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Kurdish ancestry: what is true, and what isn't?

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  Quote Putty19 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Kurdish ancestry: what is true, and what isn't?
    Posted: 14-Jan-2011 at 10:26
Originally posted by Xorto

 
Originally posted by Putty19

 

Based on this chart from the study, the Kurds fall somewhere between Armenians and Iranians (Persians):

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_Ish7688voT0/TR8ox_MI6qI/AAAAAAAADIE/zEcyBpR0U8s/s1600/MDS1600.png

Their pull toward the Persians means the South Asian percentage in Kurds is probably somewhere around 5% and greater than Armenian who have less than 1%, if you want to argue with science, I simply won't discuss this matter with you anymore since you clearly have not read much about it.

So putty you  Source faker. And you expect from us that we get you serious if you use a Fst distance map were IRAQI Kurds are used, who also stay geographically between Iran and Turkey, as a representation for the kurds as whole? The iraqi Kurds stay on this map between Georgians and Northiranians I highly doubt that the Northiranians have more Contact to Southeastasian Populations than any other group of Westasia. Here is the table for this Fst Map


Perhaps you should learn how to read first before you go on calling me a faker, I did point out that these were Iraqi Kurds, the initial argument is your other biras kept on egging the whole Scythian argument and pointing to Y-DNA for evidence, I showed them that ancient DNA remains from Scythian skeletons showed 90% haplogroup R1a1 and 10% haplogroup C3, they went on to say that haplogroup R1a1 is more in Anatolian Kurds, well guess what, in the study where 87 Anatolian Kurdish samples were tested, 12.7% R1a1 was found among them, while among the Iraqi Kurds there was 11.6%, pretty much the same frequency, not to mention that not every R1a1 is of Indo-Iranian heritage because the haplogroup itself is very old and already existed in other places like India and the Middle East.

To boil down what I was saying, the Kurds are mostly a native West Asian population and if I were to take a wild guess on their Iranian heritage, it would likely be somewhere around 10% give or take.


I think you didn´t understand your own sources very well. The Cimmerians lived on the Cimmerian Bosporus this was just some Miles away from their Homeland north of Black sea. I don´t know how the hell you could read out Scythians being from Southcentral by this


"Ardys took Priene and made war upon Miletus. In his reign the Cimmerians, driven from their homes by the nomads of Scythia, entered Asia and captured Sardis, all but the citadel."

The Iranic speaking groups developed North of the Caucasus this is a almost proven fact they later migrated to South Central Asia. And why should Heredotus call the Scythians of East Saceans while calling the ones from Black Sea Scythians if the real Scythians came from Central? Your hole idea is based on OLD researches. Today we know that the Scythians did not developed in Central Asia.


I see you missed out the part where Herodutos pointed out how the Scythians left their homeland due to wars with the Massagetae, and I showed you on the map where these Massagetae lived (Central Asia), I'll post the map again and circle it for you:



Edited by Putty19 - 14-Jan-2011 at 10:27
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  Quote Ince Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Jan-2011 at 19:05
Regradless of how much of genetic impact the Iranic tribes had, the Iranic heritage of the Kurds also includes culture and language.  Persians,Lors,Gilaks,Talysh,Ossetians are all in the same boat and they are not less iranic then east iranians, because they have more mixed genetic ancestory.  

Most of the important historical points of Iranian history happend in West Iran and by west iranians, and their descendants live in West Iranians.  Before Fars, Persians were around lake urmia and they would of also had incroperated some of the local population before even moving to Fars.   The Medes, Achaemenids, Parthians, even the Sassanids were all mostly mixed and they identified themselves as Aryans and even the Sassanids were the first to name Iran(Eran) meaning the "Land of Aryans".

Anyway I still don't think that testing 87 Kurds out of 20+ Million Anatolian Kurds is a good indication it would be the same on a larger tests.  For all we know the people they had tested all came from the same region.

No nation is geneticaly pure or carry 100% linage of the people that established the identiy and language,  Look at Northern Europeans they are mainly all R1b and I and yet Eastern Indo-Europeans do not carry that linage.  Humans have  tendancy to mix and incroperate other people.  


Edited by Ince - 14-Jan-2011 at 19:16
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  Quote MediaWarLord Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Jan-2011 at 20:42

Originally posted by Putty19

To boil down what I was saying, the Kurds are mostly a native West Asian population and if I were to take a wild guess on their Iranian heritage, it would likely be somewhere around 10% give or take.

No, we are for 56.78935 % South American. You’re a comedian.

 
You are here not to clarify things, but you’re here for the confusion.
 
DNA results do not mean anything and prove nothing, especially when we’re talking about incorrect, manipulated and fake results done by Turks, Armenians (our historical and eternal enemies). These studies are nothing but full of full of a paradoxes. Stick these result in your ... .

 
Believe in whatever you want, but do not come with such stupid and wild claims. Kurds do not believe in these fairytales and not all Kurds are that naïve to get tricked. And you’re just making one big mistake. You don’t even know who Kurds are. Kurds will never get demoralized and will never give up. Whe don't even know what these words mean.

 
And special for you the Kurdish national anthem:
 

 
Our history is one filled with blood
Let no one say the Kurds are dead, the Kurds are alive
The Kurds are alive and our flag will never fall
We are the sons of the Medes and Keykhosrow
Our homeland is our faith and religion


Edited by MediaWarLord - 14-Jan-2011 at 21:01
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  Quote Ince Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Jan-2011 at 20:51
Who are the Keykhosrow? never heard of them. 
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  Quote MediaWarLord Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Jan-2011 at 20:59
Originally posted by Ince

Who are the Keykhosrow? never heard of them. 
Cyaxares or Hvakhshathra (Old Persian: Uvaxštra[2], Greek Κυαξάρης; r. 625 - 585 BC), the son of King Phraortes, was the first king of Media.
 
 


Edited by MediaWarLord - 14-Jan-2011 at 21:01
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  Quote MediaWarLord Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Jan-2011 at 21:03

The article about a legendary king of the Kayanian dynasty, Kai Khosrow.

 
"The name Kai Khosrow derives from Avestan Kavi Husravah, meaning "famous"."

 


Edited by MediaWarLord - 14-Jan-2011 at 21:16
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  Quote MediaWarLord Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Jan-2011 at 21:14

"In Yasht 5, 9.25, 17.45-46, Haosravah, a Kayanian king later known as Kay Khosrow, together with Zoroaster and Jamasp (a premier of Zoroaster's patron Vishtaspa, another Kayanian king) are seen to worship in Airyanem Vaejah. King Haosravah is described to have united the various Aryan tribes as one nation (Yasht 5.49, 9.21, 15.32, 17.41)."

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  Quote Ince Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Jan-2011 at 21:59

Eastern Anatolia: Heir to an Ancient Irano-Greek Legacy

CulturePosted by Prof. Farrokh, PhD Tue, November 24, 2009 10:53:53

A number of monhts ago, an article was posted regaridng the history of the Lion and the Sun motifs on Iranian flags. The image below was originally identified as an Achaemenid seal of King Artaxerxes II (at left) facing the godess Anahita who sits atop a lion. The seal however was not produced in the Achaemenid era, but after the fall of the Achaaemedis and is traceable to the post-Achaemenid dynasties of Anatolia known as Commagene, Cappadocia and the Pontus.

http://mulimagehost.com/image-47C5_4D310F63.jpg

The seal was discovered along the northeastern shore of the Black Sea (Consult Collon, 1987, no. 432) in the region of the ancient Pontus. The seal is in the British museum and not the Hermitage Museum of St. Petersburg as is often assumed.

Before we discuss (or revisit) the themes imprinted upon the plaque, we need to first provide a sketch of the successor states 0f Anatolia following the fall of the Achaemenids in 333-323 BC.

The Greco-Persian Legacy of Anatolia: An Overview

As Parthia gained prominence on the Iranian plateau and Mesopotamia, Persian culture had (once again) risen in prominence in Anatolia as it had during the Achaemenid era. Despite the fall of the Achamenid Empire a few hundred years before, the legacy of Iranic culture had never departed from eastern and central Anatolia. The Hellenic conquests had certinaly resulted in political divisions with different regional monarchies, however the:Iranic Culture of Pontus-Cappadocia endured.

http://mulimagehost.com/image-C7A1_4D310F63.jpg

The Kingdoms of Anatolia, Pontus, Commagene and Cappadocia bore a very strong Iranian cultural, artistic and mythological tradtion which was combined with that of ancient Greece. The kingdoms were later absorbed by the Roman Empire. Eastern Anatolia to this day endures with a distinct Iranic tradition with its Kurdish population speaking a west Iranian language akin to Persian.

The most famous Pontic leader was Mithradates (Mehrdad ) VI Eupator who was raised in the Greek language but also learned Persian (Bickerman, 1985, p.103; Raditsa, 1985, p.110). Plutarch notes that Mehrdad Eupator appeared in “Persian Dress“.

http://mulimagehost.com/image-6754_4D310F63.jpg
Mithradates (Mehrdad ) VI Eupator (134-63 BC). Mithradates spoke both Persian and Greek and sought to combine the traditions of both Greece and Persia. According to Plutarch, he appeared in “Persian Dress”.

Some Iranian influence even extended to Ionian coast along Aegean. Plutarch had noted that the cultural exchanges taking place in Ephesos (near modern Izmir in western Turkey), were leading to latter’s “barbarization” (Plutarch, Lys. 3). In Lycia, Iranic names become widespread among the nobility (Dandamaev & Lukonin, 1989, p.300). It was this Greco-Iranian legacy that was to inspire Mithradates of Eupador.

However, to characterize those regions as exclusively Iranian is simplistic: Eastern Anatolia bears a powerful Hellenic and subsequent Armenian imprint as well. During the Achaemenid era Greek cities began to be founded along the Black Sea coast Just as the Iranian Magi, nobility & settlers were arriving into the region. A similar process of Irano-Greek fusion had been taking place in the ancient Ukraine since at least Median times.

Just twenty years after the passing of the Hellenic conquerer Alexander in 333 BC, two independent Irano-Anatolian monarchies gained power in Anatolia by 305 BC: the Kingdoms of Pontus and Cappadocia. What is especially of interest is that their subjects claimed descent from the Achaemenids of the First Persian Empire (Raditsa, 1985, p.106). Note the contrast to those Iranians west of the Halys River in western Anatolia:who had become Hellenecized after the conquests of Alexander.

The Iranians of Cappadocia: fought against Alexander at Gaugamela in 331 BC and continued to resist the Greeks, even after the fall of the Achaemenids Empire (Raditsa, 1985, p.106). Hellenization took longer to find its roots in Cappadocia and began a century after Alexander’s conquests. The Iranian character of Cappadocia recognized as late as the time of Roman Emperor Augustus by the ancient historian Strabo who considered Cappadocia as: “a living part of Persia” (Strabo XV, 3.15).

Cappadocia bore a strong Zoroastrian legacy. Despite Alexander’s conquests of Asia Mino, Cappadocia still had many Iranian temples and Zoroastrian magi by the advent of Parthian rule in Persia (Strabo, XI, 14.16, XV, 733). Remarkable is the term of Grand Magus as being second after the king (Strabo, XII, 2.3). This term is found in Achaemenid, Parthian and Sassanian Persia.

The Mithraic-Zoroastrian temples of Cappadocia also served as centers of worship for the populations of: Armenia and Pontus (Raditsa, 1985, p.107) just as the temples of Media Atropatene did for Medes, Persians, Hyrcanians and other Iranic peoples of the Parthian realm.

By the 1st century BC Antiochus I of Commagne spoke of combining the mythology and cultures of Greece and Persia. His geneology claimed Iranian descent from the Achaemenids and Greek descent from Alexander.
http://mulimagehost.com/image-27A9_4D310F63.jpg

Statue at Nimrud-Dagh (ancient Commagene). Note the combination of tall conical Persian hat (still used by mystic cults and Dervishes) with Greek style of anthropomorphic depiction. Antiochus I (86-38 BC) spoke Greek but dressed in Iranian style and demanded that the local Magi dress like the Persians. The surviving statues and architecture of Nimrud-Dagh shows a clear synthesis of Greek and Persian arts and architecture (Ghirschman, 1962).

The regions of Cappadocia and Pontus failed to attract the same level of Hellenic immigration as those further east and south into Iran and Mesopotamia. As noted by Raditsa,

“…Hellenization in lands like Pontus and Cappadocia meant that the natives Hellenized themselves” (1985, p.112)

Assyriology notes on the Plaque: Heir to a Mesopotamian Tradition

But what of the plaque discussed in the introduction of the article?

http://mulimagehost.com/image-0862_4D310F63.jpg

It is interesting that the seal shows the sun emanating 21 rays, the same symbol which is used by varous ancient Iranic cults among the Kurds of Iran, Iraq and Turkey. The 21 rays may be related to the festival date of Mehregan (Festival of the Sun-god Mithra) which takes place from the 16th to the 21st of Mehr of the Iranian calendar.

That too is in the post-Achaemenid tradition of arts and its style bears a stronger resemblance to the Achaemenid rather than the Hellenic arts. This was (as noted earlier) found in the site of the ancient Pontus where the imprint of Zoroastrianism was strong.

The plaque represents Anahita superimposed on a solar deity - perhaps the ancient Iranic god Mithras. But is the theme specifically Iranic and/or Zoroastrian? The discipline of Assyriology provides an interesting explanation as to an ancient Mesopotamian tradition that has exerted its own influence upon the Iranian-type seal.

Professor Simo Parpola accounts of the the seal are as follows:

"The Achaemenid seal discovered on the northeast coast of the Black Sea and represents the goddess Anahita, mounted on a lion and surrounded by the divine radiance, appearing to a Persian king. The details of the king’s and the goddess’s dress and crown are Persian, but in all other respects the seal is a faithful reproduction of centuries older Assyrian seals depicting appearances of the goddess Ishtar to members of the imperial ruling class. It thus illustrates not only the adoption of the Mesopotamian concept of “divine radiance” by the Persians"

http://mulimagehost.com/image-D863_4D310F63.jpg

A Neo-Assyrian seal (circa 750-650 BC) of Ishtar (at left) standing with her bow on her mythical lion. She is faced by a worshipper. British Museum. The Assyrian and Mesopotamian tradition in general certainly left a robust legacy on the Achaemenid Persians who succeeded them. Indeed the Aramaic language was the Lingua Franca of the Achaemenid Empire.

Therefore while the Achaemenid (or post-Achaemenid) seal has Iranian mythological themes, its artistic motifs have certainly drawn from an ancient Mesopotamian tradition.

References

Collon, D. (1987). First Impressions: Cylinder Seals in the Ancient Near East. London: British Museum Publications.

Dandamaev, M., & Lukonin, V.G. (1989). The Culture and Social Institutions of Ancient Iran. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Ghirshman, R. (1962). Iran: Parthians and Sassanians. London: Thames & Hudson.

Nissinen, M. (Editor) (2000). Prophecy in Its Ancient Near Eastern Context: Mesopotamian, Biblical, and Arabian. Atlanta, GA: Society of Biblical Literature.

Parpolo, S. (1997). Assyrian Prophecies. Helsinki, Finland:Helsinki University.

Edited by Ince - 14-Jan-2011 at 22:09
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  Quote Putty19 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15-Jan-2011 at 08:37
Originally posted by Ince

Regradless of how much of genetic impact the Iranic tribes had, the Iranic heritage of the Kurds also includes culture and language.  Persians,Lors,Gilaks,Talysh,Ossetians are all in the same boat and they are not less iranic then east iranians, because they have more mixed genetic ancestory.  

Most of the important historical points of Iranian history happend in West Iran and by west iranians, and their descendants live in West Iranians.  Before Fars, Persians were around lake urmia and they would of also had incroperated some of the local population before even moving to Fars.   The Medes, Achaemenids, Parthians, even the Sassanids were all mostly mixed and they identified themselves as Aryans and even the Sassanids were the first to name Iran(Eran) meaning the "Land of Aryans".

Anyway I still don't think that testing 87 Kurds out of 20+ Million Anatolian Kurds is a good indication it would be the same on a larger tests.  For all we know the people they had tested all came from the same region.

No nation is geneticaly pure or carry 100% linage of the people that established the identiy and language,  Look at Northern Europeans they are mainly all R1b and I and yet Eastern Indo-Europeans do not carry that linage.  Humans have  tendancy to mix and incroperate other people.  


Yes, all Iranian speakers in the Middle East are actually on the same boat as the Kurds (In terms of mixing), I was just stating facts, and yes, no one is 100% pure, but these are the facts that we have in front of us, there's no need to make assumptions when there's no evidence on those assumptions, from all DNA studies done on the Kurds it points them to the Middle East (Around Eastern Anatolia and the Zagros) as their homeland, until further evidence show up, I'm going to believe that the Kurds are Middle Eastern natives for most part with some minor Iranic background.
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  Quote Ince Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15-Jan-2011 at 09:09
Then your assuming that genetics is the whole basis of ethnicity,  Minor Iranic background? maybe on the genetic imprint, what about historical background, Cultural background,language? take all this into account as that is what shapes a nation.   Kurds have a mixed background from various groups, many believe term Kurt comes from the Guti and they were not even natives and arrived late compared to others that were present.  Because most of the Haplogroups groups Kurds carry are found around the sourounding people in does not mean that Kurds are pure natives of the land.   Even on MTDNA Kurds show closer ties to Europe then to Caucasians. 

Edited by Ince - 15-Jan-2011 at 09:11
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  Quote Putty19 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15-Jan-2011 at 17:16
Originally posted by Ince

Then your assuming that genetics is the whole basis of ethnicity,  Minor Iranic background? maybe on the genetic imprint, what about historical background, Cultural background,language? take all this into account as that is what shapes a nation.   Kurds have a mixed background from various groups, many believe term Kurt comes from the Guti and they were not even natives and arrived late compared to others that were present.  Because most of the Haplogroups groups Kurds carry are found around the sourounding people in does not mean that Kurds are pure natives of the land.   Even on MTDNA Kurds show closer ties to Europe then to Caucasians. 


Yes, I'm basing this on genetic grounds, I mean afterall, we're talking about ancestors here, language and culture can be adopted which happens all the time.

Anyways, I'm gonna stop arguing here, this whole thing looks like a turning circle and I think I'm done proving my point.
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  Quote Ince Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15-Jan-2011 at 19:08
Originally posted by Putty19

Originally posted by Ince

Then your assuming that genetics is the whole basis of ethnicity,  Minor Iranic background? maybe on the genetic imprint, what about historical background, Cultural background,language? take all this into account as that is what shapes a nation.   Kurds have a mixed background from various groups, many believe term Kurt comes from the Guti and they were not even natives and arrived late compared to others that were present.  Because most of the Haplogroups groups Kurds carry are found around the sourounding people in does not mean that Kurds are pure natives of the land.   Even on MTDNA Kurds show closer ties to Europe then to Caucasians. 


Yes, I'm basing this on genetic grounds, I mean afterall, we're talking about ancestors here, language and culture can be adopted which happens all the time.

Anyways, I'm gonna stop arguing here, this whole thing looks like a turning circle and I think I'm done proving my point.


Heres the thing, Kurds only claim they are the descendeds of the Medo-Scythians that were in Kurdistan, which they are.  I do not think genetic is the basis of ethnicity, take away language and culture and the even Kurdish religion of Ezidi and all you are left with is a empty shell, then you are no longer a Kurd.   Same with Persians,Lors,Gilaks,Talysh,Ossetiens,Mazandaranis they all carry the legacy of the their ancestors and no matter how much of small genetic imprint they have they are still Iranic.   


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  Quote MediaWarLord Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-Jan-2011 at 15:02
Originally posted by Ince

Minor Iranic background? maybe on the genetic imprint, what about historical background, Cultural background,language?
Once again, maybe or maybe not. How do you know which genetics the Medes had? Maybe they had the same genetics as the modern Kurds.
 
Maybe the Medes had Hg 'F', Hg 'K', Hg 'I' and Hg 'J2' ( Hg IJK -> HgIJ ) and Hg 'R' in them. And Kurds are not pure Medes, they're partly Hurrian. Maybe the Hurrians also belonged to the Hg 'F', Hg 'I', 'J2', 'K', 'G', 'R' etc. But nobody knows which Hg is Median and which Hg is Hurrian. It's impossible, because haplogroups are much older than the Medes, Hurrians and other ancient people.
Like modern people, ancient people also belonged to more haplogroups. And not just 1 haplogroup. Haplogroups doesn't mean anything. There're no races! There is just 1 race, the human race.
 
And the fact is that we are mostly connected with the Medes than to other people.


Edited by MediaWarLord - 16-Jan-2011 at 15:14
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  Quote Ince Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-Jan-2011 at 22:01
Early Medes were likely a mix of Natives and iranian tribes and eventually the Iranian part became more dominant. 


Edited by Ince - 16-Jan-2011 at 22:04
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  Quote Ince Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Jan-2011 at 10:46
Originally posted by MediaWarLord

Originally posted by Ince

Minor Iranic background? maybe on the genetic imprint, what about historical background, Cultural background,language?
Once again, maybe or maybe not. How do you know which genetics the Medes had? Maybe they had the same genetics as the modern Kurds.
 
Maybe the Medes had Hg 'F', Hg 'K', Hg 'I' and Hg 'J2' ( Hg IJK -> HgIJ ) and Hg 'R' in them. And Kurds are not pure Medes, they're partly Hurrian. Maybe the Hurrians also belonged to the Hg 'F', Hg 'I', 'J2', 'K', 'G', 'R' etc. But nobody knows which Hg is Median and which Hg is Hurrian. It's impossible, because haplogroups are much older than the Medes, Hurrians and other ancient people.
Like modern people, ancient people also belonged to more haplogroups. And not just 1 haplogroup. Haplogroups doesn't mean anything. There're no races! There is just 1 race, the human race.
 
And the fact is that we are mostly connected with the Medes than to other people.


We do know that Persians and Medes were both located around North Iran in the early days and likely, like I mentioned before,  the unions were likely made up of natives and the Iranic tribes and eventually the Iranic identiy became more dominant.  Iranic tribes of Medes and Persians likely came threw the Caucasus region rather then the east. and maybe they might of incroperated some people even before arriving to Iran.   Kurds of Iran are very close to Persians and Lors in mtDNA and close to North Iran and Caucasians.   Kurds of Iran, are genetically closer to Iranians of Iran then to Kurds of Anatolia, because of the vast distance and lack of gene flow and also the political states and dynasty that have ruled each region.  Regradless they are still Kurds. 

http://oi51.tinypic.com/2nw1wxy.jpg
http://oi52.tinypic.com/2s7z48g.jpg


Edited by Ince - 17-Jan-2011 at 10:48
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  Quote Ince Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Jan-2011 at 12:50
Kurdish tribes

Their is  large Laki tribe South Western Kurdistan in Anatolia, did not know that. 

http://oi54.tinypic.com/1zq5ukh.jpg


Edited by Ince - 17-Jan-2011 at 12:54
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  Quote Ramyar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18-Jan-2011 at 15:50
Well , after reading most of this topic I conclude the fallowing :
This topic is something I call a blind Patriot vs the facts .

Remember : in History only facts and neutral Psychology counts , nothing else !
and since this rule is not being followed here , I bet that this topic is going to reach even further then 30 pages without even coming to a proper conclusion .






Edited by Ramyar - 18-Jan-2011 at 15:51
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  Quote Ince Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18-Jan-2011 at 16:18
Originally posted by Ramyar

Well , after reading most of this topic I conclude the fallowing :
This topic is something I call a blind Patriot vs the facts .

Remember : in History only facts and neutral Psychology counts , nothing else !
and since this rule is not being followed here , I bet that this topic is going to reach even further then 30 pages without even coming to a proper conclusion .






Could you please give more details on your thoughts?
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  Quote Ince Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Jan-2011 at 20:03
Pictures of Kurdish Kids Smile


http://i1.trekearth.com/photos/3173/img_4778.jpghttp://www.pukmedia.com/english/images/stories/hogr4/kurdishchildren.jpghttp://www.international.ucla.edu/media/images/turtlescanfly.jpg
http://img505.imageshack.us/img505/9695/lfc11go5.jpg
http://www.haberpanorama.com/images/news/9278.jpg




http://www.analizmerkezi.com/image/haber/Resim_1285851770.jpg
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2581/3775942783_7409f8f532.jpg
http://galeri.uludagsozluk.com/10/k%C3%BCrt-%C3%A7ocuklar%C4%B1_68184.jpg

kürt çocukları

http://www.guzelvebakimli.com/wp-content/uploads/kurtkizi.jpg
http://www.turkiyehaberajansi.com/userfiles//mrd-2.jpg
http://hunney.files.wordpress.com/2008/07/diyarbakir-by-petra-nuzdorfer-67.jpg
http://galeri.uludagsozluk.com/60/k%C3%BCrt-%C3%A7ocu%C4%9Fu_75590.jpg
http://img2.blogcu.com/images/s/i/z/sizofrenaksamlar/487829bebb3ff5abba08caeuq1.jpg
http://www.travel-images.com/pht/iran433.jpg
http://centralasia.imb.org/pwalk/images/KPwalkKids.jpg
http://www.examiner.com/images/blog/EXID25600/images/resized_4087291740_2c93ff9327.jpg

http://www.taipeitimes.com/images/2003/03/24/20030323144133.jpeg
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2523/3865589274_98a0b2ca87.jpg
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2519/3864804407_355d16e2f8.jpg
http://www.damascusbureau.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/12.jpg
http://www.michaelyon-online.com/images/stories/products/sfi/kurdishchildren-01.jpg
http://www.michaelyon-online.com/images/stories/products/sfi/kurdishgirl-01.jpg

http://i1.treklens.com/photos/15497/67_bb-l2b.jpg
http://www.michaelyon-online.com/images/stories/products/sfi/prettykursihgirl-01.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3324/3452289254_f4091b1da7.jpg
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/86/Children_puppy_sulaimania.jpg


Edited by Ince - 19-Jan-2011 at 20:03
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  Quote Ince Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Jan-2011 at 20:10
One of the best Kurdish songs released recently.



Song is in Turkish, its one of fav songs and the Singer is Kurdish and was born in my city.


Gorani Kurds, love this song!!



Edited by Ince - 19-Jan-2011 at 20:41
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