was done in the fines usually imposed supplementary to confinement, and she succeeded in receiving judgement that the fine was illegal. ...Her legal work has been almost invariably on the side of criminals, for whom she has the broadest charity, and for all oppressed, spending her means for them freely, and employing counsel when not able to attend the cases herself. In 1884 she was appointed examiner in chancery by the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia, and also U.S commissioner, in which capacity she heard many cases. She opened the New Hampshire bar to women in July 1890, when she was admitted to the bar of the state. She has written numerous letters on tariff, has done much political work on behalf of the Republican party. In 1891 she was admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court of the United States. She was the first woman in New Hampshire to demand the right to vote, paying her taxes under protest since refusal. ... She has served as vice-president-at-large of the National Legislative League, as president of the New Hampshire Woman Suffrage Association and is a life member of The Woman Suffrage Association. ... She is the author of several "free thought" books: "The Four Gospels," (1911); "I Don’t Know, Do You?" (1915); and "I Am Not Afraid, Are You?" (1917)....http://www.dover.lib.nh.us/doverhistory/marillamarksricker.htm


1853 - Myra Reynolds born. She wrote "The Learned Lady in England, 1670-1760" - a  book with biographies of English educated women, the full text is here http://www.archive.org/details/learnedladyineng00reynuoft

1865 - Anna Held,  Polish born  Broadway stage performer.
"...HELD, ANNA: French comedienne; born Sept. 19, 1880, in Paris; educated at Fontainebleau. Her début was made in "Miss Helyett" at the Folies Manguy, Paris, Sept. 19, 1895. Since then she has appeared in many plays, her most successful parts having been Mlle. Mars in Jean Richepin's "Mam'-selle Napoleon," and The Little Duchess in the comedy of that name, with which she made a starring tour of the United States in 1903. In 1902 she married Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr., of Chicago, Ill...." http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Jewish_Encyclopedia/Held,_Anna

From 1905 he had success in Broadway, which make her a millionaire.
"...Held spent the years of World War I working in vaudeville, and touring France, performing for French soldiers and raising money for the war effort. She came to be regarded as a war heroine for her contributions, and was highly regarded for the courage she displayed in travelling to the frontline to be where she could do the most good. She returned to the United States and starred in the film Madame le Presidente (1916)....."http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anna_Held
File:Anna Held 1902.jpg

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_tiBFDBu-eC8/SqpA2o4OcYI/AAAAAAAAAjA/2uIfBklwXkI/s400/26AnnaHeldVaudeville.jpg


Edited by Don Quixote - 19-Mar-2012 at 01:55
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Mar-2012 at 19:09
March 19th:
1950 - 5th US Women's Open Golf Championship won by Babe Didrikson-Zaharias
1988 - Yvonne van Gennip skates un-official world record 10 km (15:25.25)
1990 - 1st world ice hockey tournament for women held (Ottawa)

1850 - Alice French, an American novelist, born.
"....She was born at Andover, Massachusetts, a daughter of George Henry and Frances Wood French.[1] She graduated from Abbot Academy in Andover, in 1868.[2] She began her literary career about 1878 with studies of a social and economic bent, but soon turned to short stories, especially after her removal to Davenport, Iowa. Iowa and Arkansas gave her opportunities for exploiting regions hitherto little attempted in fiction. Her stories “The Bishop's Vagabond,” “The Hay of the Cyclone,” and “Whitsun Harp, Regulator” were popular. These, with other articles, initially appeared in the Atlantic Monthly and Scribner's Magazine. Later they appeared in her books.[2] Her novel Expiation (1890), won high praise...."
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d2/Alice_French_-_History_of_Iowa.jpg

1859 - Ellen Gates Starr, an American social reformer, born.
"...Ellen Starr was not born in Atlanta, Georgia but in fact Laona, Illinois. She was a student at the Rockford Female Seminary (1877–78), where she met Jane Addams... Starr taught for ten years in Chicago before joining Addams in 1888 for a tour of Europe. While in London, they were inspired by the success of the English Settlement movement and became determined to establish a similar social settlement in Chicago.

They returned to Chicago and co-founded Hull House as a kindergarten and then a day nursery, an infancy care centre, and a center for continuing education for adults. Starr was also active in the campaign to reform child labor laws and industrial working conditions in Chicago. She was a member of the Women's Trade Union League and helped organize striking garment workers in 1896, 1910, and 1915. However, by belief she was firmly anti-industrialisation, idealizing the guild system of the Middle Ages and later the Arts and Crafts Movement.[2] She taught such writers as Shakespeare, Dante and Robert Browning in the slums of Chicago to children who could not afford school education. She practiced her preachings about community labour to the extent of traveling to Britain to learn bookbinding....Although Starr possessed an interest in Roman Catholicism for many years, it was only when she believed the Church was seriously teaching social justice that she converted in 1920. Even after that, her work in campaigns against child labour met with much opposition from inside the Church[3]..."  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellen_Gates_Starr

EllenGStarr.jpg


1881 - Edith Nourse Rogers, an American social welfare polititician, and one of the first women to serve in the US Congress, born.

"...She was the first woman elected to congress from Massachusetts. Until 2012, she was the longest serving Congresswoman, now having been surpassed by Barbara Mikulski, and in her 35 years in the House of Representatives she was a powerful voice for veterans and sponsored seminal legislation, including the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944 (commonly known as the G.I. Bill), which provided educational and financial benefits for soldiers returning home from World War II, the 1942 bill that created the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC), and the 1943 bill that created the Women's Army Corps (WAC). She was also instrumental in bringing federal appropriations to her constituency, Massachusetts's 5th congressional district....

...Rogers was one of the first members of Congress to speak out against Adolf Hitler's treatment of Jews. The expulsion of Jews from Germany without proper papers caused a refugee crisis in 1938, and after the Evian Conference failed to lift immigration quotas in the 38 participating nations, Edith Rogers co-sponsored the Wagner-Rogers Bill with Senator Robert F. Wagner. Introduced to the Senate on February 9, 1939 and to the House on February 14, it would have allowed 20,000 German Jewish refugees under the age of 14 to settle in the United States.

The bill was supported by religious and labor groups, and the news media, but was strongly opposed by patriotic groups who believed "charity begins at home". After rancorous 1938 elections in the House and Senate, Congress had turned conservative, and despite provisions requiring the children to be supported by private individuals and agencies, not public funds, organizations like the American Legion, the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the American Coalition of Patriotic Societies lined up against it. With rising nativism and antisemitism, economic troubles, and Congress asserting its independence, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt was unable to support the bill, and it failed...."http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edith_Nourse_Rogers

http://www.poorwilliam.net/pix/rogers-edith3.jpg




Edited by Don Quixote - 29-Mar-2012 at 23:18
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Mar-2012 at 23:29
March 20th:
1985 - Libby Riddles is 1st woman to win Iditarod Trail Dog Sled Race

1825 - Cornelia Philips Spencer, an American writer during  the Civil War Era, born in  Harlen, New York
"...Her family moved to Chapel Hill in 1826 when her father, James Phillips, took a post as Professor of Mathematics at the University of North Carolina. Cornelia grew up in Chapel Hill and was educated in Latin, Greek, French, literature, music, drawing, and needlework. In 1851, at age twenty-six, Cornelia met twenty-two-year-old James Munroe Spencer, a law student. They married in 1855 and moved to Alabama, where their only child, Julia “June” James Spencer, was born in 1859.

In June 1861, James Spencer died after a long illness. Several months later, Cornelia yielded to her father's pleas to return to Chapel Hill. By then the Civil War was in progress, and she could scarcely maintain her occupation of tutoring young people.
During this period, Cornelia began collecting material for her first book, The Last Ninety Days of the War in North Carolina, a project suggested to her by Governor Zebulon Vance. She also wrote about the university and published a weekly 'Young Ladies' column in The North Carolina Presbyterian. ...

...She became a tireless advocate for the University of North Carolina. She published articles in the Raleigh Sentinel and urged members of the legislature to close the campus in 1870, when she feared the school would be a victim of Reconstruction politics.
After Reconstruction, her letters to editors and state leaders helped reopen the school. On March 20, 1875—her 50th birthday—Cornelia climbed to the roof of the South Building and rung its bell to celebrate her victory. She became known as 'The Woman Who Rang the Bell.'

Although she opposed coeducation and woman suffrage, she strongly advocated more educational opportunities for women. She was particularly proud when the university's first summer school for teachers enrolled female students in 1877. Although her sex prevented her from taking courses or teaching at the university, Cornelia wrote hymns for special occasions, organized community events, and kept the alumni records. In 1895, she became the first woman to receive an honorary degree from the University. "
http://www.civilwarwomenblog.com/2007/04/cornelia-phillips-spencer.html



1824 - Lucy Myers Wright Mitchell, an American historian of art, born.
"... Mitchell was one of the first Americans to write and publish a book on classical sculpture and was one of the first women to study the field of classical archaeology.Mitchell was born in Urumiah, Persia, and was the daughter of missionary and oriental scholar Austin Hazen Wright, and the sister of classical scholar, John Henry Wright. Her two-volume, 766 page work, A History of Ancient Sculpture, examines the history of ancient sculpture beginning with its origins in Ancient Egypt, and includes another volume of plates.[1]..." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucy_Myers_Wright_Mitchell

Parts of her work "A History of the Ancient Sculpture" can be found on this site http://books.google.com/books/about/A_history_of_ancient_sculpture.html?id=JM2wAAAAIAAJ


1869 - Amelia Bingham - an American stage performer and manager, born.
"...
893 Broadway debut as an actress THE STRUGGLE OF LIFE
1900 Assumed management of NYC's old Bijou Theater

1901 Organized the Amelia Bingham Stock Company

1902 England's Palace Theater production of BIG MOMENTS

1910-1926 First president of Professional Women's League, Charitable works for Elks Lodge #1 and Actor's Fund of America, appealed for roles for mature women, supported hometown activities.

1927 Buried from NYC's Little Church Around the Corner

1993 Inducted into the Ohio Women's Hall of Fame...."
 http://womenshistory.about.com/gi/o.htm?zi=1/XJ&zTi=1&sdn=womenshistory&cdn=education&tm=3&f=22&tt=2&bt=0&bts=1&zu=http%3A//www.hicksvilleusa.com/history/amelia.html









Edited by Don Quixote - 20-Mar-2012 at 23:39
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Mar-2012 at 01:35
March 21st:
1702 - Queen Anne Stuart addresses English parliament
1868 - 1st US professional women's club, Sorosis, forms in NYC
1874 - US Grant's daughter Nellie marries in the White House

1470/74: Angela Merici, the founder of the Ursuline Order, born in Desenzano del Garda, in Lombardi.
She and her sister became orphans, and went to live with her uncle; then her sister died too. Angela entered the Franciscan order, because she hoped that hear prayers would buy her sister a place in heaven. Her uncle died when she was 20, and she organized a school in her home, where she was educating girls; later she was invited to start a school in Brescia. According to a legend she lost her sight when on a travel to the Holy Land, while being on the island of Crete, but contunued her journey to the Holy land and was given her sight back on the same place she lost it several weeks ago.

"...On 25 November 1535, St Angela Merici chose twelve virgins and started the foundation of the "Company of St Ursula" near the Church of St Afra, in a small house in Brescia. On 18 March 1537, she was elected "Mother and Mistress" (Superior) of the order. Three years later, she died on 27 January 1540. Her body was clothed in the habit of a Franciscan tertiary and interred in the Church of St Afra, Brescia.

Saint Angela Merici was beatified in Rome on 30 April 1768, by Pope Clement XIII. She was later canonized on 24 May 1807, by Pope Pius VII.[2]..."http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angela_Merici

http://saints.sqpn.com/sainta20.gif

I really like this picture of her, I find it very spiritual.

http://www.h-t.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/AngelaMerici.jpg

1617 - Pocahontas buried.
Everyone knows the story Captain John Smith told about her saving him - and while this may be a real story or a exagerration, in reality she played an important role in the relations between the Native Americans from her tribe and the colonists  in her bringing food to the colonists, and negotiating from her father's side for the release of captured members of her tribe. She married a planter, after being captured  in 1613 by Captain Samuel Argall and spending an year in Jamestown; during which time she converted to Christianity. In 1616 she and her husband went to England, where she was treated like a princess, but contracted smallpox /or tuberculosis, or pneumonia or another lung disease, on which account differ/ and died.
http://apva.org/rediscovery/image/pocahont.jpg

1857 - Alice Henry born.
".. She attributed her passionate commitment to justice, democracy, and women's rights to the equal treatment she and her brother received from her parents.Denied access to a university education, yet accepting the need to support herself, Alice tried teaching but following a serious illness turned to journalism. She became a close friend and working associate of leading reformers Catherine Helen Spence, Henry Bournes Higgins and his sister Ina, Bernard O'Dowd, and Vida Goldstein and her family. She was active in women's clubs and the women suffrage campaign, and gained a reputation as a courageous public speaker in support of social change. In 1905, aged 48, she left for England. There she heard George Bernard Shaw speak, observed the militant suffragists, and toured Scotland. In December she sailed for New York where American interest in Australian progressivism ensured her a ready audience. Her knowledge of Australian labour legislation and woman suffrage got the attention of Margaret Dreier Robins, who invited Alice to work for the National Women's Trade Union League of America in Chicago. She became a key figure in the campaign for woman suffrage, union organization, vocational education, and labour legislation. She wrote two books, and in 1920-22 directed the league's educational department. .... She went to Melbourne in February 1925, intending to stay for two months but stayed for twelve. She then returned to America in March 1926 where she retired from active work and moved to Santa Barbara in California, in 1928. There, in 1929, her last significant article was on Henry Handel Richardson. It was published in The Bookman. Alice wishing to be with her brother, reluctantly returned to Australia in 1933. She was welcomed as a notable and successful Australian woman, but settling back into Melbourne was slow and painful. She attempted to continue her old activities by joining the Playgrounds' Association and the National Council of Women of Victoria. She gave radio talks on prohibition and modern poetry. ... In 1937 she compiled a bibliography of Australian women writers. ..." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_Henry
http://ocp.hul.harvard.edu/ww/images/henry.jpg

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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Mar-2012 at 23:48
March 22nd:





Edited by Don Quixote - 23-Mar-2012 at 23:52
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Mar-2012 at 23:53
March 23rd:
1638 - Religious dissident Anne Hutchinson expelled from Mass Bay Colony
1822 - Gioacchino Rossini marries Isabella Colbran in Bologna
1943 - Obligatory work for woman ends in Belgium
1964 - Carol Mann wins LPGA Women's Western Golf Open Invitational
1968 - Jarmila Novotna resigns presidency of Czechoslovakia
1970 - Kathy Whitworth wins LPGA Orange Blossom Golf Classic
1977 - Indira Gandhi resigns as PM of India

1775 - Anne Catherine Hoofgreen, and American printer and publisher, died.
"...Anne Hoof was most likely born in the Netherlands around 1720. She emigrated to America and lived in Annapolis, Maryland. She married Jonas Green (c.1720-1767) of Boston in 1738 and had fourteen children, with six surviving infancy.[1]Green's paper was the main source for news. ... John Dickinson's celebrated Letters from a Pennsylvania Farmer were first published in that journal.(http://www.britannica.com) The Greens were originally from Philadelphia but moved to Annapolis once Jonas was given the orders of taking over the Maryland Gazette.

After the death of Jonas, in the April 16, 1767 issue of the paper Anne announced that she would continue to publish the paper. She became the printer of the General Assembly, taking over her husband's contract.[1]The Maryland Gazette was critical of British policy. Green had her portrait painted by Charles Willson Peale after he returned to America in 1769. The words "Annapolis printer to..." appear on the paper Anne is holding in the portrait, referring to Maryland legislature's choice to have Anne succeed her husband as the official printer of the colony of Maryland. Under her guidance business was thriving, and she became one of the few women of her time to gain success in the male-dominated business world.[2]She died on March 23, 1775...."http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_Catherine_Hoof_Green

http://www.msa.md.gov/msa/educ/exhibits/womenshall/images/green.jpg

1830 - Sarah Elizabeth Doyle, an American feminist and educator, born in Providence, Rhode Island.

"...She spent 36 years as a high school teacher and principal, helped found the coeducational Rhode Island School of Design and was instrumental in permanently funding Brown University's new Women's College...." http://encyclopedia.farlex.com/Doyle,+Sarah+Elizabeth

http://www.soho-art.com/shopinfo/uploads/1231385914_large-image_cecilia038lg.jpg

1882 - Emmy Noether, a German mathematician, born in Erlangen, Germany. She became:

"... an influential German mathematician known for her groundbreaking contributions to abstract algebra and theoretical physics. Described by Pavel Alexandrov, Albert Einstein, Jean Dieudonné, Hermann Weyl, Norbert Wiener and others as the most important woman in the history of mathematics,[2][3] she revolutionized the theories of rings, fields, and algebras. In physics, Noether's theorem explains the fundamental connection between symmetry and conservation laws.[4]...

...Noether's mathematical work has been divided into three "epochs".[5] In the first (1908–1919), she made significant contributions to the theories of algebraic invariants and number fields. Her work on differential invariants in the calculus of variations, Noether's theorem, has been called "one of the most important mathematical theorems ever proved in guiding the development of modern physics".[6] In the second epoch, (1920–1926), she began work that "changed the face of [abstract] algebra".[7] In her classic paper Idealtheorie in Ringbereichen (Theory of Ideals in Ring Domains, 1921) Noether developed the theory of ideals in commutative rings into a powerful tool with wide-ranging applications. She made elegant use of the ascending chain condition, and objects satisfying it are named Noetherian in her honor. In the third epoch, (1927–1935), she published major works on noncommutative algebras and hypercomplex numbers and united the representation theory of groups with the theory of modules and ideals. In addition to her own publications, Noether was generous with her ideas and is credited with several lines of research published by other mathematicians, even in fields far removed from her main work, such as algebraic topology...." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emmy_Noether

http://www.agnesscott.edu/lriddle/women/noether.jpg


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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Mar-2012 at 14:00
March 24th:

    1603: Queen Elizabeth I of England died

    http://englishhistory.net/tudor/monarchs/eliz1-scrots.jpg

    http://englishhistory.net/tudor/monarchs/eliz1-rainbow.jpg

    1820: Fanny Crosby born

    "...Frances Jane Crosby (March 24, 1820 – February 12, 1915), usually known as Fanny Crosby in the United States and by her married name, Frances van Alstyne, in the United Kingdom, was an American Methodist rescue mission worker, poet, lyricist, and composer. During her lifetime, she was well-known throughout the United States. By the end of the 19th century, she was "a household name"[1] and "one of the most prominent figures in American evangelical life".[2] She became blind while an infant.

Best known for her Protestant Christian hymns and gospel songs, Crosby was "the premier hymnist of the gospel song period",[3] and one of the most prolific hymnists in history, writing over 8,000,[4][5] with over 100 million copies of her songs printed.[6]..." http://en.wikipedia.or/wiki/Fanny_Crosby
File:Fanny Crosby - Project Gutenberg eText 18444.jpg

    1827: Candace Thurber Wheeler born

    "...Candace Wheeler (1827–1923), often credited as the "mother" of interior design, was one of America's first woman interior and textile designers. She is famous for helping to open the field of interior design to women, making decorative art affordable, and for encouraging a new style of American design. In the years after the Civil War, she advocated the fields of applied art, fine art and design as suitable for women, especially for the thousands of war widows who needed to be able to support their families. Wheeler was instrumental in the development of art courses for women in a number of major American cities. She was associated with the Colonial Revival, Aesthetic Movement, and the Arts and Crafts Movement throughout her long career, Wheeler was considered a national authority on home decoration. Wheeler was a member of the Associated Artists, along with Louis Comfort Tiffany. She founded the Society of Decorative Art in New York City (1877), and encouraged the creation of similar artistic societies across the country. Wheeler is also noted for designing the interior of the Women's Building at the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, IL...." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Candace_Wheeler

    The woman

    http://publishing.cdlib.org/ucpressebooks/data/13030/8v/ft838nb58v/figures/ft838nb58v_00010.jpg

    and her work

    http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/images/h2/h2_2002.355.1.jpg

    1899: Dorothy Constance Stratton born

    "...Dorothy Constance Stratton (March 24, 1899 - September 17, 2006) was the director of the SPARS, the United States Coast Guard Women's Reserve during World War II....She developed the name SPARS using a contraction of the Coast Guard motto Semper Paratus and its English translation Always Ready. She was appointed its first director with a rank of lieutenant commander.

Stratton continued in the post until 1946 and rose to the rank of captain. As director, she oversaw over 10,000 enlisted women and 1,000 commissioned officers.She left the Coast Guard in 1946 shortly before the SPARS were demobilized. For her service she was awarded the Legion of Merit....

After the war, Stratton served as director of personnel for the International Monetary Fund (1947–1950). In 1950, she became national executive director of the Girl Scouts of the USA, a post she held until 1960. In 1958, she appeared as a guest challenger on the TV panel show "To Tell The Truth". Stratton died in West Lafayette, Indiana at the age of 107. .."http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothy_C._Stratton

File:Dorothycstratton.jpg

The Women Officers Professional Association (now the Sea Services Leadership Association) named its Captain Dorothy Stratton Leadership Award in her honor. Created in 2001, the award is presented to a female officer (W-2 to O-4) of the Coast Guard who shows leadership and mentorship and who shares the Coast Guard's core values. In 2005, the Ottawa University Alumni Association awarded its Outstanding Achievement Award to Stratton.In 2008, the Coast Guard named its third National Security Cutter the USCGC Stratton (WMSL-752) in her honor.

    1912: Dorothy Height born (activist)

    1953: Queen Mary, consort of George V of Great Britain, and formerly known as Mary of Teck, died. (story) She was mother of Edward VIII and George VI, and grandmother of Elizabeth II.

    http://www.picturehistory.com/images/products/1/3/2/prod_13232.jpg

    http://www.britroyals.com/images/mary_teck.jpg




Edited by Don Quixote - 24-Mar-2012 at 14:01
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25-Mar-2012 at 14:17
March 25th:
1911 - Triangle Shirtwaist Factory catches fire 145 die, all but 13 girls
1916 - Women are allowed to attend a boxing match
1979 - Nancy Lopez wins LPGA Sahara National Pro-Am Golf Tournament

1586: Margaret Clitherow executed for harboring priests; she was canonized in 1970

"...Martyr, called the "Pearl of York", born about 1556; died 25 March 1586. She was a daughter of Thomas Middleton, Sheriff of York (1564-5), a wax-chandler; married John Clitherow, a wealthy butcher and a chamberlain of the city, in St. Martin's church, Coney St., 8 July, 1571, and lived in the Shambles, a street still unaltered. Converted to the Faith about three years later, she became most fervent, continually risking her life by harbouring and maintaining priests, was frequently imprisoned, sometimes for two years at a time, yet never daunted, and was a model of all virtues. Though her husband belonged to the Established Church, he had a brother a priest, and Margaret provided two chambers, one adjoining her house and a second in another part of the city, where she kept priests hidden and had Mass continually celebrated through the thick of the persecution. Some of her priests were martyred, and Margaret who desired the same grace above all things, used to make secret pilgrimages by night to York Tyburn to pray beneath the gibbet for this intention. Finally arrested on 10 March, 1586, she was committed to the castle. On 14 March, she was arraigned before Judges Clinch and Rhodes and several members of the Council of the North at the York assizes. Her indictment was that she had harboured priests, heard Mass, and the like; but she refused to plead, since the only witnesses against her would be her own little children and servants, whom she could not bear to involve in the guilt of her death. She was therefore condemned to the peine forte et dure, i.e. to be pressed to death. "God be thanked, I am not worthy of so good a death as this", she said. Although she was probably with child, this horrible sentence was carried out on Lady Day, 1586 (Good Friday according to New Style). She had endured an agony of fear the previous night, but was now calm, joyous, and smiling. She walked barefooted to the tollbooth on Ousebridge, for she had sent her hose and shoes to her daughter Anne, in token that she should follow in her steps. She had been tormented by the ministers and even now was urged to confess her crimes. "No, no, Mr. Sheriff, I die for the love of my Lord Jesu", she answered. She was laid on the ground, a sharp stone beneath her back, her hands stretched out in the form of a cross and bound to two posts. Then a door was placed upon her, which was weighted down till she was crushed to death. Her last words during an agony of fifteen minutes, were "Jesu! Jesu! Jesu! have mercy on me!" Her right hand is preserved at St. Mary's Convent, York, but the resting-place of her sacred body is not known. Her sons Henry and William became priests, and her daughter Anne a nun at St. Ursula's, Louvain...." http://womenshistory.about.com/gi/o.htm?zi=1/XJ&zTi=1&sdn=womenshistory&cdn=education&tm=2400&f=22&tt=2&bt=1&bts=1&zu=http%3A//www.newadvent.org/cathen/04059b.htm

http://saints.sqpn.com/saintm54.gif

1826: Matilda Joslyn Gage,  a suffragist, abolitionist, and Native American activist, born

"...Matilda Gage spent her childhood in a house which was a station of the underground railroad. She faced prison for her actions under the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 which criminalized assistance to escaped slaves. Even though she was beset by both financial and physical (cardiac) problems throughout her life, her work for women's rights was extensive, practical, and often brilliantly executed.

Gage became involved in the women's rights movement in 1852 when she decided to speak at the National Women's Rights Convention in Syracuse, New York. She served as president of the National Woman Suffrage Association from 1875 to 1876, and served as either Chair of the Executive Committee or Vice President for over twenty years. During the 1876 convention, she successfully argued against a group of police who claimed the association was holding an illegal assembly. They left without pressing charges...."http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matilda_Joslyn_Gage

She was an educated and prolific writer, sending articles to many newspapers and magazines, and bought an Ohio newspaper, the "Ballot Box" and became it's editor for 3 years, publishing on wide variety of subjects. She established the:

"... Women's National Liberal Union (WNLU) in 1890, of which she was president until her death (by stroke) in 1898. Attracting more radical members than NAWSA, the WNLU was the perfect mouthpiece for her attacks on religion. She became the editor of the official journal of the WNLU, The Liberal Thinker...."

Between the idea she supported was the separation of church and state, she wrote numerous articles on that; opposed abortion on principle, and rooted for planned motherhood, including the right of a wife to refuse sex, and wrote on the right of woman to divorce an adulterous husband; and last but not least, she decried the treatment of Native Americans and supported their right to be considered as separate ethno-cultural communities.

Matilda Joslyn Gage

1830: Maggie Van Cott (Margaret Ann Newton Van Cott), the first woman to be licensed to preach from the Methodist Church, born.

1862: Rose Greenhow, Civil War hostess and spy, was tried for treason. Quote from Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America: "But for you there would have been no Battle of Bull Run."

1868: Belle Sherwin born

"...After Oxford, she taught history for four years at St. Margaret's and Miss Hersey's School for Girls, a private school in Boston. After teaching in Boston, Belle returned to Cleveland in 1900 and became the first President of the Consumers League of Ohio.  Prior to World War I,  Sherwin was active in various social welfare groups such as the Visiting Nurses Association and the Federation for Charity and Philanthropy and the Council for Social Agencies.  After World War I, Sherwin became the director of the Cleveland Welfare Federation.  Next she became the Vice President of the National League of Women Voters from 1921-24 and became its President from 1924-34, the position which earned her much of her reputation as a dedicated suffragist leader.  She was also on the board of the National Urban League, founded in 1918...." http://www.lkwdpl.org/wihohio/sher-bel.htm

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5a/Belle_Sherwin_1924.jpg/220px-Belle_Sherwin_1924.jpg

1911: The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire killed 146 immigrant women workers

1914: Aline Saarinen born

1925: Flannery O'Connor born

1934: Gloria Steinem born

1967: Debi Thomas born (Olympic gold medalist)

1971: Sheryl Swopes born (basketball player)

Feast Day: Saint Margaret Clith


Edited by Don Quixote - 25-Mar-2012 at 14:21
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Mar-2012 at 23:45
March 26th:
1936 - Mary Joyce ends a 1,000 mile trip by dog in Alaska
1943 - 1st woman to receive air medal (US army nurse Elsie S Ott)
1961 - Louise Suggs wins LPGA Golden Circle of Golf Festival

    1863: Bertha Van Hoosen born

    "...Born on a farm near the town of Rochester, Michigan, Bertha Van Hoosen was the daughter of a Dutch Canadian farmer. ... She describes attending college and medical school at the University of Michigan, her career at the Women's Hospital in Detroit, and her practice in Chicago as an obstetrician and gynecologist. She also includes her experiences teaching anatomy and embryology at the Northwestern University Women's Medical School...." http://womenshistory.about.com/gi/o.htm?zi=1/XJ&zTi=1&sdn=womenshistory&cdn=education&tm=247&f=22&tt=2&bt=1&bts=0&zu=http%3A//www.genealogy.org/db.asp%3Fdbid%3D4051

    http://blog.chicagohistory.org/wp-content/uploads/i64810.jpg

    1869: Agnes Gertrude Regan, a Catholic social welfare and educator, born.

    1877: Kate Richards O'Hare Cunningham born

    "...Kate Richards was born in Ada, Kansas, on 26th March, 1877. After a brief schooling in Nebraska, she became an apprentice machinist in Kansas City. Deeply religious, Richards joined the Women's Christian Temperance Union.
    Richards was influenced by the books on overcoming poverty by Henry George and Henry Demarest Lloyd
    . However, it was a speech made by Mary 'Mother' Jones and meeting Julius Wayland, the editor of Appeal to Reason, that converted her to socialism.

    Richards joined the Socialist Labor Party in 1899 and two years later the Socialist Party of America. In 1902 she married Francis O'Hare and they spent their honeymoon lecturing on socialism. This included visits to Britain, Canada and Mexico. Richards wrote the successful socialist novel, What Happened to Dan? (1904) and with her husband edited the
    National Rip-Saw, a radical journal published in St. Louis. In 1910 she unsuccessfully ran for the Kansas Congress.
    Richards believed that the First World War had been caused by the imperialist competitive system and argued that the USA should remain neutral. In 1917 Richards became chair of the Committee on War and Militarism and toured the country making speeches against the war.

    After the USA declared war on the Central Powers in 1917, the government passed the Espionage Act. Under this act it was an offence to make speeches that undermined the war effort. Criticised as unconstitutional, the act resulted in the imprisonment of many members of the anti-war movement including 450 conscientious objectors.
    In July, 1917, Richards was sentenced to five years for making an anti-war speech in North Dakota...

    While in prison Richards published two books, Kate O'Hare's Prison Letters (1919) and In Prison (1920). After a nationwide campaign President Calvin Coolidge commuted her sentence. In 1922 Richards organized the Children's Crusade, a march on Washington, by children of those anti-war agitators still in prison.
    Richards and her husband settled in Leesville, Louisiana, where they joined the Llano Cooperative Colony, published the American Vanguard and helped establish the Commonwealth College. Richards also took a keen interest in prison reform and carried out a national survey of prison labour (1924-26).


    In 1928 Richards married Charles Cunningham, a San Francisco lawyer. She remained active in politics and in 1934 helped Upton Sinclair in his socialist campaign to become the governor of California. Kate Richards, who was assistant director of the California Department of Penology (1939-40) died in Benicia, California, on 10th January, 1948..
    ."

    With her 4 kids:

    1923: Sarah Bernhardt died (actress)

    "...Bernhardt's reputation was established in 1869 by her appearance as Zanetto, the wandering minstrel in Francois Coppee's Le Passant, and affirmed in 1872 by her triumph as the Queen in Victor Hugo's Ruy Blas. Soon after this she returned to the Comedie Francaise, where she won further acclaim for her performances in Racine's Phedre and Hugo's Hernani. Bernhardt's position as the greatest actress and one of the most magnetic personalities of her time was by now secure. She was eulogized for her voix d'or (golden voice) and for the scope and emotional power of her acting.

In 1880, after a triumphant season in London, she broke her contract with the Comedie Francaise and embarked upon an independent career with the first of six tours of America, returning to Europe for triumphs in England and Denmark. Her repertoire included La Dame aux Camelias by the younger Alexandre Dumas and Frou-frou by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halevy. She became manager of the Theatre de la Renaissance, which she opened with a performance of Jules Lemaitre's Les Rois. In 1898 she sold her lease of this theater and bought the Theatre des Nations, which she renamed the Theatre Sarah-Bernhardt.

The opening play, a revival of Victorien Sardou's La Tosca, was followed by a production in French of Hamlet. Max Beerbohm, in a review, captured the essential incongruity of Bernhardt in the title role by labeling her ``Hamlet, Princess of Denmark.'' Undaunted by her critics, she promptly ventured on the title role in Edmond Rostand's L'Aiglon. The hero of this play is Napoleon's son, who is kept in semi-captivity after the fall of the empire. Despite the seeming audacity of a middle- aged woman playing a boy's part, L'Aiglon was one of the greatest financial successes ever achieved in Paris. In 1905, while performing in Rio de Janeiro, she suffered an injury to her right leg. By 1911 she was unable to walk unsupported, and in 1915 the leg was amputated. Despite the handicap of an artificial leg, she continued her acting career, even performing at the front during World War I. In 1914 she became a Chevalier of the Legion of Honor. Her last stage appearance was in La Gloire (1922) by Maurice Rostand. She died in Paris on Mar. 26, 1923.

Bernhardt was the first great actress to appear in films, starring in La Reine Elizabeth and La Dame aux Camelias in 1911. Bernhardt' s artistic gifts included sculpture and writing; she published several plays and her memoirs, Ma Double Vie (1907)...." http://www.sarahbernhardt.com/bio.html

http://trialx.com/curetalk/wp-content/blogs.dir/7/files/2012/03/celebrities/Sarah_Bernhardt-3.jpg





Edited by Don Quixote - 26-Mar-2012 at 23:48
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-Mar-2012 at 21:40
March 27th:

    1482: Mary of Burgundy died of a fall from her horse.

    "...The only child of Charles the Bold of Burgundy and Isabelle de Bourbon, Mary of Burgundy became ruler of his lands after her father's death in 1477. Louis XI of France attempted to force her to marry the Dauphin Charles, thus bringing under French control her lands, including the Netherlands, Franche-Comte, Artois, and Picardy (the Low Countries).

Mary, however, did not want to marry Charles, who was 13 years younger than she was. In order to win support for her refusal among her own people, she signed "the Great Privilege" which returned significant control and rights to localities in the Netherlands. This agreement required the approval of the States to raise taxes, declare war or make peace. She signed this agreement on February 10, 1477.

Mary of Burgundy had many other suitors, including Duke Clarence of England. Mary chose Maximilian, archduke of Austria, of the Habsburg (Hapsburg) family, who later became emperor Maximilian I. They married on August 18, 1477. As a result, her lands became part of the Habsburg empire.Mary and Maximilian had three children...." http://womenshistory.about.com/od/medrenqueens/p/mary_burgundy.htm

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7f/Mary_of_burgundy_pocher.jpg/220px-Mary_of_burgundy_pocher.jpg

    http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4128/5211308552_a5b925bb4d_z.jpg

    1712: Jane Franklin Mecom born

    "...Jane Franklin Mecom (1712–1794) was the youngest sister of Benjamin Franklin. She wrote to him all her life; their letters and an account of her life are preserved in Carl van Doren's The Letters of Benjamin Franklin and Jane Mecom (Princeton University Press, 1950) and in his Jane Mecom, or, The Favorite Sister of Benjamin Franklin: Her Life here first narrated from their entire surviving Correspondence (Viking Press: NY, 1950). She married at age 15 and had 12 children in her life, but 11 died before she did. [1] She was never sent to school. [2] Her husband, a saddler named Edward Mecom, became physically and possibly mentally ill; two of their sons went insane. Jane Mecom struggled, and failed, to keep them out of debtors’ prison, the almshouse, and asylums. She sewed bonnets and took in boarders to earn money. She wrote what she called her “Book of Ages,” a story of her life, only 14 pages long. [3] When Benjamin Franklin died in 1790, he left Jane the house in which she lived in his will, and she continued to live there until she died; however, later her house was demolished to make room for a memorial to Paul Revere. [4]..."http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jane_Mecom

    1724: Jane Colden born

1824: Virginia Louisa Minor born

In 1867, Minor co-founded and became the first president of the Woman's Suffrage Association of Missouri (later an affiliate of the American Woman Suffrage Association). Minor personally sided with the National Woman's Suffrage Association, prompting her resignation as President of the Missouri Association. At an 1869 convention in St. Louis, Minor stated that "the Constitution of the United States gives me every right and privilege to which every other citizen is entitled." Later that year, Francis and Virginia Minor drafted and circulated pamphlets arguing for women's suffrage based on the newly-passed Fourteenth Amendment.

In 1867, Minor co-founded and became the first president of the Woman's Suffrage Association of Missouri (later an affiliate of the American Woman Suffrage Association). Minor personally sided with the National Woman's Suffrage Association, prompting her resignation as President of the Missouri Association. At an 1869 convention in St. Louis, Minor stated that "the Constitution of the United States gives me every right and privilege to which every other citizen is entitled." Later that year, Francis and Virginia Minor drafted and circulated pamphlets arguing for women's suffrage based on the newly-passed Fourteenth Amendment.

On October 15, 1872, Virginia Minor attempted to register to vote in St. Louis. When election registrar Reese Happersett turned her down, Virginia (represented by Francis) filed suit in the Missouri state courts. The trial court, Missouri Supreme Court, and United States Supreme Court all ruled in favor of the state of Missouri. The Supreme Court unanimously held "that the Constitution of the United States does not confer the right of suffrage upon any one", and that the decision of who should be entitled to vote was left to the legislative branch.

Virginia Minor testified in support of women's suffrage before the United States Senate in 1889, and was honorary vice president of the Interstate Woman Suffrage Convention in 1892. She died in St. Louis in 1894. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virginia_Minor

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f2/Virginialouisaminor.gif

    1858: Florence Finch Kelly born

    1867: Edyth Walker born

    1868: Patty Smith Hill born ( Happy birthday to you!)

    1878: Edith Isaacs born

    1880: Ruth Hana McCormick Simms born

    1912: Two Japanese cherry trees planted along the Potomac River in Washington, DC, by First Lady Helen Herron Taft and the wife of the Japanese ambassador, Viscountess Chinda; the idea was a fulfillment of a long campaign by photographer and travel writer Eliza Ruhamah Scidmore.

    1924: Sarah Lois Vaughan born

    1945: Anna Mae Aquash born





Edited by Don Quixote - 27-Mar-2012 at 21:46
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29-Mar-2012 at 01:57
March 28th:

Westley played roles, both comic and dramatic, in many films. They included Death Takes a Holiday, All This and Heaven Too, four films opposite child star Shirley Temple (including Dimples and Heidi), the 1934 surprise hit Anne of Green Gables, the 1935 film version of Roberta, and the 1936 film version of Show Boat, in which she replaced Edna May Oliver, when Ms. Oliver declined to repeat her stage role as Parthy Ann Hawks. She also appeared in Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm in 1938 with Shirley Temple and Randolph Scott as Aunt Miranda. In 1936 she played in Banjo on My Knee with Barbara Stanwyck, Walter Brennan and Buddy Ebsen...." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helen_Westley

http://broadway.cas.sc.edu/broadwayPhotographs/SteinHelen.Westley.Hewhogetsslapped.jpg


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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29-Mar-2012 at 23:06
March 29th:

1831: Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr, a British American novelist, born

"...In 1850 she married William Barr, and four years later they immigrated to the United States and settled in Galveston, Texas where her husband and three of their six children died of yellow fever in 1867. With her three remaining daughters, Mrs. Barr moved to Ridgewood,New Jersey in 1868. She came there to tutor the three sons of a prominent citizen, William Libby, and opened a school in a small house. This structure still stands at the southwest corner of Van Dien and Linwood Avenues. Amelia Barr did not like Ridgewood and did not remain there for very long.She left shortly after selling a story to a magazine.[Caldwell,William A.,et al.,"The History of a Village, Ridgewood,N.J.," State Tercentenary Committee, c. 1964, p. 32] In 1869, she moved to New York City where she began to write for religious periodicals and to publish a series of semi-historical tales and novels.

By 1891, when she achieved greater success, she and her daughters moved up the Hudson River to Cornwall-on-Hudson, New York, where they renovated a house on the slopes of Storm King Mountain and named it Cherry Croft.[1] The name has been applied to that period of her career, the most productive and successful. She remained there until moving in with her daughter Lilly in White Plains in her last years...." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amelia_Edith_Huddleston_Barr

She was very prolific, writing the following books:

  • Romance and Reality (1872), Jan Vedder's Wife (1885), A Daughter of Fife (1886), A Bow of Orange Ribbon (1886), Remember the Alamo (1888), Friend Olivia (1891), A Rose of a Hundred Leaves (1891), Birds of a Feather (1893), The Lone House (1894), Bernicia (1895), A Knight of the Nets (1896), Trinity Bells (1899), The Maid of Maiden Lane (1900), Souls of Passage (1901), The Lion's Whelp (1901), Thyra Varrick (1903), The Man Between (1906), The Black Shilling, The Belle of Bowling Green (1908), The Strawberry Handkerchief (1908), The Hands of Compulsion (1909), The House of Cherry Street (1909), A Reconstructed Marriage (1910), Sheila Vedder (1911), The Measure of a Man (1915)

File:Amelia E Barr works.jpg

1840: Isabella Thoburn born. She:

"... was an American Christian missionary of the Methodist Episcopal Church best known for her establishment of educational institutions and missionary work in North India, subsequent to East India Company relinquishing power to British government in India.She was born March 29, 1840, near St. Clairsville, Ohio, U.S. died September 1, 1901, Lucknow, India

She was an American missionary to India whose work in education there, culminated in the founding of an important woman’s college, Isabella Thoburn College in Lucknow and Methodist High School in Kanpur. These two educational establishments were amongst the first in colonial India, catering to educational and religious needs of emergent Anglo Indian population in Awadh.

Thoburn attended local schools in United States and the Wheeling Female Seminary in Wheeling, Virginia (now West Virginia). In 1866, after she had taught for several years, Isabella was invited by her brother James Mills Thoburn, a [Methodist Episcopal] [missionary in India], to join and assist him, in his educational and missionary work in India. She delayed her departure until 1869, when the formation of the Women’s Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church enabled her to undertake missionary work under denominational affiliation and auspices...." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella_Thoburn

http://www.oikoumene.org/typo3temp/pics/607bc093b8.jpg

1843: Frances Wisebart Jacobs born

"...The establishment of Denver's National Jewish Hospital, in 1899, was the result of the work of Colorado's "Mother of Charity" - Frances Wisebart Jacobs. She dreamed of a hospital open to any person destitute and stricken with tuberculosis; a medical center where scientific research joins forces with medical treatment. She wanted to bring new hope to those suffering chronic lung disease.

Frances was born in Kentucky in 1843. After her marriage she moved with her husband to Central City in 1865 and then to Denver in 1874. She quickly became active in charity work in this growing city. Frances was elected president of the Hebrew Benevolent Ladies Aid Society and was one of the original officers of the non-sectarian Ladies Relief Society. She was the only woman, and the only Jewish member of the five founders of the forerunner of the Community Chest subsequently known at United Way...." http://womenshistory.about.com/gi/o.htm?zi=1/XJ&zTi=1&sdn=womenshistory&cdn=education&tm=722&f=22&tt=2&bt=0&bts=0&zu=http%3A//www.cogreatwomen.org/jacobs.htm

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/52/Frances_Wisebart_Jacobs.jpg/300px-Frances_Wisebart_Jacobs.jpg

1874: Lou Henry Hoover the wife of President of the United States Herbert Hoover and First Lady, born

http://www.whitehousehistory.org/whha_pictures/images/hoover-02.jpg

1880: Rosina Lhevinne, a Russian  born American pianist and musical pedagogue

"...Among her students were many of the best young pianists of the 1940s, 50s and 60s including Van Cliburn, who arrived in her class in 1951. At the height of the Cold War in 1958, he was awarded the First Prize at the inaugural Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow becoming an instant worldwide celebrity and bringing international fame to his teacher. Other Lhévinne students include James Levine, now Music Director of the Metropolitan Opera and the Boston Symphony, John Williams, composer and conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra, pianists John Browning, Walter Buczynski, Olegna Fuschi, Tong-Il Han, Daniel Pollack, Misha Dichter, Edward Auer, Santos Ojeda and many others including several present-day teachers at the Juilliard School.

In 1949 Mme. Lhévinne reconsidered her decision never to play in public as a soloist, and in her 70s and 80s she made a remarkable series of appearances, first in collaboration with the Juilliard String Quartet, and later in concertos at the Aspen Summer Music Festival. Her greatest moment as a soloist came in January 1963, aged 82, with her debut at the New York Philharmonic under conductor Leonard Bernstein playing Frédéric Chopin's Piano Concerto No. 1, a piece she had performed for her graduation from the Moscow Conservatory sixty-five years earlier. There are recordings of both the Chopin Concerto and Mozart's C major Concerto, K. 467.

Madame Lhévinne continued to teach at Juilliard and at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles where she died at age 96...." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosina_Lh%C3%A9vinne

Rosina Lhévinne /fer left/ with her Vasily Ilyich Safonov and fellow pupils

http://jwa.org/system/files/mediaobjects/rosina-lhevinne.jpg

1903: Vera Micheles Dean born

"... Vera Micheles Dean was born in Russia to parents who later fled from the Bolshevik revolution. Educated at Radcliffe College (AB '25, Ph.D. '28), she joined the staff of the Foreign Policy Association, where she spent most of her professional life. The Association, founded in 1918, provided unbiased, factual information on foreign affairs to the American public. In 1933 she became Editor of Research Publications; from 1938 to 1961 she was Research Director and, from 1951 to 1961, she also served as Editor of Foreign Policy Bulletin.

Vera Micheles Dean's reputation as an author, editor, and specialist in international relations enabled her to find additional work as a consultant and teacher. In 1943 and 1945 she served on the U.S. delegations to the founding conferences of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration and the United Nations. In 1954-1962, VMD directed the Non-Western Civilization Program at the University of Rochester. After her retirement from the Foreign Policy Association she served as Professor of International Development at New York University's Graduate School of Public Administration from 1962 to 1971. ...." http://oasis.lib.harvard.edu/oasis/deliver/~sch00545

1918: Pearl Bailey, and American singer and performer, born.

http://www.freewebs.com/trf18/pearl-bailey.jpg




Edited by Don Quixote - 29-Mar-2012 at 23:10
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30-Mar-2012 at 22:43
March 30th:

    1810: Ann Sophia Stephens, an American essayist, born

    "...While in Portland, she and her husband co-founded, published and edited the Portland Magazine, a monthly literary periodical where some of her early work first appeared.[2] The magazine was sold in 1837. They moved to New York where Ann took the job of editor to The Ladies Companion and where she could further her literary work. This was also the time she adopted the humorous pseudonym Jonathan Slick. Over the next few years she wrote over twenty-five serial novels plus short stories and poems for several well known periodicals which included Godey's Lady's Book and Graham's Magazine.[5] She started her own magazine Mrs Stephens' Illustrated New Monthly in 1856, it was published by her husband.[6] The magazine merged with Peterson's Magazine a few years later. Her first novel Fashion and famine was published in 1854.

The term "dime novel" originated with Stephens's Maleaska, the Indian Wife of the White Hunter, printed in the first book in Beadle & Adams Beadle’s Dime Novels series, dated June 9, 1860. The novel was a reprint of Stephens's earlier serial that appeared in the Ladies' Companion magazine in February, March, and April 1839. Later, the Grolier Club listed Maleaska as the most influential book of 1860.[7] Some of her other work includes High Life in New York (1843), Alice Copley: A Tale of Queen Mary's Time (1844), The Diamond Necklace and Other Tale (1846), The Old Homestead (1855), The Rejected Wife (1863) and A Noble Woman (1871)...." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ann_S._Stephens

File:Ann S. Stephens LibraryCompany a lg cropped.jpg




Edited by Don Quixote - 30-Mar-2012 at 22:46
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01-Apr-2012 at 01:05
March 31st:

1492: Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand issue edict expelling Jews from Spain

1776: Abigail Adams writes to her husband, John Adams: "If particular care and attention is not paid to the ladies, we are determined to foment a rebellion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any laws in which we have no voice or representation."

1823: Mary Boykin Miller Chesnut born

1833: Mary Abigail Dodge (Gail Hamilton) born

1855: Charlotte Brontë died of pregnancy complications

1856: Mary Sherwood born

1889: Muriel Hazel Wrigh
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02-Apr-2012 at 03:19
April 1st:

    1204: Eleanor of Aquitaine died

    http://www.renderplus.com/hartgen/images/royalty/eleanora-aquitaine_sm.png

    1776: Sophie Germain born (French mathematician and number theorist)

    http://www.oocities.org/viennalarp/images/cast/Sophie_Germain.jpg

    1818: Maria Mitchell born (first female professional astronomer in the United States)

    http://www.lucidcafe.com/library/95aug/95auggifs/mitchell.gif

    1855: Agnes Repplier, an American essayist and biographer, born in Philadelphia. Her essays were highly valued for the common sense, wit and scholarship she showed in them. Here some of her works:

    "...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agnes_Repplier

    • Books and Men (1888), Points of View (1891); Essays in Miniature (1892); Essays in Idleness (1893); In the Dozy Hours (1894); Varia (1897); Philadelphia: The Place and the People (1898); The Fireside Sphinx (1901); Compromises (1904); In Our Convent Days (1905); A Happy Half Century (1908); Americans and Others (1912); The Cat (1912); Counter Currents (1915); Points of Friction (1920); Under Dispute (1924); To Think of Tea! (1931); Times and Tendencies (1931); In Pursuit of Laughter (1936); Eight Decades (1937)..." 

    1866: Sophonisba Preston Breckenridge, an American social worker, activist, educator, and attorney, born.

    "...Along with others such as Jane Addams, Sophonisba created the Woman's Peace Party, which she was a secretary. In 1915 and attended the International Congress of Women at the Hague in which the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom was created (1971, 235). It is suggested that she chose not to pursue a career in law because she felt the impact first hand on how difficult it is for a woman to earn a doctorate (1992). It was in 1925 when she became a full professor . As a result of this she chose to teach at the University of Chicago where she began the School of Civics and Philanthropy, later renamed the Department of Social Service Administration (1992). It was her where she later started a women's course (1992). In the courses she taught her students about women in the family, business, and professions (1992). In her courses she used her works Family Welfare Work in a Metropolitan Community (1924), Public Welfare Administration (1927), and The Family and the State at was published in 1934 (1971). Even though she became dean at the university, she realized that men usually took care of the administration at schools even though education is considered a woman's area (1992). It was in the Graduate School of Social Service Administration where Sophonisba taught (1997)...."

    "...She was finally given the recognition she deserved when in 1933 she was named by President Roosevelt to be a delegate to the Pan-American Congress in Monte-video. Not only was this an honor but she was the first women to be awarded. It was in 1934 when she was elected to be the president of the American Association of Schools of Social Work (1971)..." http://www.webster.edu/~woolflm/breckenridge.html

    http://www.socialwelfarehistory.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Sophonisba-Breckinridge.jpg

    1877: Aurelia Isabel Henry Reinhardt born (president of Mills College)

    "...

    President Reinhardt at her desk in 1922. Courtesy of the Special Collections Department, F.W. Olin Library, Mills College

    Aurelia Henry married Dr. George Reinhardt in 1906. Just six years later, she found herself a widow and the single parent of two small sons. She was able to secure a teaching position through the University of California's extension program. Then, in 1916, her life and that of a small, struggling women's college irreversibly changed when she assumed the presidency of Mills College in Oakland. She remained as its head for twenty-seven years, retiring in 1943 after a successful program of student and faculty expansion. Among the universities granting her honorary degrees were the University of California, the University of Southern California, and Oberlin College.



    A painting of Reinhardt by R.L. Partington, which hangs in the Ethel Moore Dining Room at Mills College. Courtesy of the Special Collections Department, F.W. Olin Library, Mills College

    In addition to her work as an educator, Aurelia Reinhardt worked tirelessly for peace. As early as 1919, she publicly declared herself an advocate for world peace. Although a Republican Party activist, she broke ranks to stand behind President Woodrow Wilson's plan for the League of Nations. A member of more than a dozen peace organizations for the next three decades, she served as a delegate to the founding meetings of the United Nations in San Francisco in 1945. She spoke to dozens of church and community groups about the imperative of peace and the importance of international collaboration, including the value of cultural and educational exchange exemplified by UNESCO.

    While engaged in these peace activities and fulfilling her responsibilities as president of Mills College, Aurelia Reinhardt also took a leadership role in civic groups, including serving as president of the American Association of University Women, as chairman of the department of education for the General Federation of Women's Clubs, and as a member of a number of local governmental commissions. Because of her belief in civil society and its responsibilities, she invariably took the side of those individuals who had no resources, who lacked adequate support, or who had in some other way been marginalized by society. She spoke on behalf of youth during the Depression and for women's equal access to education and professional recognition throughout her life...' http://www.harvardsquarelibrary.org/unitarians/reinhardt.html

    1884: Florence A. Blanchfield born

    "...As superintendent of the Army Nurse Corps from 1943 to 1947, and the first woman to be commissioned in the regular army of the United States, Florence Aby Blanchfield was among the most respected nurse leaders of the twentieth century. Devoting a significant part of her illustrious career to serving her country, Blanchfield's military experiences included meritorious service in World War I and World War II....

    ...Though Blanchfield successively held the ranks of First Lieutenant (1920), Captain (1939), and Lieutenant Colonel (1942), those ranks were relative in nature. Nurses were denied the rights, privileges, and pay enjoyed by male commissioned officers. Appalled by this inequity, Blanchfield struggled to achieve full military rank for nurses. In 1947, the Army-Navy Nurse Act authorized placement of the Army Nurse Corps in the regular army with equal pay and privileges for commissioned nurses. On July 18, 1947, Blanchfield was commissioned as Lieutenant Colonel in the regular army by General Dwight D. Eisenhower.

Following her retirement in 1947, Blanchfield remained active as a consultant and author. She promoted the establishment of specialized courses of study and influenced the development of a program in nursing administration for army nurses. In 1951, she received the Florence Nightingale Medal of the International Red Cross for her service to humanity. Blanchfield died on May 12, 1971, and was buried with full military honors in Arlington National Cemetery. As a final tribute to this extraordinary nurse, the Colonel Florence A. Blanchfield Army Community Hospital at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, was named in her honor and dedicated in September, 1982.

FA Blanchfield PHOTO..." http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/fablanchfield.htm




Edited by Don Quixote - 02-Apr-2012 at 13:54
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  Quote Centrix Vigilis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02-Apr-2012 at 11:52
Eleanor of Aquitaine
Tough ole heifer and a beauty in her youth. As sexist as it may sound.. had she been a man she would potentially have wound up as great as Charlemagne. As it is.. the ole girl did a remarkable job of not only influencing but making history.
 
She might even have been able to exercise her charm and wiles on myself..... successfully?doubtful...but it would have been fun.Wink
"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"

S. T. Friedman




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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-Apr-2012 at 00:07
April 2nd:
1870 - Victoria Woodhull is 1st woman to be nominated for US pres
1935 - Mary Hirsch, becomes 1st woman licensed as a horse trainer

Births:
1545Elisabeth of Valois, third wife of Philip II of Spain (d. 1568)
1614Jahanara Begum Sahib, Imperial Princess, daughter of Shah Jahan and Mumtaz Mahal (d. 1681)
1647Maria Sibylla Merian, German botanist (d. 1717)


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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-Apr-2012 at 02:06
April 3rd:
1913 - British suffragette Emily Pankhurst sentenced to 3 years in jail
1952 - Dutch Queen Juliana speaks to US Congress

Births:
1807Jane Digby, English aristocrat and adventuress (d. 1881)
1954Elisabetta Brusa, Italian composer
2001Sophie Delezio, Australian medical figure

Also:


    1870: Sara Agnes McLaughlin Conboy, and American labor activist, born

    "...She was born Sara Agnes Mclaughlin in Boston, Massachusetts. At the age of 11 she began working in a candy factory, then spent time in a button factory before becoming a skilled weaver. During this period she was married to a mailman named Joseph P. Conboy, but he died two years afterward. While working at a carpet factory in Roxbury, she led a strike that lasted from 1909–10.[1]

Rising to prominence in the labor movement, Sara helped organize the United Textile Workers of America, eventually becoming their secretary-treasurer in 1915. During World War I she was appointed to the Council of National Defense. In 1920 she was the first woman to serve as a United States delegate to the British Trades Union Congress. She was also the first woman to direct a bank in the state of New York,[2] and she served on several government committees.[1]..."http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sara_Agnes_Mclaughlin_Conboy


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