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English Monarchs.

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  Quote King John Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: English Monarchs.
    Posted: 19-Jul-2008 at 19:45
Originally posted by J.M.Finegold


Originally posted by Infidel

What about Edward, the longshanks?


Which Edwards was this?  I thought he was Edwards III.


Edward I was the Edward know as the Longshanks. He is the first Edward after the Norman Conquest and hence Edward I, since numbering started with the Normans.

My vote would be Henry II, since it is during his reign that the State of England started to arise. The Norman Conquest really didn't change much in English institutions until Henry II who had to reassert the royal prerogative after the chaotic reign of Stephen.
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  Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Jul-2008 at 20:35
Originally posted by King John

...after the chaotic reign of Stephen.
 
And/or Matilda. Or Maud.  Ermm


Edited by gcle2003 - 19-Jul-2008 at 20:36
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  Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Jul-2008 at 13:06
Yeah gcle the guy u mentioned may well be interesting but if u did a survay of 1000 people off the street how many would have heard of him, to be great there need to be people to acknowledge that greatness, I am sure the litterary and media coverage recived by Henry VIII is far greater than augustas the strong, whatmore it is the amount of people Henry VIII has made intrested in history, as well as his actions in life and the coverage he has recived in death which combine to make him great    
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  Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Jul-2008 at 14:27

The question as I remember was what other figure would be so well remembered as Henry VIII for the same sort of reason - i.e. the same sort of reason for which Clinton will be long remembered, or Edward VIII and Charles II in England.

If anyone at all has heard of Augustus (outside Poland and Saxony maybe) it's because of the dozen or so known mistresses and the 300-odd reputed children.
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  Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Jul-2008 at 09:26
fair enough i didn't phrase it quite right, that guy sounds cool though 
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  Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Feb-2009 at 01:54
Henry VIII should be credited for his radical Break from Rome, which sets him apart from all the other monarchs. 
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  Quote edgewaters Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Feb-2009 at 04:56

I always like Canute.

His reforms made England the kind of country William would desire to rule.



Edited by edgewaters - 26-Feb-2009 at 04:57
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  Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Feb-2009 at 11:59
But Canute will always be remembered for not being able to control the tide[1], and Henry will always be remembered for having six wives.
 
The gloria mundi is bestowed somewhat haphazardly.
 
[1] At Southampton of course. All other claimants are frauds.
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  Quote pebbles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28-Feb-2009 at 03:36
Originally posted by gcle2003

 
 
Henry will always be remembered for having six wives.
 
 
 
 
Also,Henry VIII founded the Church of Engand as a result of religious & political breakup from Catholic Church in Rome ( now The Vatican ).I thought this has been regarded significant in Britiain history,no Shocked.
 
Would you say it's the root cause led to strong anti-Catholicism ( seen as foreign influence or meddling in internal affairs of England ) among English populace and ruling elites,later extended to N America ( Irish catholics & Italians faced ethnic prejudice in decades past ).At times,it became a tool of political struggle between rival royals in UK.
 
 
 
 
 
 
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  Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28-Feb-2009 at 13:49
Originally posted by pebbles

Originally posted by gcle2003

  
Henry will always be remembered for having six wives.
 
Also,Henry VIII founded the Church of Engand as a result of religious & political breakup from Catholic Church in Rome ( now The Vatican ).
True generally, but the Church of England (certainly Henry's) was Catholic too.
I thought this has been regarded significant in Britiain history,no Shocked.
Depends who is doing the regarding. If he hadn't married six wives they wouldn't be making films and TV series about him. Mind you a significant number of people remember he had eight wives, which comes from mixing up his title with his marriages.
 
Also, apart from that, if he hadn't wanted to divorce his first wife, and if she hadn't been the Emperor's aunt, he probably wouldn't have broken with Rome anyway.
 
Would you say it's the root cause led to strong anti-Catholicism ( seen as foreign influence or meddling in internal affairs of England ) among English populace and ruling elites,later extended to N America ( Irish catholics & Italians faced ethnic prejudice in decades past ).At times,it became a tool of political struggle between rival royals in UK.
 
The English Reformation wasn't anti-Catholic, it was anti-Roman. And in many ways (Dissolution of the Monasteries) mostly secular. The population. like Henry himself, were still strongly Catholic.
 
Later in the century a strong anti-Catholic (Puritan, Calvinist) did arise, and emigrants like the Pilgrim Fathers went west to set up Protestant communities as a result, but what they were objecting to was more immediately Anglo-Catholicism  rather than Roman. I don't think the southern colonies at that time were particularly Protestant: Baptist dominance in the South came much later, and the denomination was never very strong in Britain.
 
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  Quote pikeshot1600 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28-Feb-2009 at 15:58
Just a note on the Pilgrim Fathers going west.  First they had gone to the Netherlands to find their religious freedom among adherents to the Calvinist Reformed Church.  From what I remember of it, that was in the decade between the Dutch truce with Spain and it's expiration in 1621.  When it became obvious that the truce would not be renewed, the Pilgrims left for North America.
 
How much of the decision to leave was practical - the decision to avoid the resumption of war - and how much was perhaps confessional is a question.  When they were not fighting the Habsburgs, the Dutch started to fight among themselves.  They became more intolerant of any deviation from the Reformed Church as the decade of the 1610s progressed, and how foreign Protestants were received might have been an issue.  Or perhaps Puritans didn't like what they found in the Dutch Reformed Church. 
 
By 1619 Confessionalism in the United Provinces was close to tearing the Republic apart.  (Anabaptists and Mennonites were as anathema as Lutherans.  Presbyterians were kind of official Dutchmen though.  Wink )    
 
In any event, once the Pilgrims got to North America, they had their religious freedom, but they wouldn't give it to anyone else who showed up.
 
   
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  Quote Nick1986 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29-Apr-2011 at 20:27
Elizabeth whose defeat of the Spanish safeguarded English Protestantism
Edward I who conquered Wales and brought stability to England after years of civil war
Alfred who resisted the Vikings
Henry V who almost conquered France
James I who gave us our modern English bible
Edward VII for his diplomacy
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-May-2011 at 18:27
Originally posted by Winterhaze13

Who do you scholars think is the greatest British Monarch? I hope that there are alot of Brits in this forum. Soem choices may include: Elizabeth I, queen during the Spanish Armada Incident, his father Henry VIII and his six knives, or is it Queen Victoria whose face was used to sell products?

Personally I consider it to be offensive that on a topic about English Monarchs you ask who do you scholars think is the greatest British Monarch. English and British isn't interchangeable if by British you mean those from Great Britain. Unhappy  
What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.
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