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Astronomy, where to begin?

Printed From: History Community ~ All Empires
Category: General History
Forum Name: Science through the Ages
Forum Discription: Discuss science and its effects on the world…
URL: http://www.allempires.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=23469
Printed Date: 26-Sep-2022 at 19:29
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Topic: Astronomy, where to begin?
Posted By: Justinian
Subject: Astronomy, where to begin?
Date Posted: 07-Feb-2008 at 21:20
I have wanted to educate myself in the field of astronomy for a while now, but my college didn't offer any classes, so I have decided to teach myself.  That being said, what are some good introductory, and intermediate/advanced, books on astronomy?  Online sources are also appreciated.

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"War is a cowardly escape from the problems of peace."--Thomas Mann




Replies:
Posted By: Paul
Date Posted: 07-Feb-2008 at 21:32
Patrick Moore writes the best entry level stuff into Astronomy.
 
He's also presented The Sky at Night on BBC TV for 51 years now. You may find some episodes on You Tube.
 
http://www.banguniverse.com/ - http://www.banguniverse.com/


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Posted By: Goban
Date Posted: 08-Feb-2008 at 15:08
The book "Astronomy Demystified" by Stan Gibilisco. Published my McGraw-Hill, 2003, is a great introductory text. It is really cheap and I actually had it as a required text in an astronomy class. 20 USD on amazon.com (just looked).
 
Also, if you are interested in archaeoastronomy there are tons of bibs available online. I have a few and would certainly point you in the right direction.
 
 
 


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The sharpest spoon in the drawer.


Posted By: Justinian
Date Posted: 08-Feb-2008 at 23:38

Thanks guys.Smile  I'd definitely appreciate you sharing your insights on Archaeoastronomy Goban.  Thats another area that I would like to learn more about.



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"War is a cowardly escape from the problems of peace."--Thomas Mann



Posted By: Suren
Date Posted: 09-Feb-2008 at 01:13
I started with Issac Asimov books when I was a kid. His books are very good for beginners.


Posted By: Goban
Date Posted: 09-Feb-2008 at 03:40
Originally posted by Justinian

Thanks guys.Smile  I'd definitely appreciate you sharing your insights on Archaeoastronomy Goban.  Thats another area that I would like to learn more about.

 
Sure thing. I will go through my bibliographies and pull out some for you (most of it I found surfing the net).
 
Right now, I am studying Kumeyaay peoples and have come across some really interesting stuff regarding their calendar (the Mat'taam) and astronomical beliefs (constellation seasonality, etc).


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The sharpest spoon in the drawer.


Posted By: Northman
Date Posted: 09-Feb-2008 at 20:36
An http://www.allempires.net/forum_posts.asp?TID=17293&KW=stellarium&PID=322006#322006 - old thread here might have your interest, Justinian. Smile

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Posted By: Justinian
Date Posted: 10-Feb-2008 at 02:57
Great link North, once I get more time I'll be downloading that program for sure.  Looks amazing.
 
You guys have been an enormous help, thanks for all the helpful suggestions.Smile


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"War is a cowardly escape from the problems of peace."--Thomas Mann



Posted By: Goban
Date Posted: 11-Feb-2008 at 14:27
Don't think that I forgot about you Justinian Big%20smile
 
Sorry about the delay...


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The sharpest spoon in the drawer.


Posted By: Justinian
Date Posted: 12-Feb-2008 at 08:53
Originally posted by Goban

Don't think that I forgot about you Justinian Big%20smile
 
Sorry about the delay...
No trouble at all, take all the time you need.Smile 


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"War is a cowardly escape from the problems of peace."--Thomas Mann



Posted By: Goban
Date Posted: 13-Feb-2008 at 14:52
Probably the best bib I have is a tentative syllabus from Dr. Stephen McClusky's Man and the Cosmos class from 2004 (West Virginia University). The other's are directly from the internet but, like an idiot, I didn't copy the addresses on my hard copies to find them again.
 
If you want, you can PM me an email address and I will scan and send you copies. Also, American Antiquity has some good articlesas well... If you have access to JSTOR there is a lot of good material.  


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The sharpest spoon in the drawer.


Posted By: Justinian
Date Posted: 13-Feb-2008 at 21:32
Okay, cool.

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"War is a cowardly escape from the problems of peace."--Thomas Mann



Posted By: rider
Date Posted: 15-Feb-2008 at 20:41
Astronomy rules, no question in it...

I've read works by Estonian astronomers and some school-books. Also mostly self educating.


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Posted By: Peteratwar
Date Posted: 15-Apr-2008 at 11:05
Try looking to see if you have any local amateur Astronomy clubs. Libraries may help here


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 30-Sep-2008 at 03:01
Originally posted by Justinian

I have wanted to educate myself in the field of astronomy for a while now, but my college didn't offer any classes, so I have decided to teach myself.  That being said, what are some good introductory, and intermediate/advanced, books on astronomy?  Online sources are also appreciated.


for an introductory textbook, try foundations of astronomy by michael seeds, lonely planets and venus revealed by david grinspoon, universe: stars and galaxies by freedman and kaufmann.


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