Notice: This is the official website of the All Empires History Community (Reg. 10 Feb 2002)

  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Register Register  Login Login

Spread of Christainity

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
John the Kern View Drop Down
Samurai
Samurai
Avatar

Joined: 08-Mar-2005
Location: United Kingdom
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 137
  Quote John the Kern Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Spread of Christainity
    Posted: 14-Apr-2007 at 15:35
How fast did the native tribes get converted?
How/Did they bedn Christianity to fit their culture?
 
My peoples tale is written in blood
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest
Guest
  Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Apr-2007 at 19:33

Very fast.

But it depended on the case if the tribes were conquered or not. For instance, Spaniards conquered about half the territories of today's Hispanic America, and natives lefts of theirs area of influence were not converted to christianity, obviously. In Brazil, almost half the territory was not conquered by the Portugueses, either. Those natives that were not conquered usually preserve theirs believe up to this day.
 
Now, Natives that got conquered usually passed by a process of religious syncretism. The Catholic priests, that were quite smart in preaching theirs religion, usually got Natives into the Church by addopting local religious ideas to Christianity.
 
For example, it is quite obvious that Mayans and Aztecs, that practised human sacrifices regularly, got fascinated with the shocking images of a bleeding Jesus in the cross, despicted with luxury of details. In certain sense, from their point of view, Catholic Christianism was just a variation of theirs own believes, and it is amazing the coincidences in both religious forms. The Virgin of Guadaloupe, for instance, seem to be for ancient Indias a syncretic form of adoration to an ancient local godness, transformed into the Catholic cannon. The same is appreciated quite clearly with other religious figures in  most Latin America, where ancient gods more than replaced mutated to new ones. Quetzalcoatl got converted in Jesus, sort of speak.
 
Even today, the cult of the Saint Death, in Mexico, seem quite out of place with Catholicism, and I believe is rooted in an ancient mentality that has never dissapeared.
 
Ancient Amerindian traditions never died. Of course, human sacrifices were forbidden, but still today you can see Quechuas performing the sacrifice of the llama, in honour to the Pachamama.
 
In any case, Natives and today Latinos are sincere in theirs Catholic believes, and they know more about that religion that more Europeans.
 
In certain way, many Latinos consider that religion was one of the possitive things brough by Europeans to the Americas, and everyone knows that priest have usually being at the side of the Indian and the poors rather than supporting the injustices.
 
In any case, the changes were fast. In a century all the Natives and mixed people in the Spanish Empire of the Americas were Catholics. Under Spain rule there was not choice but being Catholic because that was the official religion of that state.
 
Pinguin
 
 
Back to Top
Cryptic View Drop Down
Arch Duke
Arch Duke

Retired AE Moderator

Joined: 05-Jul-2006
Location: United States
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 1962
  Quote Cryptic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Apr-2007 at 23:28
Originally posted by John the Kern

How fast did the native tribes get converted?
 
An excellent question.  As far as North America goes....
 
Does anybody know if the Five civilized tribes were mostly Christians at the time of their forced relocation to Oklahoma in 1838?  I know in General terms that the Aleuts in Alaska were converted to Russian Orthodox Christianity by the late 17th Century. 
 
By the time of the  Wounded Knee massacare in 1890, Christianity had begun making inroads amongst the Cheyenne and the Sioux.   One of the influences in the death of Sitting Bull (who openly rejected Christianity) was an internal conflict between Lakota adherents of the traditional religion and those Lakota  that were receptive to Christianity.  
Originally posted by pinguin

For example, it is quite obvious that Mayans and Aztecs, that practised human sacrifices regularly, got fascinated with the shocking images of a bleeding Jesus in the cross, despicted with luxury of details.  
 
Spanish Catholicsm has always emphasized the suffering nature of Christ to a far greater degree than other Catholic nations.  It is an interesting historical coincidence that it was the Spanish who brought Catholic Christian theology and graphic artwork of the crucifiction to the Meso Americans rather than the more subdued French. 
 
Another interesting coincidence is the Spanish cultural traditons of "Bull Fights" or more poperly Corridas de los Toros.   These Corridas are traditionaly presented as a ritualized dance (easily seen by Meso Americans as an animal sacrifice).  No doubt this cultural practice helped to bridge the gap between the Meso Americans and the Spanish.  Corridas performed during La Semana Santa before Easter probably had a religous impact on the Meso Americans as well.  


Edited by Cryptic - 17-Apr-2007 at 23:47
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest
Guest
  Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18-Apr-2007 at 22:12
Originally posted by Cryptic

..Spanish Catholicsm has always emphasized the suffering nature of Christ to a far greater degree than other Catholic nations.  It is an interesting historical coincidence that it was the Spanish who brought Catholic Christian theology and graphic artwork of the crucifiction to the Meso Americans rather than the more subdued French. 
 
Another interesting coincidence is the Spanish cultural traditons of "Bull Fights" or more poperly Corridas de los Toros.   These Corridas are traditionaly presented as a ritualized dance (easily seen by Meso Americans as an animal sacrifice).  No doubt this cultural practice helped to bridge the gap between the Meso Americans and the Spanish.  Corridas performed during La Semana Santa before Easter probably had a religous impact on the Meso Americans as well.  
 
Yes, Indeed. I believe there was a syncronicity in there.
 
Even more curious is that Mexico is one of the few countries in Latin America were bullfighting is not forbidden. I definitively see  a connection in there.
 
Pinguin
 
 
 
 
Back to Top
LeopoldPhilippe View Drop Down
Baron
Baron


Joined: 05-May-2015
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 405
  Quote LeopoldPhilippe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05-Jul-2015 at 20:36
The first French missionaries in North America arrived in 1625.     
Known to native peoples as the Black Robes, the Jesuits concentrated their efforts on the Huron. The Jesuits lived with the tribes in their villages.
Back to Top
Windemere View Drop Down
Samurai
Samurai
Avatar

Joined: 09-Oct-2007
Location: United States
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 105
  Quote Windemere Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06-Jul-2015 at 13:19
The English Puritans of Massachusetts Bay were extremely suspicious and resentful of the French Jesuits living to the north, in New France, who were establishing missions among the Indians. The Jesuits were working not only with the Hurons, but also with several other tribes, including the Algonquins, Montagnais, and Abenakis. The Abenakis lived in northern new England, in what later became Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. Maine at this time was claimed by both New France and New England, and the Puritans resented the Jesuit Indian mission there.
Windemere
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Bulletin Board Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 9.56a [Free Express Edition]
Copyright ©2001-2009 Web Wiz

This page was generated in 0.109 seconds.