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Literature and Revolution in the 19th cen

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Justinian View Drop Down
Chieftain
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  Quote Justinian Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Literature and Revolution in the 19th cen
    Posted: 11-Sep-2006 at 20:21
I have been reading Alexandre Dumas and Fyodor Dostoevsky lately, both authors from the 19th century.  I was just thinking about the incredible literary works created during the 19th century throughout Europe and was wondering if anyone thought there was a direct connection between the revolutions (1848 etc.) in the middle of the century and the explosion of literature?  Is it perhaps the liberal thinking popular during this century that sparked the intellectual prowess?  Most of these authors were from the middle classes, perhaps it started with the enlightenment and french revolution and really achieved fruition when the rest of Europe opened up their countries like never before to the lower classes after the 19th century revolutions.  Any thoughts?
"War is a cowardly escape from the problems of peace."--Thomas Mann

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Justinian View Drop Down
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  Quote Justinian Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Sep-2006 at 23:55
After further thought perhaps there is a connection between the literary explosion and the "relative" peace of europe during the 19th century.  No opinions?
"War is a cowardly escape from the problems of peace."--Thomas Mann

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giani_82 View Drop Down
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  Quote giani_82 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Oct-2006 at 07:12
Try Leo Tolstoy, Ivan Turgenev for the russian way of nihilist preconception. And u known the authors of Victorian Age Britain that gave us an unbearable social critiscizm. After all social critiscizm is probably one of the finest way to help out the progress of Industrial revolution.
"Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising everytime we fall."
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  Quote Aelfgifu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Oct-2006 at 08:30
There are some pretty interesting theories on what factors there have to be to cause a revolution, and the reasons why revolutions broke out in France and Russia but not in England for instance. 
 
Of course, having a large poor proletarian class is a necessety, but they in themselves do not revolt easily, (as in England, where there certainly was a large labout class but no revolution). This class is the explosive but it needs a fuse.
 
This fuse is exactly what you described: an educated middle class or bourgeoisie with enlightend ideals. In Russia it was Tolstoi and Dostoyevski, in France it was Voltaire and many others of course.
 
So, Yes, I do think there is a very strong connection between literature and revolution. Big smile

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  Quote giani_82 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Oct-2006 at 13:30

Yeah, but we still have to consider trade roots and industry - England and Spain for instance were sophisticated in building oversea empires, growing in industrial and farming capacity which was a prerequisite for the raising of such a class. These far travells assisted in anticipating another type of cultural diversity that opened these otherwise utherly conservative European communities. The spiritual freedom that the Protestanism caused also assisted into building values such as freedom of speech and believes - teaching was no longer a priority for the aristocrats, but also for the growing generations of new merchants and explorers.

France at that time was a crack at building an oversea empire and had to convulse into it's own impulses of absolutism, where the mind went far ahead the political reforms.
"Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising everytime we fall."
Confucius
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