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Egyptian origins (race/ethnicity)

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  Quote MKGlouisville Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Egyptian origins (race/ethnicity)
    Posted: 20-Nov-2011 at 08:08
Originally posted by Don Quixote

Ancient Egyptian language shows the closest relationship  to Semitic, Berber and Beja:
"...According to Loprieno4, Ancient Egyptian shows thë closest relationship to Semitic, Berber and Beja, and more distant relationship to the rest of Cushitic and Chadic. ..."
"...The Ancient Egyptian language represents an autonomous branch of the Afro-Asiatic or Hamito-Semitic phylum, one of the most widespread language families in the world.The individual branches of the Afro-Asiatic phylum are :
-Ancient Egyptian ;
-Semitic languages including Eastern Semitic (Akkadian), Northwest Semitic (Canaaite, Hebrew, Ugaritic, Aramaic. Phœnician} and Southwest Semitic (Arabic, South Arabian and Ethiopic) ;-
-Berber languages (or Libyco-Berber) ;
- Cushitic languages (i.e. among others Beja, Agao, Somali, etc.) ;
- Chadic languages (i.e. among others Hausa)...."
...http://ema.revues.org/index1025.html


Do you even know where Afro-Asiatic originated and where it spread to? On the very first page of this thread leading linguistic and African historian Christopher Ehret, thouroughly demonstrates through numerous lines of lingustic and archarological evidence that the origins of ancient Egypt lay with the Nilotic Saharan populations and Afro-Asiatic Sub Saharan East Africans. It is these populations whom the ancient Egyptians most closely resembled both biologically and culturally. Below from the OXFORD ENCYCLOPEDIA OF ANCIENT EGYPT, in regards to the cultural affinities of the ancient Egyptians:

"The evidence also points to linkages to other northeast African peoples, not coincidentally approximating the modern range of languages closely related to Egyptian in the Afro-Asiatic group (formerly called Hamito-Semetic). These linguistic similarities place ancient Egyptian in a close relationship with languages spoken today as far west as Chad, and as far south as Somalia. A widespread northeastern African cultural assemblage, including distinctive multiple barbed harpoons and pottery decorated with dotted wavy line patterns, appears during the early Neolithic (also known as the Aqualithic, a reference to the mild climate of the Sahara at this time).

Archaeological evidence also strongly supports an African origin. Saharan and Sudanese rock art from this time resembles early Egyptian iconography. Strong connections between Nubian (Sudanese) and Egyptian material culture continue in later Neolithic Badarian culture of Upper Egypt. Similarities include black-topped wares, vessels with characteristic ripple-burnished surfaces, a special tulip-shaped vessel with incised andwhite-filled decoration, palettes, and harpoons...

Other ancient Egyptian practices show strong similarities to modern African cultures including divine kingship, the use of headrests, body art, circumcision, and male coming-of-age rituals, all suggesting an African substratum or foundation for Egyptian civilization.. "

Source: Donald Redford (2001) The Oxford encyclopedia of ancient Egypt,Volume 3. Oxford University Press. p. 28

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  Quote MKGlouisville Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2011 at 08:33
Originally posted by TheAlaniDragonRising

The reason for this isn't that you are wrong that much, it is because the findings you have shown heavily relies on southern Egypt for the findings you're trying to put over,


The reason why southern Egypt tends to be the focal point of most studies focusing on early Egyptian state formation or society is because it was southern Egypt where the vast majority of the Egyptian populace resided and is also where Dynastic Egyptian culture originated. Lower Egypt and the Delta in particular did not begin to become heavily populated until the after the Late period when numerous foreign invasions have been noted.

As for the ancient population of Egypt as a whole and the likeness modern day Egyptians have with them now, I would ask you about ancient Egyptian paintings on walls and how the likenesses are like those of the people now.


Just about every Egyptologist denounces the usage of ancient Egyptian artwork to make biological inferences about the ancient population. That's not to say that one couldn't use certain examples to illustrate a point, but when some people attempt to rely solely on this type of evidence is when it becomes a problem. Biological evidence on the other hand consistently finds that the ancient Egyptians as a whole have closest biologically to ancient Nubians, Kushites, Saharans and modern Horn African populations. This is why I found my comparison of Egyptian artwork with modern day Horn African populations to be appropriate.

If the ancient Egyptians weren't a mixed population, then when did they become the mix that they are, taking into consideration the paintings too?


I posted a peer reviewed article on page one or two, which states that by the Late Dynastic period there was a biological distinction between them and Pre-Early Dynastic Egyptians, and that this was due to significant migration and mixing with Mediterranean populations. One recent study actually states that Late Dynastic samples were so biologically distinct from earlier samples that they cannot be considered representative of the typical Egyptian from earlier periods:

Previous studies have compared biological relationships between Egyptians and other populations, mostly using the Howells global cranial data set. In the current study, by contrast, the biological relationships within a series of temporally-successive cranial samples are assessed.

The data consist of 55 cranio-facial variables from 418 adult Egyptian individuals, from six periods, ranging in date from c. 5000 to 1200 BC. These were compared with the 111 Late Period crania (c. 600-350 BC) from the Howells sample. Principal Component and Canonical Discriminant Function Analysis were undertaken, on both pooled and single sex samples.

The results suggest a level of local population continuity exists within the earlier Egyptian populations, but that this was in association with some change in population structure, reflecting small-scale immigration and admixture with new groups. Most dramatically, the results also indicate that the Egyptian series from Howells global data set are morphologically distinct from the Predynastic and Early Dynastic Nile Valley samples (especially in cranial vault shape and height), and thus show that this sample cannot be considered to be a typical Egyptian series. –Zakrewski (2004) “Intra-population and temporal variation in ancient Egyptian crania.”
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  Quote medenaywe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2011 at 08:53
Your data are obsolete cause of DNA compared data with DNA inside ancient graveyards:population inside the empire was discussed here,pharaohs had changed till civilization existence.Did those data compare with
DNA of people in Med sea area MK?
P.S.
Barak Husein Obama is "pharaoh" with part of Somalian blood  that does  not means  USA  people are  all
Somalians.Big smile 


Edited by medenaywe - 26-Nov-2011 at 16:14
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2011 at 14:49
Originally posted by MKGlouisville

Originally posted by TheAlaniDragonRising

The reason for this isn't that you are wrong that much, it is because the findings you have shown heavily relies on southern Egypt for the findings you're trying to put over,


The reason why southern Egypt tends to be the focal point of most studies focusing on early Egyptian state formation or society is because it was southern Egypt where the vast majority of the Egyptian populace resided and is also where Dynastic Egyptian culture originated. Lower Egypt and the Delta in particular did not begin to become heavily populated until the after the Late period when numerous foreign invasions have been noted.

As for the ancient population of Egypt as a whole and the likeness modern day Egyptians have with them now, I would ask you about ancient Egyptian paintings on walls and how the likenesses are like those of the people now.


Just about every Egyptologist denounces the usage of ancient Egyptian artwork to make biological inferences about the ancient population. That's not to say that one couldn't use certain examples to illustrate a point, but when some people attempt to rely solely on this type of evidence is when it becomes a problem. Biological evidence on the other hand consistently finds that the ancient Egyptians as a whole have closest biologically to ancient Nubians, Kushites, Saharans and modern Horn African populations. This is why I found my comparison of Egyptian artwork with modern day Horn African populations to be appropriate.

If the ancient Egyptians weren't a mixed population, then when did they become the mix that they are, taking into consideration the paintings too?


I posted a peer reviewed article on page one or two, which states that by the Late Dynastic period there was a biological distinction between them and Pre-Early Dynastic Egyptians, and that this was due to significant migration and mixing with Mediterranean populations. One recent study actually states that Late Dynastic samples were so biologically distinct from earlier samples that they cannot be considered representative of the typical Egyptian from earlier periods:

Previous studies have compared biological relationships between Egyptians and other populations, mostly using the Howells global cranial data set. In the current study, by contrast, the biological relationships within a series of temporally-successive cranial samples are assessed.

The data consist of 55 cranio-facial variables from 418 adult Egyptian individuals, from six periods, ranging in date from c. 5000 to 1200 BC. These were compared with the 111 Late Period crania (c. 600-350 BC) from the Howells sample. Principal Component and Canonical Discriminant Function Analysis were undertaken, on both pooled and single sex samples.

The results suggest a level of local population continuity exists within the earlier Egyptian populations, but that this was in association with some change in population structure, reflecting small-scale immigration and admixture with new groups. Most dramatically, the results also indicate that the Egyptian series from Howells global data set are morphologically distinct from the Predynastic and Early Dynastic Nile Valley samples (especially in cranial vault shape and height), and thus show that this sample cannot be considered to be a typical Egyptian series. –Zakrewski (2004) “Intra-population and temporal variation in ancient Egyptian crania.”

There you go, MKGlouisville, the second you admit it is focused on a smaller area than the whole with other areas missed you are unable to prove the people weren't mixed.Shift+R improves the quality of this image. Shift+A improves the quality of all images on this page.

Denouncing the artwork is one thing, explaining then why a black population might paint themselves as white is another.Shift+R improves the quality of this image. Shift+A improves the quality of all images on this page.

If you are showing a clear distinction between people of time periods, then it would help to also show their contributions too. Shift+R improves the quality of this image. Shift+A improves the quality of all images on this page.
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2011 at 14:51
Originally posted by MKGlouisville

Originally posted by Don Quixote

Ancient Egyptian language shows the closest relationship  to Semitic, Berber and Beja:
"...According to Loprieno4, Ancient Egyptian shows thë closest relationship to Semitic, Berber and Beja, and more distant relationship to the rest of Cushitic and Chadic. ..."
"...The Ancient Egyptian language represents an autonomous branch of the Afro-Asiatic or Hamito-Semitic phylum, one of the most widespread language families in the world.The individual branches of the Afro-Asiatic phylum are :
-Ancient Egyptian ;
-Semitic languages including Eastern Semitic (Akkadian), Northwest Semitic (Canaaite, Hebrew, Ugaritic, Aramaic. Phœnician} and Southwest Semitic (Arabic, South Arabian and Ethiopic) ;-
-Berber languages (or Libyco-Berber) ;
- Cushitic languages (i.e. among others Beja, Agao, Somali, etc.) ;
- Chadic languages (i.e. among others Hausa)...."
...http://ema.revues.org/index1025.html


Do you even know where Afro-Asiatic originated and where it spread to? On the very first page of this thread leading linguistic and African historian Christopher Ehret, thouroughly demonstrates through numerous lines of lingustic and archarological evidence that the origins of ancient Egypt lay with the Nilotic Saharan populations and Afro-Asiatic Sub Saharan East Africans. It is these populations whom the ancient Egyptians most closely resembled both biologically and culturally. Below from the OXFORD ENCYCLOPEDIA OF ANCIENT EGYPT, in regards to the cultural affinities of the ancient Egyptians:

"The evidence also points to linkages to other northeast African peoples, not coincidentally approximating the modern range of languages closely related to Egyptian in the Afro-Asiatic group (formerly called Hamito-Semetic). These linguistic similarities place ancient Egyptian in a close relationship with languages spoken today as far west as Chad, and as far south as Somalia. A widespread northeastern African cultural assemblage, including distinctive multiple barbed harpoons and pottery decorated with dotted wavy line patterns, appears during the early Neolithic (also known as the Aqualithic, a reference to the mild climate of the Sahara at this time).

Archaeological evidence also strongly supports an African origin. Saharan and Sudanese rock art from this time resembles early Egyptian iconography. Strong connections between Nubian (Sudanese) and Egyptian material culture continue in later Neolithic Badarian culture of Upper Egypt. Similarities include black-topped wares, vessels with characteristic ripple-burnished surfaces, a special tulip-shaped vessel with incised andwhite-filled decoration, palettes, and harpoons...

Other ancient Egyptian practices show strong similarities to modern African cultures including divine kingship, the use of headrests, body art, circumcision, and male coming-of-age rituals, all suggesting an African substratum or foundation for Egyptian civilization.. "

Source: Donald Redford (2001) The Oxford encyclopedia of ancient Egypt,Volume 3. Oxford University Press. p. 28


Where Afro-Asiatic originated is still an controversial question /which I had argued to death and back before and know all the arguments in both directions, so don't bother to post more blind quotes/, and anyway has nothing to do with anything - Ancient Egyptian is closest to Berber, not to the Nilo-Saharan languages, which means it developed in closer relationship to Berber than to Nilo-Saharan. The point of origin of Afroasiatic doesn't matter for the needs of this thread.
Of course there is African sunstratum in the foundations of the Egyptian civilization, I talk about mixed ethncity, which includes the African substratum.
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2011 at 15:02
Originally posted by MKGlouisville

Word of advice Don Quixote, the next time you copy and paste and entire argument word for word from Anthroscape, you should read the entire thread first. If you did then you would have seen where "Racialreality" was beaten so bad in the debate that in an act of cowardice he banned his primary opponent from the forum in the middle of the debate. But since you took the easy way out I will do the same:







Now if you would really like to have an original debate on the biological affinities of the ancient Egyptians than we do so. Otherwise your copied and pasted talking points will be met with the same talking points that thoroughly debunk them. Fair enough?



I'm absolutely not interested who beat who when - I'm after studies and their results, and get them from where I can find them - those that I post can be followed, unlike the blind ones that I see posted here and cannot be followed at all. I'm not interested in copy-pasted pages that I cannot follow, so don't bother, I had seen plenty of those in certain sites with certain orientation. I'm not promoting any "Arian claims' so lay those insinuations off. The studies I posted don't promote "Arian claims" they state facts, so it's not fair enough to counter them with "debunking Arian claims" - such claims had not been made by me or the studies I posted.

There is data that shows the affinity of the ancient Egyptians with sub-Saharans, as well with other populations, Indian and European included /though the Middle East/ and the only way to reconcile all the available data is to suppose mixed origin. There is no single ethnicity in a melting pot, no matter if we talk about Egypt, the Balkans, or say the US. Anyone who is rooting for a single ethnic character of the population of most ancient migration corridor is wrong in principle.




Edited by Don Quixote - 20-Nov-2011 at 15:27
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2011 at 15:06
Originally posted by Ancient Dravidian

Europeans again (Scandinavians! LOL ).. very funny study indeed.. could you cite a serious study, too

Studies don't lie, Dravidian. Besides, if it's OK the Egyptians to had have affinities with Indians, why not with Scandinavians? People move all the time in all possible directions, and we all all one big mix.
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2011 at 15:14
Originally posted by medenaywe

Your data are obsolete cause of DNA compared data with DNA inside ancient graveyards:population inside the empire was discussed here,pharaohs had changed till civilization existence.Did those data compare with
DNA of people in Med sea area MK?
P.S.
Barak Husein Obama is "pharaoh" with part of Somalian blood  that does  not means  USA  people are  all
Somalians.Big smile 

Good parallel, IMHO, the US is a modern melting pot while Egypt the most ancient one.
Btw, congrats on becoming a modSmile.
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  Quote medenaywe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2011 at 15:23
We are doing well people just avoid quotes and use the name of your speaking companion cause other way
trolling we are!MK try not to use this!
P.S.Thanks Don,here I am for you people!Me and my Cheshire Cat smileBig smile.Wink
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  Quote MKGlouisville Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2011 at 15:46
Originally posted by medenaywe

Your data are obsolete cause of DNA compared data with DNA inside ancient graveyards:population inside the empire was discussed here,pharaohs had changed till civilization existence.Did those data compare with
DNA of people in Med sea area MK?
P.S.
Barak Husein Obama is "pharaoh" with part of Somalian blood  that does  not means  USA  people are  all
Somalians.Big smile 


Before you hurl insults at other people, please master the English language first. I've reframed from addressing many of your post, due your completely butchered sentence structure and the fact that your thought process is jumping from corner to corner. I generally don't insult a persons grammar, but your post take the cake!
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2011 at 15:52
How rude! This is an international forum, with members from all kinds of countries! Not everyone was raised with English and it's matter of common decency not to make such remarks. Any of the second-language English speakers here knows at least one more language, some more than one, and this is a plus, not a minus by any standard. Anyone who put in the effort to use any foreign language is to be respected, nay, admired for that!
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  Quote MKGlouisville Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2011 at 16:01
Originally posted by TheAlaniDragonRising

There you go, MKGlouisville, the second you admit it is focused on a smaller area than the whole with other areas missed you are unable to prove the people weren't mixed.


No not necessarily! I've explained to you some of the reasons why studies tend to focus of early southern Egyptians than those of the north in my previous post. One reason that I left out is the sheer lack of archaeological material and physical remains in northern Egypt which date back to the Pre-Dynastic and Early periods. That is not to say however that no research has been conducted on the limited sample size already available. Below are the results of limb proportion ratios of Pre-Dynastic Lower Egyptians and it's comparison to other populations:

"sample populations available from northern Egypt from before the 1st Dynasty (Merimda, Maadi and Wadi Digla) turn out to be significantly different from sample populations from early Palestine and Byblos, suggesting a lack of common ancestors over a long time. If there was a south-north cline variation along the Nile valley it did not, from this limited evidence, continue smoothly on into southern Palestine. The limb-length proportions of males from the Egyptian sites group them with Africans rather than with Europeans." (Barry Kemp, "Ancient Egypt Anatomy of a Civilisation. (2005) Routledge. p. 52-60)


As you can see the biological affinities of early Lower Egyptians are also with more southerly tropical African populations and not with Near Eastern or Europeans, which the author suggest is due to a lack of common ancestry between indigenous northern Egyptians and the latter mentioned populations.

Denouncing the artwork is one thing, explaining then why a black population might paint themselves as white is another.


Excuse me?







While I don't doubt that populations whom would generally be referred to 'Caucasian' would become present in Late Dynastic Egypt (due to invasions and migration), to say that the ancient Egyptian depicted themselves as "white" is simply not true. 
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  Quote Nick1986 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2011 at 16:05
MK, please don't resort to insults. Such behavior is not acceptable here
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  Quote medenaywe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2011 at 16:05
I miss one You above...Will be more careful next time.Let us talk about topic not about us.Forum is place where people have exchanged ideas and concepts not a religious scripts psalm after all of us will have to say:Aleluya!Give us arguments contra my broken English words here!But no trolling please!Other way will post you on wall.


 
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2011 at 16:14
MKGlouisville, when you restrict a survey to a smaller grouping you can hardly class it as a representative of any more than that smaller group. Where is your survey on the whole population showing the same results as you have?

Repeating what you have found on a section of the population won't make it any more realist than when you put it forward previously. It still lacks the credibility of a survey on the whole.

Oh please, surely cherry picking pictures which can be followed so easily by those of Egyptians of other colours is pushing it a little too far.
What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.
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  Quote MKGlouisville Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2011 at 16:19
Originally posted by Don Quixote

Where Afro-Asiatic originated is still an controversial question


No it's not controversial as it's almost unanimously agreed upon by almost every linguist that it's origins were somewhere in eastern Africa. I'm willing to bet that you cannot cite a single linguist within the last decade who attributes it's origins from outside of Africa. On the other hand here is a map from a recent 2009 study on it's origins and migration:



Neolithic in Northern Africa. Approximately 14 kya, climatic changes associated with the end of the Last Glacial Maximum resulted in regions around the world becoming more favorable to human exploitation. Northern Africa is one such region, and ~13 kya, novel technologies (“Natufian”) thought to be the immediate precursor to agricultural technologies emerged and were associated with semisedentary subsistence and population expansions in northeastern Africa (35). Moreover, before the emergence of the Natufian styled artifacts, the archaeological record includes two artifact styles, the “Geometric Kebaran” and the “Mushabian” associated with Middle Eastern and Northern African populations, respectively (35). The archaeological evidence suggests the peoples using these assemblages interacted for well over 1,000 years, and linguistic evidence suggests that the peoples using these assemblages may have spoken some form of proto-Afroasiatic (35, 36). Although the origins of the Afroasiatic language family remain contentious, linguistic data generally support a model in which the Afroasiatic language family arose in Northern Africa >10 kya (36). Moreover, analyses of the Cushitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family suggest that proto-Cushitic arose and diversified at least 7 kya, and this likely took place in Ethiopia (37). Intriguingly, the origin and diversification of proto-Afroasiatic is consistent with the spread of intensive plant collection in the archaeological record, and some interpret this pattern to represent a model in which proto-Afroasiatic speakers developed the novel subsistence technology resulting in the expansion and spread of their Afroasiatic descendants in the region (37). Some examples of the relevant linguistic data include reconstructed Chadic root words for “porridge” and “sorghum” and the Cushitic root words for “grain” and “wheat” (37). Because these and other root words are present in many of the Chadic and Cushitic languages, it is assumed that they were present in the proto-Chadic and proto-Cushitic languages and therefore must be as old as those proto-languages (37). The genetic data appear to be consistent with the archaeological and linguistic data indicative of extensive population interactions between North African and Middle Eastern populations. A recent NRY study explores the distribution of haplogroups in a sample of African, Middle Eastern, and European males (38). Whereas a subclade of haplogroup E (M35) appears to have arisen in eastern Africa over 20 kya and subsequently spread to the Middle East and Europe, haplogroup J (M267) appears to have arisen in the Middle East over 20 kya and subsequently spread into northern Africa (38). A recent study of genomewide autosomal microsatellite markers reports that Middle Eastern and African samples share the highest number of alleles that are also absent in other non-African samples, consistent with bidirectional gene flow (1). In addition, a recent study of domestic goat mtDNA and NRY variation reports similar findings as well as evidence of trade along the Strait of Gibraltar (39).


http://www.pnas.org/content/107/suppl.2/8931.full

Ancient Egyptian is closest to Berber, not to the Nilo-Saharan languages, which means it developed in closer relationship to Berber than to Nilo-Saharan.


Your claims are baseless and goes against mainstream research. Aside from the common sense fact that both languages are Afro-Asiatic the reason why Berber languages are close to ancient Egyptian is due to the fact that both Berber and Semitic languages came into existence afterward from the same migrating Northeast African population.


Full article on page one

Biologically however Nubians (Nilo Saharan speakers) and ancient Egyptians are of the same origin, as has been demonstrated by their overlapping biological and cultural affinities stretching back to Pre-Dynastic times.

Of course there is African sunstratum in the foundations of the Egyptian civilization, I talk about mixed ethncity, which includes the African substratum.


What biological evidence concludes that the ancient Egyptians have been "mixed" since Pre-Dynastic times? I have presented numerous lines of evidence confirming that the original ancient Egyptians were a mixture of Sub Saharan East African and Nilotic Africans from the ancient Sahara, which would make them black originally. 
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  Quote MKGlouisville Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2011 at 16:29
Originally posted by Don Quixote

those that I post can be followed, unlike the blind ones that I see posted here and cannot be followed at all.


The peer reviewed articles that I have posted for the most part have been posted in full and cited to the page number of the journal, therefore there is nothing being withheld from you or others.
 
I'm not interested in copy-pasted pages that I cannot follow, so don't bother


Well what would have been more honest on your behalf was to give a link to the thread on Anthroscape in which you copy and pasted another individuals entire argument.

I'm not promoting any "Arian claims' so lay those insinuations off. The studies I posted don't promote "Arian claims" they state facts,


While their finding aren't necessarily untrue, the methods in which they used to demonstrate population relatedness are superficial. Who seriously asserts that both ancient Egyptians AND Nubians (who group closest to one another) had closer biological affinities to French , English and German Europeans? Seriously!

On the dental study referenced in that thread Racial Reality's main opponent provided a study which confirmed that due to dietary changes population on the Nile Valley began to display reduced tooth sizes, which is evidence that those earlier studies could not include in with their findings.  
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  Quote MKGlouisville Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2011 at 16:33
Originally posted by Don Quixote

How rude! This is an international forum, with members from all kinds of countries!


No referring to the OP as a "troll" is RUDE!

Not everyone was raised with English


Likewise, I'm just reminding him of that fact. Don't stand in the kitchen if you can't stand the heat. If you're going to blatantly insult me,  then don't expect for me to reply back kindly to you.
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2011 at 16:36
MKGlouisville, I have found something you might find to be interesting on diversity in ancient Egypt. This wasn't the only one, but I guess one is enough in this case. http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1750752/posts
What a handsome figure of a dragon. No wonder I fall madly in love with the Alani Dragon now, the avatar, it's a gorgeous dragon picture.
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medenaywe View Drop Down
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  Quote medenaywe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Nov-2011 at 16:46
I like this one:"They all identified themselves as Egyptians," Elias said. "These are people. You can't slice them up like they're chocolate cake or vanilla cake."Therefore we share similarities inside our languages.
We had lived once together as it was shown on pictures.Why does it scares you?!?

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