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Sports of your Country

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Bashibozuk View Drop Down
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  Quote Bashibozuk Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Sports of your Country
    Posted: 21-Apr-2006 at 12:14

Turkish Jereed (Javelin)

"A historical cirit figure from early Ottoman period"

Jereed (Cirit, avgan or Gokboru in Turkish) is a traditional sport of Turks played since centuries form the times of Turkic States. Horses were sacred and indispensable for Turks; they were born, grown up, fight, and die on the horse. They even drank Koumiss (kimiz) made of horse's milk.

The Javelin was the main game of Turks during ceremonies and considered to be the oldest of Turkish equestrian sports. It was first introduced to Anatolia in 1071 by the Seljuk ruler Alparslan. Jereed was played as a war game by the Ottomans after 16th century and became the biggest show game of the palace throughout the Ottoman Empire until 19th century. Being a dangerous sport as well, it was banned by the sultan Mahmud II in 1826, but after him was continued to be popular again and spread all over the country. Unfortunately in the last 20-25 years the game is limited only to the Eastern Anatolia, especially played during festivities or weddings in Erzurum, Erzincan, Bayburt, Kars and Sogut. Today apart from Turkey, the Jereed is also played in Iran, Afghanistan, Turkmenistan and other Asian countries were people of Turkish origin live.

Cirit playersThere are two opponent teams in a Jereed game, each formed by 6 or 8 or 12 players, standing on opposite sides of the field marked within a square of from 70 up to 130 meters. There are three "end zones" at each end of the field, each about 6 meters deep, being a team?s waiting area, thus meaning a neutral zone and the opposing team?s throwing area. Each team has its own flag. The horses should be older than four years. A medium height horse is preferred because tall horses are not quick to maneuver, therefore most suitable ones are Arab and Turcoman horses.

The Jereed game begins with introductions and handshakes at center field and a parade by each team with its flags. Then a military music of Janissaries and local music with drums and zurna's start. Riders test the field and their horses, than go back to their section. Jereed players in traditional regional costumes, a remembrance of the Sipahis (horseman) of the Janissaries, mount their local breed horses. With their right hand they hold the first jereed (a one meter-long, 2-3 centimeters in diameter, rubber-tipped stick of turned beech wood or poplar tree) that they'll throw while holding other jereeds in their left hand. One rider from one side rushes forth towards the opposite side getting as close as 30-40 meters and shouts the name of a player from the other team, swinging at him one of his sticks, challenging him to enter the game. Than he gallops back to his corner meanwhile the challenged player follows him and throws a jereed at the player who is running away. Another player from the first team comes out and meets the retreating rider. The player from the second team starts riding quickly to his side and takes his former place. This time his rival chases him and throws a jereed at him. The fast-charging chase game goes on like this. There are two 45-minute periods.

If a player manages to hit his rival with the stick, or outride him, or catch an incoming Cirit in mid-air than he wins points. Instead he will get negative points for actions that might endanger the horse; such as riding out of bounds or striking a horse intentionally, or falling off from his horse, or throwing the stick from inside the neutral zone, or throwing from closer than 5 meters during pursuit. Referees posted at the center line and at each end of the field award both positive and negative points with their flags.

The players make several different defensive maneuvers in order to avoid being hit by their opponents; he leans towards either side of the horse, under the horse?s stomach or even its neck. Some players score more points by hitting his opponent three or four times before that player manages to escape and take his place back in his row. Cirit boys run across the field to retrieve errant throws and deliver them to both sides' "end zones". Even though today jereed tips are rounded rubber and light, sometimes players might be injured if they are hit on the head, eyes or ears. With today's sticks it's very rare but these injuries might even result in a death. If a player dies in the field, he's considered to have lost his life in battle as a martyr and his relatives don?t sue against other player, except that a public case is opened by the court and a legal trial is done anyway. Therefore, if there are any known hostilities amongst players they can be left out of the tournament or put in the same team by the elder people of the village, or by the referees, before the game starts.

At the end of the game, the winner is announced by a council of former jereed players depending on points collected by two teams. Organizers give awards to the winning team and big meals are organized.

Source: http://www.allaboutturkey.com/javelin.htm

       

Today, cirit is very popular game especially in Eastern Turkey, Erzurum, Diyarbakr, and Uak, Konya in the west. Some photos of dadash from Erzurum:

From Erzincan:

Cirit from Cappadocia:

 

 

Garibim, namima Kerem diyorlar,
Asli'mi el almis, harem diyorlar.
Hastayim, derdime verem diyorlar,
Marasli Seyhoglu Satilmis'im ben.
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Gharanai View Drop Down
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  Quote Gharanai Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Apr-2006 at 17:14

Buzkashi

Buzkashi (from Persian Ҙی buzkashi, buz "goat" + kashi "drawing") is a traditional Afghan sport, played from horseback. The name translates literally to "goat grabbing", implying that the game originated in the ancient practice of horseback goat-nabbing during the times of Aryans. The Aryans were skilled horse-riders who could swoop up a goat while riding a horse at full gallop. The goal of a Buzkashi player is to grab the carcass of a calf, and then get it clear of the other players, or pitch it across a goal line.

Competition is typically fierce, as other players may use any force short of tripping the horse in order to thwart scoring attempts (though the use of knives or guns is discouraged). Riders usually wear heavy clothing and head protection to protect themselves from players' whips and boots. Games can last for several days.

The game consists of two main forms: Tudabarai and Qarajai. Tudabarai is considered to be the simpler form of the game; in this style, the goal is simply to grab the calf and move in any direction until clear of the other players. In Qarajai, players must carry the carcass around a flag or marker at one end of the field, and then throw it into a scoring circle at the other end.

The calf in a Buzkashi game is normally beheaded, disemboweled and its limbs cut off, then soaked in cold water for 24 hours before play to toughen it. Occasionally sand is packed into the carcass to give it extra weight. Players may not strap the calf to their bodies or saddles. Though goats are used when no calf is available, calves are less likely to fall apart during the game.

Serious Buzkashi players train intensively for years, and many of the masters (called chapandaz) are over forty years old. Playing well also requires specially trained horses that know to stop still when a rider is thrown, and to gallop forcefully when their rider gets hold of the calf. These horses can sell for as much as $US 2,500.

A game of Buzkashi is featured in an early scene of Rambo III.

  • The game is the core and subject of a novel by French Novelist Joseph Kessel titled Les Cavaliers (aka Horsemen) as well as of the film of the same title featuring Omar Sharif
  • The game is also a key element in the book Caravans by James Michener and the film of the same name staring Anthony Quinn. A scene from the film featuring the King of Afghanistan watching a game is in fact Mohammed Zahir Shah. The whole sequence of the game being witnessed by the king was filmed on the Kabul Golf course where the national championships were played at the time the film was made.

(http://www.answers.com/topic/buzkashi?method=8)

 



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Ollios View Drop Down
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  Quote Ollios Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-Apr-2013 at 03:13
Ellerin Kabe'si var,
Benim Kabem İnsandır
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  Quote Sixteen String Jack Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-Apr-2013 at 12:13
The best known English sport is football, but it's pointless for me to tell everybody about that, because nowadays almost everybody else plays it, too.
I could tell you about England's official national sport, cricket, but I'll end up confusing people.
 
Big smile


Edited by Sixteen String Jack - 16-Apr-2013 at 12:15
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  Quote yomud Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-Apr-2013 at 15:55
horse riding ofc horse riding is sports of turkmens











Edited by yomud - 16-Apr-2013 at 15:59
yomud are free people
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  Quote Qaradag Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18-Apr-2013 at 13:09
Çövkən




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  Quote Nick1986 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Apr-2013 at 20:35

This gentlemens sport isn't very interesting to watch, but great fun to play
Me Grimlock not nice Dino! Me bash brains!
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  Quote Baal Melqart Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Apr-2013 at 13:33


It's not a exactly a sport but a sort of traditional spectacle called ''Tbourida'' which you could translate as ''the shooting of gun powder''.





It's funny that almost everyone posted something that has to do with horses!


Timidi mater non flet
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  Quote red clay Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Apr-2013 at 16:16
Halfball, boxball, Hoseball.  All "Street Sports".  See following-
 
 
 
"Arguing with someone who hates you or your ideas, is like playing chess with a pigeon. No matter what move you make, your opponent will walk all over the board and scramble the pieces".
Unknown.
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  Quote red clay Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Apr-2013 at 17:34
 
As long as some here are into horses, I'll through one at ya,  Barrel Racing.  There are a few men who participate, but for the most part the riders are women.  I'm having problems loading pics, as soon as I can I'll post more.
The breed used is almost always the Quarter Horse.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
"Arguing with someone who hates you or your ideas, is like playing chess with a pigeon. No matter what move you make, your opponent will walk all over the board and scramble the pieces".
Unknown.
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  Quote Centrix Vigilis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Apr-2013 at 22:12
Beer drinking.

Pictures of it everywhere.

The young wannbes are usually gone in an hour. The serious and dedicated, experienced ole timers can hang for weeks.
"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"

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Pilger's law: 'If it's been officially denied, then it's probably true'

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  Quote Ollios Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Apr-2013 at 04:24
Matrak: Ottoman game which was created for combat practise. 

Ellerin Kabe'si var,
Benim Kabem İnsandır
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  Quote red clay Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Apr-2013 at 13:42
Originally posted by Centrix Vigilis

Beer drinking.

Pictures of it everywhere.

The young wannbes are usually gone in an hour. The serious and dedicated, experienced ole timers can hang for weeks.
 
 
That isn't uniquely American, and compared to the Germans, most Americans are amateurs. Wink
"Arguing with someone who hates you or your ideas, is like playing chess with a pigeon. No matter what move you make, your opponent will walk all over the board and scramble the pieces".
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  Quote TITAN_ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Apr-2013 at 08:00
An ancient sport.... dating back to 1200 BC or earlier:



αἰὲν ἀριστεύειν
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“Ever to Excel“
From Homer's Iliad (8th century BC).
Motto of the University of St Andrews (founded 1410), the Edinburgh Academy (founded 1824) and others.
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  Quote red clay Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Apr-2013 at 12:32
This is the Dad Vail Regatta on the Schuykyll, and Boat House Row.
 
 
 
 
 
"Arguing with someone who hates you or your ideas, is like playing chess with a pigeon. No matter what move you make, your opponent will walk all over the board and scramble the pieces".
Unknown.
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