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Admiral YI Sun Shin

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  Quote Easternknight Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Admiral YI Sun Shin
    Posted: 05-Jun-2007 at 14:18

In the 15th century, under the lead of King Sejong, who was himself a pioneer of scientific research, the performance of these heavy artillery improved dramatically. Having built a cannon range next to the Royal Court, and after much experimentation and study, King Sejong finally increased the extent of the cannons firepower from 300m (980 ft) to 1800m (60,000 ft). Naval canons were also developed at this time and among them, Heaven, Earth, Black and Yellow cannon were later employed by Yi Sun-sin. The development of artillery steadily continued after King Sejong, and saw the invention of the Bikeokjinchonlae, a time-bomb that flung out hundreds of metal shards upon explosion, and the Dapoki, a machine capable of firing many arrows at once.

   The main naval strategy employed by the Japanese was that of "grapple-and-board", whereby sailors would attempt to board an enemy ship and fall to sword fighting on the decks. The Japanese Navy's concept of sea battle was therefore one of a fight between crews rather than the vessels themselves. This was the most common naval strategy in the world during this time, and was as common among the Europeans of the day. The Korean Navy, however, utilizing superior warships and firepower to burn and sink the enemy vessels, thus engaged in a more modern type of naval warfare.

 

Comparison between Korean and Japanese Warships

 

Korean Warship

Japanese Warship

Hull

U-shaped with level base. Quick to change direction thanks to small turning radius V-shaped. Greater potential for speed, but large turning radius.

Crew

Panokson: 120-200
Kobukson: 150
Atake: 200-300
Sekibune: 100
Kobaya: 40

Speed

3 knots 3 knots minimum

Sail

Multiple-masts: sails could be used both windward and downwind Square-sail: limited to downwind use

Timber

Pine and Oak Japanese Cedar and Fir

Joints

Wooden nail: expands in water to strengthen overall structure Metal nail: corrodes in water weakening overall structure

Main Weapon

Heavy artillery: range 500m (1,650 ft)
Fire-arrows
Muskets: range 200m (660ft)
Spears, swords, arrows

Method of Attack

Breaching enemy hulls
Burning and sinking enemy ships
Grappling and Boarding
Killing and wounding enemy crews
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  Quote Easternknight Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05-Jun-2007 at 14:18

The Warships and Weaponry of Korea and Japan

During the Seven Year War, the Korean navy used both Panokson and Kobukson warships. The Panokson was the mainstay of the navy, while one to three Kobukson at would be used as the main assault ships. The ships of the Japanese navy consisted of the large Atake, the medium-sized Sekibune and the smaller Kobaya. The Atake served as the flagship, carrying on board the commanding admirals, while the medium-sized Sekibune comprised the greater part of the rest of the navy.

A key feature of the Korean Panokson was its multiple decks. The non-combatant personnel were positioned between the main-deck and the upper-deck, away from enemy fire. The combatant personnel were stationed on the upper-deck, which allowed them to attack the enemy from a higher vantage point. The Japanese fleet serviced mostly single-decked vessels, with the exception of a few large Atake.

In line with the traditional structure of Korean ships, the Panokson had a flat base. This feature was due to the nature of the Korean seacoast, which had a broad tidal range and flat, expansive tidelands. A level underside enabled a ship to sit comfortably on the tideland when the tide was out, after coming ashore or inside a wharf at high water. It also ensured greater mobility and a light draft and in particular allowed a ship to make sharp changes of direction at short notice. This Panokson was one of the main reasons why Admiral Yi was able to employ the Crane Wing formation at the Battle of Hansan with such success.

By contrast, the hulls of the Japanese vessels were V-shaped. A sharp underside was favorable for swift or long-distance travel because of lower water resistance. Since this variety of hull had a deep draft, however, the ships turning radius was considerable and changing direction was therefore a lengthy process.

Both Korean and Japanese ships used sails and oars. Of the two basic types of sail, square and lateen, the square gives a strong performance downwind but struggles windward, whereas the fore-and-aft lateen sail excels against the wind, though requiring a large crew to handle it. In the West, square sails were used in the galleys of Ancient Greece and the Viking longships, and the fore-and-aft variety later in the Mediterranean ships of the Late Middle Ages. When the Age of Exploration began in the fifteenth century, multiple-masted ships equipped with both types of sails eventually appeared. In Korea such ships had been in use since the eighth century. Koreas Panokson and Kobukson therefore had two masts by default, and their position and angle could easily be managed so that the sails could be used in all winds, whether adverse or favorable[2]. The Atake of the Japanese Navy also had two masts, but the main parts of its vessels were square-rigged and their sails limited to use in favorable winds.

It is worthwhile also to compare the hulls of the two nations respective warships, and their relative strength. The Panokson used thick, high density boards, giving an overall sturdiness to the ships structure. Japanese warships were weaker, due to the thin, lower density timber used to build them[3]. The Sekibune in particular, being the standard warship of the Japanese fleet, was built to be as light as possible, increasing its speed at the expense of structural integrity.

The Panokson was not only built using thicker timbers, but its general structure was held together by means of wooden nails, matching indentations, and interlocking teeth. This meant that as its boards absorbed water and expanded, the greater integrity of the hull was made stronger. The Japanese warships, on the other hand, relied on metal nails which, as time passed and corrosion and rust set in, eventually weakened the hull.

This difference in structural integrity, which also determined the number of cannons that could be carried on board, suited Japan and Korea to different types of naval combat. Because the Japanese ships lacked the strength to withstand the recoil of cannon, even the largest ship Atake could carry only three at the most. Since the hulls of Korean warships were strong enough, however, they were able to carry a large number of long-range cannons. These could be installed with ease on the large upper-deck of the Panokson ships, and their angle configured at will to increase the range.

Since the Japanese warships only allowed for a very limited number of cannons, their sailors mainly used muskets, which had a range of 100-200m (330-660 ft). Korea, on the other hand, had on board several varieties of cannon, such as Heaven, Earth, Black and Yellow. They fired daejon (a long, thick arrow in the shape of a rocket) with a range of 500m (1,650 ft), as well as chulwhan (cannon shot) which could travel up to a distance of 1km (3300 ft). Wangu, a kind of mortar, which fired stones or shells with a radius of 20cm (7.8 in), was also used by the Korean navy.

Another noteworthy aspect of Koreas heavy fire-arms is that they were not all invented to meet the sudden emergency of war. These weapons in fact made their appearance some 200 years prior to the Seven Year War. Thanks to the efforts of Choi Mu-son, a general and a chemist, Korea began manufacturing and developing gunpowder and power-based weapons. Korean cannons first saw action in 1380 against a large fleet of Japanese pirate ships, and were found to be a great success. In comparison, the first naval battle to have employed cannons in Europe was the Battle of Lepanto (1571), 200 years later.

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  Quote Easternknight Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05-Jun-2007 at 14:17

17

3/4/1594

Jinhae

30

10

10 enemy ships sunk

18

3/5/1594

Tanghangpo

124

50

21 enemy ships sunk

19

9/29/1594

Changmunpo

50

117

2 enemy ships sunk

20

9/16/1597

Myongnyang

13

330

31 enemy ships sunk

90 enemy ships severely damaged

21

7/18/1598

Choli-do

?

100

50 enemy ships sunk

22

9/20/1598

Chang-do

211 (Korea 83 + China 128)

?

30 enemy ships sunk

11 enemy ships captured

23

11/18/1598

Noryang

146 (Korea 83 + China 63)

500

450 enemy ships sunk

Won Kyun was instated as the Supreme Naval Commander in Yis place while he served as a common foot soldier, and led three sea battles which ended in the Korean Navys worst catastrophe.

 

 

Date

 

Location

Korean Ships

Japanese Ships

Outcome

1

07/07/1597

Cholyong-do

168

500

7 Korean ships

sunk & captured

2

07/09/1597

Kadok

161

1000

27 Korean ships

sunk & captured

3

07/16/1597

Chilchonnyang

134

1000

122 Korean ships

sunk & captured

All dates are based on lunar calendar, which was used in East Asia until the late nineteenth century.

 

In addition to the 23 sea battles, several minor engagements took place. These include an assault by the Korean Navy on the Japanese naval base, and its successful defense of its own camp from the Japanese.

 

 

Date
Month/Day/Year
Location Korean Ships Japanese Ships Outcome

1*

2/10/1593

~3/6/1593

Woongchon

89

40

Japan: 100 casualties

 

2

1594-10.-4.

Changmumpo

50

?

Japanese Retreat

3

8/28/1597

Eoranjin

12

8

Japanese Retreat

4

9/7/1597

Byukpajin

12

13

Japanese Retreat

5

11/13/1598

Chang-do

146

(Korea 83+

China 63)

10

Japanese Retreat

 

* The number of ships involved and the outcome of each naval engagement as shown in the charts have been taken from Admiral Yis War Diary and Memorials to Court, as well as from the Royal Archives of the Choson Dynasty, the official record of the government.

* Throughout the Seven Year War, the Korean Navy under Admiral Yi suffered some casualties but lost no ships; only two ships were lost by the mistake of captains on their way back to the base after the engagement at Woongchon. Such overwhelming victories by the Korean Navy may be attributed to the structural integrity of their ships, built in durable design and material, and the superior firepower and range of their naval artillery. The Japanese armed their vessels with only one to three cannons with much less firepower, and their main weaponry, muskets were effective in killing enemy sailors but not in destroying enemy ships. Yi thus utilized the strategy of sinking the enemy warship with concentrated cannon-fire before the distance between their ships had narrowed down to the musket range of 200m. In short, the Korean Navy could achieve successes unparalleled in the history of naval warfare due to Yis forceful strategy based on the superiority of Korean ships and guns.

* Of the twenty-three battles Yi had fought, the largest and the fiercest was the Battle of Noryang, the final engagement that put the 146 ships of Korea and China against the 500 of Japan carrying back their entire army on retreat home. The long, seven-year war, originating from the delusive ambition of a man in search for fame and territory, had taken away countless innocent lives and utterly destroyed their homeland. Boarding every supply and weapon he had onto warships, Yi headed for Noryang to carry out his final duty for his country and people. He took off his armor and helmet and fought at the heart of the battle, firing arrows and beating the war drums himself. He had never before taken off his armor or helmet in action. Perhaps it had been his resolve to end his difficult, arduous life with this last victory at sea. When he died by an enemy bullet, neither his crews nor the Chinese Navy knew of his death. They poured their hearts and souls into defeating the enemy till the very end and achieved the resounding victory that saw the sinking of 450 Japanese warships out of 500. It was the most honorable and precious victory for the Korean Navy earned in sacrifice of the admirals life.

With his last breath, he said, Tell no one of my death. He was concerned that his death might encumber the fighting against the enemy.

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  Quote Easternknight Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05-Jun-2007 at 14:13

The Admiralship of Yi Sun-sin

Following are some of the key features of Admiral Yi Sun-sins leadership, which lay behind every legendary naval victory that he won.

1. Thorough preparation and intensive training

Before the war and throughout it, and even during the truce, Admiral Yi always subjected his men to intensive training in archery, artillery, and the various standard naval maneuvers and formations. He also tirelessly engaged himself in manufacturing new weapons and building ships. For example, only a year after the Battle of Myongnyang which he fought with a mere thirteen ships, he had succeeded in building 70 more an astonishing rate of one new ship every five days.

2. Careful study of the nature of the battlefield and its layout

The southern coast of Korea, the scene of many fierce sea battles between Korea and Japan during the Seven Year War, was a maritime labyrinth, consisting of countless isles and inlets. Furthermore, the current is very fast and the long stretching coast provided a completely different appearance with the rise and fall of every tide. Yi made a careful study of the hourly changes of currents and winds, as well as the natural features peculiar to each naval battlefield. Based on his investigations, he was able to rely on a safe sea-route whenever he moved his fleet by night escaping the eye of the enemy. As evident from the battles fought at Hansan and Myongnyang, his foreknowledge allowed him to turn the complex geographical features of the coast to his advantage when pursuing or being pursued by an enemy.

3. Diverse use of naval tactics

Admiral Yi used a wide variety of naval tactics in sea battles besides the famous Crane Wing Formation. In his first battle at Okpo, he arranged his fleet in horizontal line and made straight for the enemy fleet at full speed, thus not allowing them the least room to maneuver or escape and pressing them close with fierce cannon fire. In the sea battle at Pusan, the Long Snake Formation (Kor. Chang Sa Jin) was used in order to deal with the formidable odds 83 Korean ships against 480 Japanese. Yi adopted this long, narrow formation to minimize the exposure of his fleet to the enemys fire. Korea emerged victorious from this battle, sinking 128 enemy ships and losing none herself. In the Battle of Happo, Yis fleet droved the enemy fleet into a confined harbor, and was thus able to destroy all of its ships. In that engagement, Yi had no need to use formal naval formations, but simply ordered his ships to dash forward individually against the enemy as he judged fit. 

 

4. Undermining enemy morale and winning the trust of his men

 

  During naval engagements, Yis navy subjected the enemy to a bombardment of arrows and cannon shot from the outset, a tactic which proved highly effective in weakening the enemys fighting morale, and finally getting the better of them. As a consequence, Korean sailors developed an absolute trust in their admiral, and their morale grew higher and higher with every victory to which he led them.

5. Maintaining perfect discipline and strict principles

Lazy officers were rewarded with strokes of the cudgel, regardless of their rank. Soldiers who deserted the army were punished with death, as were officers who accepted bribes and overlooked their desertion, and indeed any man who was found to have committed the same crime more than once. At the Battle of Myongnyang, Yi angrily reproved An Wi, who had fallen back out of fear, threatening him with death under court martial if he did not heed his call to advance, and his words awakened An Wi to recover his spirit and fight. Admiral Yis emphasis on strict obedience to martial law and the maintenance of absolute discipline meant that the whole Korean Navy, from the supreme commander to the common soldier, were firmly united as one and were thus able to carry out naval formations and tactics which demanded strong unity among crew members successfully.

6. Fellowship and Duty

Although Chinese Admiral Chen Lien had attempted to hinder Yis plan to destroy the retreating Japanese force, the admiral rescued Chen when he was encircled by enemy ships at Noryang, and in danger of being captured. In the Battle of Myongnyang, An Wi abandoned his loyalty to his commander at the sight of the enemys overwhelming numbers, but was later saved by the admiral when he fell into trouble. Yi was always faithful to his principles and would not permit injustice or irresponsibility in his men. But at the same time, he harbored a deep sense of fellowship and obligation to them and so gained their trust, respect and devoted service.

7. Leadership overcame the worst conditions

Throughout the Seven Year War, Admiral Yi alone undertook to provide for every aspect of warfare, from supplies and provisions to recruitment and shipbuilding, having no support from the government. In battles where overwhelming odds were involved, he led his navy from the front to inspire his men with his valor and zeal. In the desperate situation before the Battle of Myongnyang, when the Korean Navy had only thirteen ships with which to fight, Yi was able to re-arm his men, with the dauntless soldiers maxim He who seeks death will live, and he who seeks life will die.

Behind all these methods and devices lie Yis unshakable loyalty and selfless dedication to his country and people. In the course of abiding by them, Yi had to endure endless trials and sufferings. He remained loyal to his country, however, even after imprisonment, torture, and ignominious demotion to the ranks, since he firmly believed that remaining at sea and defeating the enemy was the one thing he could do for his nation. It is this splendid patriotic devotion that could be seen as the most powerful and important strategy of Admiral Yi Sun-sin.

Naval Battles of Admiral Yi Sun-sin

During the Seven Year War, Yi Sun-sin had engaged in twenty-three naval battles against Japan and emerged victorious in all of them. The naval battles fought by the Admiral can be summarized in a chart as follows.

Edited by Omar al Hashim - 18-Aug-2007 at 03:27
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  Quote King Kang of Mu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-Jun-2007 at 01:37
Originally posted by Intranetusa

Korean reunification? Anyone?

 
Well, it really doesn't matter. In the future, due to the powers of globalization, world cultures will meld together into a single mega-culture.

Woorieh Sowoneun Tong Il.  Ggoomedo Sowoneun Tong Il.....
http://www.allempires.net/forum/forums.html
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  Quote Sarmat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-Jun-2007 at 19:24
Yi Sun Shin is the greatest Korean hero. The man saved his country. He is not Drake, I would call him "Nelson of the East", I think this name fits him better than Togo.
 
I especially like the story how he shot Japanese admiral with the bow.
 
My deepest respect to this brave man ! Clap


Edited by Sarmat12 - 03-Jun-2007 at 19:27
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  Quote Intranetusa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-May-2007 at 23:07

Korean reunification? Anyone?

 
Well, it really doesn't matter. In the future, due to the powers of globalization, world cultures will meld together into a single mega-culture.


Edited by Intranetusa - 23-May-2007 at 23:08
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  Quote LuckyNomad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18-May-2007 at 02:15
Not neccessarily. Korea's preference for FTA with many countries will ensure that no single country will dominate Korea in the future. During the late 19th century, some people in the 이 Dynasy wanted Korea to have strong relations with many foreign powers, so that nobody could dominate Korea, but it didn't work because few countries cared about Korea. Today, Korea has a large economy, so many countries want to trade with Korea.  I wouldn't consider Korea to be the puppet of the US. The US is the best partner for Korea because the US is very far away, unlike Japan, China, or Russia. 
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  Quote pekau Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18-May-2007 at 00:28
In the end, Korea will be mere puppet to the foreign powers... how sad is that?
     
   
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  Quote LuckyNomad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-May-2007 at 22:32

Because of Korea's geography, it is fated to never be the strongest country in Asia. Today, Korea is very strong economically and it is secure because of the US alliance. But I think that in the future, Korea will once again weaken because South Korea will have to absorb the big garbage can in the north.(North Korea). By that time, China will be much stronger than it is today. After unification, Korea will probably have a very small military again. This is why Korea should keep it's alliance with the US.

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  Quote pekau Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-May-2007 at 22:14
Originally posted by LuckyNomad

What I meant to say was, that the turtle ships did not have any metal plating on top. They only had metal spikes.
EasternKnight, where did you get that Japanese quote? Is it actually in Japanese or is it an english translation of a quote?
 
 
There are some studies hinting that there was metal plating, but it didn't cover all the ship... it merely covered the commanding post or the place where the captains usually were stationed.
 
Originally posted by LuckyNomad

Pekau, I don't think that the Joseon Navy would be much use in the 19th century. Even if the Joseon Nobility had wanted to modernize, the Yangban would not want to move to industrialization because they were too set on agriculture because they owned all the land.
 

I know, but it will be cool for us to have a powerful navy like Britain had. Then we can be the Far East's shopkeepers...
 
Even if we had the navy, the Ming would pressure Joseon to stop naval dominance. Sigh, we never had a thrilling moments in history since the downfall of Balhe...
 
 
     
   
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  Quote LuckyNomad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-May-2007 at 21:49
What I meant was, what is your source? Is it a website or a book? If the source that your reading is written in english, than it could be a mistranslation.
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  Quote Easternknight Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-May-2007 at 20:55
"One Japanese record of 'Ship-Battles in Korea' includes a description of a battle as experienced by two Japanese commanders on 1592, three weeks after Yi Sun-sin's having described the features of his turtle boats. The relevant part reads:"
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  Quote LuckyNomad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-May-2007 at 19:47
What I meant to say was, that the turtle ships did not have any metal plating on top. They only had metal spikes.
EasternKnight, where did you get that Japanese quote? Is it actually in Japanese or is it an english translation of a quote?
 
Pekau, I don't think that the Joseon Navy would be much use in the 19th century. Even if the Joseon Nobility had wanted to modernize, the Yangban would not want to move to industrialization because they were too set on agriculture because they owned all the land.
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  Quote pekau Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-May-2007 at 18:20
True, Panokseon was the backbone of the small Joseon navy. Very few turtle ships were produced, since Joseon's industrial areas have been devastated by Japanese land forces... which caused mass production of any type of warships to be impossible. This is one of the main reason why Japanese navy always outnumbered Joseon navy.
 
About my earlier post, I was referring to all Joseon ships. Panokseons were designed for sea warfare with harsh current, and they did possess cannons much more superior compared to Japanese cannons.
 
I heard about the produced their own prototype cannon, but by the time Imjin War began... Chinese (Ming) cannons were the best.
 
It tears me apart to hear that all turtle warships managed to survive in current world. It would have been some sight if Joseon's government recovered and starting governing seriously. What if Joseon had fleet.... no, fleets of turtle ships for close range attack with gigantic Panokseon as long range artillary? It will be so cool....
 
 
     
   
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  Quote Easternknight Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-May-2007 at 14:32
"...About 8 o'clock in the morning the enemy fleet (Yi Sun-sin's fleet), composed of 58 large ships and about 50 small ships, began to make an attack on ours. Three of the large ones were blind ships (turtle-boats) covered with iron."
 
 
This is a Japanese source. Whether or not the turtle Boats were Iron-Covered no one knows. As it is The Japanese Tekkosen as I understand it were upgraded Japanese ships of an already exsisting class and were seen as floating fortresses rather then an sea-worthy vessel. [ from whative read on several sources at least]
 
Also The Turtleships were extremely overated it was the Panokseon that were in every battle. Also Didn't Korea develop its own cannons during late Koryo and under Sejong im sure Ming were basic models for several types but still.


Edited by Easternknight - 17-May-2007 at 14:33
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  Quote pekau Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-May-2007 at 07:01
Originally posted by LuckyNomad

As far as I've read, there is no proof that the Kobuksan were even iron clad. It's only certain that they had metal spikes on top, but the hull were probably just made of very strong wood that the Japanese cannons could not penetrate.
 
Oh no, Kobuksan (Turtle ship) was not really an ironclad ship. They had metal roof with spikes to prevent Japanese warriors to jump into the Korean ships. Once Japanese land on Korean ship, they are dead. (Samurai are more skilled in close combat in general, and Japanese had lot more men than Koreans in sea warfare.)
 
Actually, the hull was not strong enough to withstand Japanese cannon. In fact, Korean ships had little better hull to withstand the current of the water, something that Japanese lacked (Since they are used to fight in bodies of water near the shores or rivers) and reduced their mobility.
 
There are two reasons how Yi Sunshin became a legend. Korean ships outmaneuvered Japanese ships in harsh water current. As well, Koreans adapted the superior Ming cannon that fired more rapidly, and had much longer range compared to Japanese cannons.
 
So all Koreans had to do is run along until Japanese found themselves crowded, and then bombard them with everthing they got. If some Japanese ships manage to get close enough... well, the Korean ships simply sail away and shoot them down. Since Koreans were more familiar with the geography of Korean Strait than Japanese, they easily led the Japanese ships to a trap. I heard that he even used iron chains to trap the Japanese ships in some combat.
 
Furthermore, Yi Sunshin was feared by Japanese so much that they often fled from Korean army even if they had some chance against him. Though they lost a lot of ships, I remember reading about a Japanese general who manage to escape Yi Sunshin's trap... and he still managed to pull out enough ships to have numerical advantage against Korean navy. Even though he was quite close to Korean navy, he retreated... thinking how could they possibly win if their entire fleet failed to do so. The psychological terror and appearant invincible Korean navy was enough for Japanese not to be able to show their best potential. Then again, Korean navy suffered defeat only once... and that was because Yi Sunshin was exiled at that time...
     
   
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  Quote LuckyNomad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-May-2007 at 23:26
As far as I've read, there is no proof that the Kobuksan were even iron clad. It's only certain that they had metal spikes on top, but the hull were probably just made of very strong wood that the Japanese cannons could not penetrate.
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  Quote pekau Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-May-2007 at 14:10
Originally posted by Ptino

Well according to Wikipedia, Yi Sun-Sin's Turtle Ships where the first metal ships used in the world.

"Yi is also known for his innovation of the Turtle ships, Turtle ships are the world first metal ship. early armoured warships".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yi_Sun-sin
 
This is the reason why you should avoid using wikipedia for any history-related work. Wink
 
Perhaps you should look into sources that are reliable. There's some vandalism Wikipedia can't buy. For everything else, there's Bad Jokes and Other Deleted Nonsense.


Edited by pekau - 16-May-2007 at 14:12
     
   
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  Quote Ptino Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-May-2007 at 12:46
Well according to Wikipedia, Yi Sun-Sin's Turtle Ships where the first metal ships used in the world.

"Yi is also known for his innovation of the Turtle ships, Turtle ships are the world first metal ship. early armoured warships".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yi_Sun-sin

Edited by Ptino - 16-May-2007 at 12:49
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