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Finest Army of the 20th Century

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Poll Question: Japanese Army 1905
Poll Choice Votes Poll Statistics
5 [1.89%]
15 [5.66%]
78 [29.43%]
61 [23.02%]
82 [30.94%]
21 [7.92%]
3 [1.13%]
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  Quote Mosquito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Finest Army of the 20th Century
    Posted: 14-May-2010 at 04:08
WOW Maximus Germanicus, thats a real storm i gathered over my poor head. First I must admitt that Im not a native english speaker so Im gratefull for correcting my mistakes in writing english. I do not consider myself as anti - american and my errors in writing have nothing to do with my attitude towards USA. As for Patton I got his book myself and have read it years ago. To say truth its not quite his book or it is hard to say to which extent he has written it (co authors are his wife and adiutant).
As for the numbers in Japanesse -Soviet border wars I remember to read Russian article about it which was giving different numbers (isint it possible that only part of Soviet forces was engaged into battles?). Also so far I know leand lease help for USSR wasnt going trough Pacific ports of Russia but by Atalntic so the argument about importance of Japan blockade seems to be failed.
 
When I was writing about american shorthsighted and ingorant viev I meant your mention about Poles fighting with lances against the German tanks. If you take for example the battle of Mokra where brigade of Polish cavalry stopped German 4th Panzer division and destroyed 150 tanks and armoured vehicles it is clear that it wasnt made with lances. The main antitank weapon of Polish cavalry was Bofors anti-tank gun. Also the reason of the defeat of Polish army wasnt that it was so ill equipped but that Poland was attacked from North (east Prussia), west (Germany) and sought (Czechoslovakia) on the extremly long front, being outnumbered 2 to 1 only in manpower, not to count other numbers.
"I am a pure-blooded Polish nobleman, without a single drop of bad blood, certainly not German blood" - Friedrich Nietzsche
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  Quote Mosquito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-May-2010 at 04:14
Please Maximus try to read this old topic from this forum:
 
 
 
 
 
 
"I am a pure-blooded Polish nobleman, without a single drop of bad blood, certainly not German blood" - Friedrich Nietzsche
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  Quote Maximus Germanicus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-May-2010 at 05:12
It is a fact that the Poles used lancers to fight the Germans--To me that speaks of thier bravery not an insult.
 
Didn't you read my whole post:
 
I will give the Poles credit they had some brass ones. They went right after the invaders even with outdated equipment sometimes mounted on horseback. The also did a heck of a lot of damage to the Germans, had the Russians not attacked them from Behind the Poles could have resisited a lot longer.
 
Germany sustained relatively heavy losses, especially in vehicles and planes: Poland cost the Germans approximately the equipment of an entire armored division and 25% of its air strength.[83] As for duration, the September Campaign lasted only about one week less than the Battle of France in 1940, even though the Anglo-French forces were much closer to parity with the Germans in numerical strength and equipment.[Note 8] Furthermore, the Polish Army was preparing the Romanian Bridgehead, which would have prolonged Polish defence, but this plan was cancelled due to the Soviet invasion of Poland on 17 September 1939.[84] Poland also never officially surrendered to the Germans. Under German occupation, the Polish army continued to fight underground, as Armia Krajowa and forest partisans – Leśni. The Polish resistance movement in World War II in German-occupied Poland was the largest resistance movement in all of occupied Europe.[85]

As you see, I respect what the Poles did. So don't read to much into it. The Poles fought valiantly I have tremendous respect for them. Bottom line Russia invading them is what hastnened thier defeat. I happen to like the Poles a lot I have worked with them in both the BAlkans and Afghanistan. They are great soldiers. The only think they need is a modernazation of thier Army. Of all the nations I have worked with the Poles, Norwegians and Brits ones I would want to go to war with.

It is a historical fact the Poles used lancers, they also used tanks and the Bofors, they also had a good airforce. They were a huge disadvantage to the Germans in tech and man power but they out up good resistance. It is accurate the used the horses as hopilites or dragoons but the did use the cavalry charge, It have a book somewhere with a picture of it. That being said the Bulgarains, and other Axis countries used Horses also.
 
In the book the forgotten soldier Sayer comments and how much the Polish partisians disrupted the Germans supply lines.
 
By the way land lease flowed across the Pacific to Russia also. From both the US and Canada. If you read the US Army Logistics operations in WW2 the big green book it details this.
 
The Russians greatly exagerated the numbers of not just the Russo Japenese war but all conflicts it is part of thier propaganda machine.


Edited by Maximus Germanicus - 14-May-2010 at 05:20
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  Quote Maximus Germanicus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-May-2010 at 05:23
Originally posted by Mosquito

Please Maximus try to read this old topic from this forum:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thats good stuff, I have no problem with the Poles they did a better job than the French against the Germans.
 
Had Russia not invaded they could have held out a lot longer against Germany.  I really think thats why the allies delayed the invasion for so long to punish Russia. Russia helped start the War. Who knowes if Poland held out longer maybe the War would have ended quicker. Blame Uncle Joe for that.
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  Quote kalhur Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-May-2010 at 06:29
USA all the wayBig smile 
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  Quote Mosquito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-May-2010 at 07:31
Originally posted by Maximus Germanicus

It is a fact that the Poles used lancers to fight the Germans--To me that speaks of thier bravery not an insult.
 
 
To me it sounds like a stupidity, when one uses lances against the tanks. And so far i know Polish cavalry didnt use lances in combat but only on parades (but sabers were used on German necks, thats fact).
 
As for the German losses in Polish campaign they are not sure. It was proven that due to propaganda reasons Germans were giving lowered numbers of their casualties. Especially in some battles they completelly hidden their casualties because they were compromittating for Wermaht. The most famous examples are battle of Westerplatte and battle of Wizna (where Germans outnumbered Polish forces 40 to 1 and battle took 3 days). Heinz Guderian who was personally commanding German forces in this battle threatened the Polish commander captain Raginis that he will give order of executing PoWs if Poles wont surrender. 
 
"I am a pure-blooded Polish nobleman, without a single drop of bad blood, certainly not German blood" - Friedrich Nietzsche
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  Quote Cryptic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15-May-2010 at 05:32
Originally posted by opuslola

The USA, and its allies in the West,made a very good decision, they decided that it was better that the Germans and the Soviets, destroy one another, than risk more of British, American or French, etc., lives! 
I agree, but FDR was at least somewhat open to an earlier invasion of France (1943).  At FDR's request, the  U.S. General Staff even did a strategic study and concluded that an allied invasion in 1943 invasion would be successful, though perhaps not strongly advocated.
 
The British, however, refused to even consider it. The British empire lost 970,000 men in WWI and they were determined to avoid anything remotely resembling attrition style campaigns unless they were absolutely necessarry. They insisted on the "Soft under belly" (Italy) in 1943.  Even after Italy, the British proposed Yugoslavia and then Norway as alternatives to France.   
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  Quote Domen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Jun-2010 at 16:11
I voted for the German army.
 
On Germand and Allied combat effectiveness:
 
 
Something on American infantry in WW2 - opinion of US Army General Gavin (last months of 1944):

General Gavin: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_M._Gavin

If our infantry would fight, this war would be over by now. On our present front, there are two very weak German regiments holding the XVIII Corps of four divisions. We all know it and admit it, and yet nothing is done about it. American infantry just simply will not fight. No one wants to get killed... Our artillery is wonderful and our air corps not bad. But the regular infantry - terrible. Everybody wants to live to a ripe old age. The sight of a few Germans drives them to their holes. Instead of being imbued with an overwhelming desire to get close to the German and get him by the throat, they want to avoid him if the artillery has not already knocked him flat.

Source: "Armageddon. The battle for Germany 1944-45", Max Hastings, page 267
 
German and Allied performance comparison:
 
 
German vs. Allied war-making potential:
 

Casualties in the Normandy campaign:
 
 
 
They went right after the invaders even with outdated equipment sometimes mounted on horseback.
 
Among factors which determined the Polish defeat in 1939 were numerical and material superiority of the enemy, problems with communication and poor high level leadership:
 


Edited by Domen - 22-Jun-2010 at 16:25
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  Quote opuslola Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-Jun-2010 at 17:23
Perhaps American troops, whilst invading foreign nations, thought better about being "cannon fodder" than their grand-fathers? And, perhaps, when Aamerica held the air theatre as a spider holds its prey, they were well thought to stay within their own lairs,and wait untill overpowering air cover, could clear the way with little loss of life!

Smart, very smart!

Edited by opuslola - 22-Jun-2010 at 17:24
http://www.quotationspage.com/subjects/history/
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  Quote Cryptic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Jun-2010 at 09:42
Originally posted by opuslola

Perhaps American troops, whilst invading foreign nations, thought better about being "cannon fodder" than their grand-fathers? And, perhaps, when Aamerica held the air theatre as a spider holds its prey, they were well thought to stay within their own lairs,and wait untill overpowering air cover, could clear the way with little loss of life!

Smart, very smart!
 
I agree, the U.S. approach to World War II was to maximize fire power and minimize U.S. casualties.  This was very smart and worked well (over all).
 
At the same time, other Generals, including Eisehower (known for being very fair and non glory seeking) also voiced concerns about the performance of many U.S. "ordinary conscript" divisions in late 1944.  This led to a few elite U.S. divisions (101, 82, 4th, 1st, 9th etc) to do more than their fair share and also may have led to U.S. casualties as it gave the Germans time to recover and launch the Ardennes counter offensive.
 
 
 


Edited by Cryptic - 23-Jun-2010 at 19:13
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  Quote Domen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Jun-2010 at 11:59
Well, it's quite true that nothing was enough against American offensive firepower:
 
 
Napalm and other lethal inventions were already in use during WW2. Napalm was used for example on Okinawa.
 
But does it make US Army the "finest" army of late WW2 (1944 - 1945) or "just" the strongest?
 
Actually in areas where the US Army was not able to fully take advantage of their firepower (like for example initial phase of the Normandy campaign with it's bocage terrain, Hurtgen forest, Iwo-Jima, Westwall, some areas in Italy), they were performing rather poorly despite numerical superiority.
 
If it comes to Europe also German qualitative superiority (both in terms of equipment - e.g. tanks, small arms - and average training of their soldiers) largely, to a considerable extent, overcame the American numerical & firepower superiority in terms of casualty ratios of both sides at least.
 
Against unconventional warfare (Vietnam, Apghanistan) Americans also perform poorly because they are not able to just "roll" their enemies with simple firepower, communication and technological superiority (like in the Persian Gulf) because enemies are avoiding face-to-face combat. Yet the Japanese realized that their army was too poorly equipped compared to Americans to confront them in the open field as equals - and on Tarawa, Angaur, Peleliu and Iwo-Jima the new Japan tactics worked well and resulted in heavy American casualties (heavier than Japanese when counting KIA and WIA).


Edited by Domen - 24-Jun-2010 at 12:21
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  Quote Cryptic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Jun-2010 at 13:24

Originally posted by Domen

If it comes to Europe also German qualitative superiority (both in terms of equipment - e.g. tanks, small arms - and average training of their soldiers) largely, to a considerable extent, overcame the American numerical & firepower superiority in terms of casualty ratios of both sides at least.

Your analysis is not entirely correct.  U.S. small arms equal o or perhaps better than all but the most elite German units.  German tanks were superior, but that was not what made the Germans so lethal per se.  What really made the Germans lethal was highly skilled batallion, regimental and divisional commanders who could get the absolute most out of their units.  Being on the defensive did not hurt either.
 
Originally posted by Domen

Against unconventional warfare (Vietnam, Apghanistan) Americans also perform poorly because they are not able to just "roll" their enemies with simple firepower, communication and technological superiority (like in the Persian Gulf)
Really?  Counter Insurgency warfare is difficult for everyone.  Yugoslav partisans fought against the mighty Wermacht for years and were never beaten.  In fact, the U.S. has beaten the Iraqi insurgents.
 
 
Originally posted by Domen

Actually in areas where the US Army was not able to fully take advantage of their firepower (like for example initial phase of the Normandy campaign with it's bocage terrain, Hurtgen forest, Iwo-Jima, Westwall, some areas in Italy), they were performing rather poorly despite numerical superiority.
Iwo Jima is not a good example. U.S. marines killed 21, 000 Japanese defenders while suffering only 7,000 KIA.  The Mount Suriabachi was captured in days despite the Japanese having months to prepare. It took less than one month to secure the island in the face of very dedicated resistance by trained troops.  Defeating dedicated defenders in close terrain is difficult for everyone. The Wermacht found that out at Stalingrad.
 
 


Edited by Cryptic - 24-Jun-2010 at 13:52
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  Quote Domen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25-Jun-2010 at 04:42
It took less than one month to secure the island
 
Which is not impressive at all considering the size of the island and US forces involved in capturing it.
 
U.S. small arms equal o or perhaps better than all but the most elite German units.
 
Sorry but American machine guns could not compete with MG 42, which was the basic weapon of every German infantry team.
 
Being on the defensive did not hurt either.
 

Counterattacks are indispensible parts of every defense (and very costly for the defender) + position of an attacker is much more favourable than position of a defender in many aspects. Also enemy firepower (especially artillery and air attacks) hurts while being on the defensive.
 
Someone even wrote:
 
There are words which carry the presage of defeat. Defence is such a word. What is the result of an even victorious defence? The next attempt of imposing it to that weaker, the defender. The attacker, despite temporary setback, feels the master of situation.
 
Iwo Jima is not a good example. U.S. marines killed 21, 000 Japanese defenders while suffering only 7,000 KIA. 
 
 
Americans had got huge numerical, technological, material and firepower superiority on Iwo-Jima + they had got extremely powerful naval support and extremely powerful air support as well as some armoured vehicles. In spite of this fact losses of both sides were:
 
Japan - 4,845 dead, 13,000 missing (and never found), 216 PoW (most WIA) = 18,061
Americans
- 6,188 KIA and MIA (including few hundreds MIA), 18,059 WIA = 24,247
 
In other battles mentioned above casualty ratio was also favorable for the Japanese under the circumstances:
 
Tarawa:
 
Japan - 2,483 dead (I don't count unarmed Korean labourers), 17 PoW = 2,500 casualties
Americans - 1,115 KIA, 2,355 WIA = 3,470 casualties 
 
Angaur:
 
Japanese - 1,338 dead, 50 PoW = 1,388 casualties
Americans - 260 KIA, 1,354 WIA = 1,614 casualties

Peleliu:
Japanese - 10,500 dead, 200 PoW = 10,700 casualties
Americans - 1,800 KIA, 8,000 WIA = 9,800 casualties
 
And as you can see I countr only bloody losses (most of Japanese PoW were wounded), I don't count "combat fatigue", which would even increase US casualties. Another thing is that large part of Japanese deaths resulted from suicide or occured during the last "mopping up" stages of these battles.


Edited by Domen - 25-Jun-2010 at 05:00
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  Quote Cryptic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25-Jun-2010 at 07:58
Originally posted by Domen

Sorry but American machine guns could not compete with MG 42, which was the basic weapon of every German infantry team.
Granted, the MG 42 was by ar the best weapon in its class. Though not as sexy as the  MG-42, the American Garand rifle and the Browning Automatic Rifle were far superior to their German equivelants. The BAR in particular, had no German equivelant.
 
Likewise, the .45 calibre Thompson submachine gun was easily equivelant to German weapons (if not superior due to the .45 calibre round). Then factor in the legendary Browning .50 Calibre Machine Gun (often used by infantry units). There was no German equivelant to this weapon either.
 
In the end, the U.S. had a love affair with small arms leading to good indigenous designs and was also not shy about importing the best foreign designs.  This made a very lethal combination. Even the U.S. .30 calibre machine gun was not a bad weapon per se.
Originally posted by Domen

In other battles mentioned above casualty ratio was also favorable for the Japanese under the circumstances...
 
And as you can see I countr only bloody losses (most of Japanese PoW were wounded), I don't count "combat fatigue", which would even increase US casualties. Another thing is that large part of Japanese deaths resulted from suicide or occured during the last "mopping up" stages of these battles.
 
I think you have a pretty creative interpertation of statistics. America forces had up to a 8-1 kill ratio in their favor.  That is the key statistic and this alone demonstrates American efficiency. Creatively counting wounded means everybody from serious wounds to lightly wounded.  Your points about Japanese suicides increasing artifially increasing the high U.S. kill ratio are valid. But in the end, an enemy KIA via suicide is still an enemy KIA.
Originally posted by Domen

It took less than one month to secure the island
The fact that the U.S. won is not surprising.  The very efficient and very lethal U.S. Marines reduced their opponents at Iwo Jima far more quickly than the Wermacht did facing similar situations at Sebastpol and Stalingrad.  
Originally posted by Domen

Counterattacks are indispensible parts of every defense (and very costly for the defender) + position of an attacker is much more favourable than position of a defender in many aspects. Also enemy firepower (especially artillery and air attacks) hurts while being on the defensive.
I understand your point. I do not dispute that the German's had the best performance in WWII on a unit by unit average.  What I dispute is the degree which you insinuate that the American military was inferior.


Edited by Cryptic - 25-Jun-2010 at 09:53
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  Quote Domen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25-Jun-2010 at 10:30
The BAR in particular, had no German equivelant.
 
The equivalent of BAR in German army was MG 42 (used as light machine gun) because just like each American infantry team had got one BAR, each German infantry team had got one MG 42 used as light machine gun. MG 42 was so universal that it could be used both as light machine gun and as heavy machine gun - there were some difference in additional stuff between them (for example MG 42 when used as HMG had got heavier basis, bigger ammo store, etc.).
 
Creatively counting wounded means everybody from serious wounds to lightly wounded. 
 
This category includes only wounded which required hospitalization, so they were casualties because they had to leave their units for a long time. Slightly wounded which did not require hospitalization were usually counted as "contused" or "injured" and as such they were not casualties.
 
But in the end, an enemy KIA via suicide is still an enemy KIA.
 
Suicide is not killed in action because they were not commiting suicides while in action.
 
I'm not talking about Banzai charges but about self-inflicted deaths (seppuku for example).
 
 The very efficient and very lethal U.S. Marines reduced their opponents at Iwo Jima far more quickly than the Wermacht did facing similar situations at Sebastpol and Stalingrad.  
 
Stalingrad and Sevastopol were urban combats (Okinawa on the other hand is not a city) and in both battles their enemy was numerically superior - unlike Japanese on Okinawa. Near Sevastopol Russians had got several defensive lines of concrete fortifications and they could be supplied via sea - Okinawa could not be supplied via sea (they were encircled from all sides) and did not have concrete fortifications (only some underground shelters).
 


Edited by Domen - 25-Jun-2010 at 11:12
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  Quote opuslola Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25-Jun-2010 at 14:25
Not wanting to interfere with a very good discussion, I would suggest that bunkers dug into rock, which was a good portion of the Nipponese defensive line at Okinawa, provides or probvided every bit as good a defensive position as concrete!
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  Quote Maximus Germanicus I Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Jun-2010 at 00:39

Domen-

 

It is time to educate you on military principles.

 

In the offensive-What is the troop ratio normally required? 3 to 1

 

In the offensive vs a defense in depth with a dug in opponent 5 to 1

 

So to compare the US army vs a dug in German army with considerable advantages in terrain the US actually doctrinally outperformed the German army.

 

By comparing the US and German Army on equal footing in Europe shows a lack of knowledge of Military principles.

Another comment was made about the performance of US conscript troops and only the elite division doing well. Once again that shows a lack of knowledge of the American Army during WW2-Pretty much everybody was a conscript to include the 101st they were stood up in 42.

The US Army of World War II was created from a tiny antebellum army in the space of three years. On 30 June 1939 the Regular Army numbered 187,893 men, including 22,387 in the Army Air Corps. On the same date the National Guard totaled 199,491 men. The major combat units included nine infantry divisions, two cavalry divisions, a mechanized cavalry (armor) brigade in the Regular Army and eighteen infantry divisions in the National Guard

 

On 7 December 1941 the Army consisted of 1,685,403 men (including 275,889 in the Air Corps) in 29 infantry, five armor, and two cavalry divisions. While this 435 percent increase was a magnificent achievement .Over the following three and a half years the Army expanded a further 492 percent, to 8,291,336 men in 89 divisions: sixty-six infantry, five airborne, sixteen armored, one cavalry, and one mountain infantry. http://www.militaryhistoryonline.com/wwii/usarmy/introduction.aspx

 
So in a time if two years the Army increased by about 1.2 million soldiers (all of whom were conscripts. Then by 44 by another 8 Mill --where do you think they came from?

 

Just remember the 101st at Bastogne surrounded and out numbered then remember "Nuts"

 

 



Edited by Maximus Germanicus I - 26-Jun-2010 at 00:41
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  Quote Maximus Germanicus I Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Jun-2010 at 00:54

I will give you the MG42 was the finest machine gun in the war. As the Tiger was the finest Tank of the war-as a former cav guy it makes my mouth water.

 

Now as who has the best Army of the 20th Century--US circa 1990. They were farther ahead of any Army in the world. They held a technological training and doctrinal advantage over their next closet rival far superior than any other Army in the 2oth century. Germany was good, but Britain was close, Russia was close, The US was not at the start of the war, but by 45 was the most powerful Army in the world.

 

I get it-I like the Wehrmacht also- I had ancestors on both the German and the American side. I respect the German Army, The soldiers. I don't think highly of the general staff. They were to fixated, punished initiative, and were really more just Hitler’s sycophants. You put competent Generals in charge (Hell if Patton was a German) they would have won the war.

 

The German army was not designed to slug it out the were designed to hit quick break the enemy and exploit the confusion (due to speed, precision and technological advantages). When the German Army had to slug it out they suffered.

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  Quote Maximus Germanicus I Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Jun-2010 at 01:03
Originally posted by opuslola

Not wanting to interfere with a very good discussion, I would suggest that bunkers dug into rock, which was a good portion of the Nipponese defensive line at Okinawa, provides or probvided every bit as good a defensive position as concrete!
 

You are correct sir!!!!

 

The 1st, 2nd, and 6th Marine Divisions wheeled south across the narrow waist of Okinawa. The 1st and 6th Infantry Divisions encountered fierce resistance from Japanese troops holding fortified positions on high ground and engaged in desperate hand to hand combat in west-central Okinawa along Cactus Ridge, about five miles (8 km) northwest of Shuri.  for it was now realized they were merely outposts guarding the Shuri Line.

The next American objective was Kakazu Ridge, two hills with a connecting saddle that formed part of Shuri's outer defenses. The Japanese had prepared their positions well and fought tenaciously. Fighting was fierce. Japanese soldiers hid in fortified caves armed with hidden machine guns and explosives; American forces often lost many men before clearing the Japanese out from each cave or other hiding place.

Elements of Japanese Power  http://www.history.army.mil/books/wwii/okinawa/chapter10.htm
As the Americans came up against the Shuri line veteran fighters in the Pacific noted many familiar tactics and techniques in the Japanese defense. Intricate and elaborate underground positions, expert handling of light mortars and machine guns, fierce local attacks, willingness of Japanese soldiers to destroy themselves when cornered, aggressive defense of reverse slopes, full exploitation of cover and concealment, ceaseless efforts to infiltrate the lines-all these were reminiscent of previous battles with the Japanese from Guadalcanal to Leyte.
 
The enemy had shown all his old ingenuity in preparing his positions underground. Many of the underground fortifications had numerous entrances connected by an intricate system of tunnels. In some of the larger hill masses his tunneling had given him great maneuverability where the heaviest bombs and shells could not reach him. Such underground mobility often enabled him to convert an apparent defensive operation into an offensive one by moving his troops through tunnels into different caves or pillboxes and sometimes into the rear of attacking forces. Most remarkable was the care he had lavished on positions housing only one or two weapons. In one place a 47-mm. antitank gun
JAPANESE FORTIFICATIONS

 

 
Photo: 12-cm. British gun in concrete emplacement

12-cm. British gun in concrete emplacement

Photo: Concrete pillbox in hillside

Concrete pillbox in hillside

Photo: Double pillbox, earth and bamboo

Double pillbox, earth and bamboo

Photo: Tank trap across a road

Tank trap across a road

Photo: Reverse-slope caves, two levels

Reverse-slope caves, two levels

 

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Maximus Germanicus I View Drop Down
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Joined: 26-Jun-2010
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  Quote Maximus Germanicus I Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Jun-2010 at 01:10
Originally posted by opuslola

Not wanting to interfere with a very good discussion, I would suggest that bunkers dug into rock, which was a good portion of the Nipponese defensive line at Okinawa, provides or probvided every bit as good a defensive position as concrete!
 

Are sure Domen isn't really SoD. These are some silly and un researched  statements. Okinawa most certainly did have concrete. Further you are right the caves were better emplacements. On top of that it was an amphibious landing!!!! Much harder than the Germans faced on the east.

 

Amphib

Vs dug in enemy

with dug in ARTY

Mixed urban/mountainous and wooded terrain

 

Eastern front

Some Urban mostly open warfare on an open plain

 

HMM I wonder which is harder.

[260]

Photo: SOUTHERN COAST LINE
SOUTHERN COAST LINE of Okinawa is marked by jumbled masses of rock and vegetation, fronted by wide reefs. Cliff in picture is over 50 feet high.

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