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Early African Architecture/Ruins

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  Quote Askia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Early African Architecture/Ruins
    Posted: 17-Mar-2014 at 19:25
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  Quote Askia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Mar-2014 at 19:26
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  Quote Askia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Mar-2014 at 19:28
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  Quote Askia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Mar-2014 at 19:28
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  Quote Askia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Mar-2014 at 23:16
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  Quote Askia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Mar-2014 at 23:19
“The population of Tandi a Vua may be estimated at 15,000 individuals, of whom two-thirds are women. The homes of the nobles are elegant and vast. The exterior walls of the Queen’s Palace are covered by a sort of moss which preserves them from the humidity of the rainy seasons, while their interior attics are ceiled with smooth posts set one against the other so as to appear as a single board: the reception room is vast and lit up by four windows whose squares are glazed with sheets of transparent mica. Five hundred Negroes constantly surround this palace: the beautifully sculpted main door is guarded by only three men, two are seated on their heels, one on one side and the other on the other side, are armed with a club, and the third is fully armed (see Table 44).” (p. 402).


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  Quote Askia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Mar-2014 at 23:21
Sketch of the plan of the great mosque of Timbuktu. 

"I visited the great mosque on the west side of the town; it is larger than that on the east, but it is built in the same style. The walls are in bad repair, their facing being damaged by the rains, which fall in the months of August and September, and which are always brought on by easterly winds, accompanied by violent storms. Several buttresses are raised against the wall to support them; I ascended the tower, though its staircase, which is internal, is almost demolished. . . . The western quarter of the mosque seems very ancient, but the whole facade on that side is in ruins. There are also some vaulted arcades, from which the whole of the plaster facing is detached. This mosque is constructed of sun-dried bricks, of nearly the same form as those made in Europe. The walls are rough-cast with a kind of coarse sand, similar to that of which the bricks are made, mixed with the gluten of rice. . . . The eastern part is composed of six galleries. . . . The walls of the mosque are fifteen feet high and twenty-five or twenty-six inches thick." - René Caillié (1799-1838), Travels Through Central Africa to Timbuctoo, and Across the Great Desert, to Morocco, Performed in the Years 1824-1828, Vol. 2, pp. 71-72. London, 1830.


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  Quote Askia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Mar-2014 at 23:23

“1, 2, 3: Details of the Great Mosque of Timbuctoo; 4, 5: Plan and Front of the House of Sidi Abdallah Chebir, in Which Mr. Caillié Resided”



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  Quote Askia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Mar-2014 at 23:24
View of Bassa


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  Quote Askia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Mar-2014 at 23:26

Caption translation: The Bamum chief in his audience court. Inside a round hall, with richly carved bars, Njoja sits. He is smoking a pipe, and youths and all of his attendants surround him. The throne is of estimable, old beadwork.



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  Quote Askia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Mar-2014 at 23:28

Caption translation: Attending court in the chief's palace in Fumban



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  Quote Askia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Mar-2014 at 23:30

Publication: 1917. Wuhrmann, Anna. Vier Jahre im Grasland von Kamerun.         

Entrance to the chief's compound



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  Quote Askia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Mar-2014 at 23:31

Publication: 1874. Skertchly, J.A. Dahomey as it is; Being A Narrative of Eight Month's Residence in that Country with a full account of the notorious annual customs, and the social and religious institutions of the Ffons. Also an appendix on Ashantee, and a Glossary of Dahoman Words and Titles.

 

The Gun Custom



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  Quote Askia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Mar-2014 at 23:33

Publication: 1874. Skertchly, J.A. Dahomey as it is; Being A Narrative of Eight Month's Residence in that Country with a full account of the notorious annual customs, and the social and religious institutions of the Ffons. Also an appendix on Ashantee, and a Glossary of Dahoman Words and Titles.



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  Quote Askia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18-Mar-2014 at 00:11

Old Dongola (Old Nubian: Tungul; Arabic: Dunqulah al-ʿAjūz‎) is a town in Sudan, on the east bank of the Nile opposite the Wadi Al-Malik. It is 50 miles (80 km) upstream from (New) Dongola. Old Dongola was the departure point for caravans west to Darfur and Kordofan.

 

It was an important city in Mediaeval Nubia. From the fourth to the fourteenth century it was the capital of the Makurian state. In the Fifth Century Old Dongola was founded as fortress, but became soon a town. Latest with the arrival of Christianity it became the capital. Several churches were built. There was the Building X and the Church with the Stone Pavement. There were erected about 100 m apart from the walled town centre, indicating that at this time the town already extended over the original walls of the fortress. In the middile of the Seventh century, the town was attacked by the Arabs, but was not conquered. However, the two main churches were destroyed, but shortly after rebuild. Building material of the Old Church was used for supporting the city walls.

 

The Building X was soon replaced by the Old Church.

 

The Church of the Granite Columns was erected at the end of the Seventh Century over the Old Church. It was perhaps the cathedral of Old Dongola and adorned with 16 granite columns. These columns had richly decorated granite capitals.

 

Around the Tenth century, Old Dongola had its heyday. At the place of the Church of the Stone Pavements, the Cruciform Church was erected. At this time Old Dongola had many other churches, at least two palaces, and in the North a huge monastery. Several houses were well equipped and had bath rooms and wall paintings.

 

In the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Century, the town lost importance. It was attacked by Arabs several times and the throne room of the palace was converted to a mosque.


Under the Funj, Old Dongola was the capital of the Northern provinces.


When the traveller C.J. Poncet travelled through the city, he described it as located on the slope of a sandy hill. His description of Old Dongola continues:


The houses are ill built, and the streets half deserted and fill'd with heaps of sand, occasion'd by floods from the mountains.

 

The castle is in the very center of the town. It is large and spacious, but the fortifications are inconsiderable. It keeps in awe the Arabians, who are masters of the open country

 

A Polish archaeological team has been excavating the town since 1964.



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  Quote Askia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18-Mar-2014 at 00:14








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  Quote Askia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18-Mar-2014 at 00:15

Many cemeteries in Sudan are characterized by the presence of some large conical-shaped tombs. They are called 'Qubba' and are used as a funerary monument for leading Muslim religious figures



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  Quote Askia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18-Mar-2014 at 00:17
Old Dongoloa Monastery








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  Quote Askia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18-Mar-2014 at 00:20
Tomb of Al-Mahdi, Sudan

 


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  Quote Askia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18-Mar-2014 at 00:33
Djenne







Interior of the great mosque of Djenne






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