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Confederate Blue and Yankee Grey

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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Confederate Blue and Yankee Grey
    Posted: 10-Jun-2012 at 05:44
Originally posted by Nick1986


Some late war confederate uniforms were such a dark shade of grey they were almost black. Officers tried to stop the men from wearing sky blue trousers out of fear they would be shot by their own side

Your information on the Peter Tait jackets and on blue trousers issued by the Confederate Army is incorrect. I could spend hours writing on these subjects.



Pictured above is an original Peter Tait jacket issued to Stonewall Jackson's Courier, Private Benjamin S. Pendleton and worn by him at the surrender at Appomattox. 

Two excellent reference books have been written on the Peter Tait jackets.


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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Jun-2012 at 05:58

This is a post Civil War Militia photograph.
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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Jun-2012 at 06:01
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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Jun-2012 at 06:08
Here's the other reference book on Peter Tait uniforms:



"Peter Tait was a true entrepreneur. He became the inventor of a new type of working practice - the production line, a new way of sewing garments where each person did a particular job, thereby making each garment quicker and easier to manufacture. The monograph tells the full story of his company - Peter Tait & Co of Limerick, Ireland - from its beginnings to becoming the biggest supplier of ready-made uniforms to the Confederate Government during the latter stages of the American Civil War. Just as importantly, this book casts doubt on the fact that all so-called 'Tait' jackets supplied to the Confederacy were indeed made by the Tait firm. It suggests that they were, in fact, a joint effort with the other major British supplier of military clothing of the day - namely Hebbert & Co of London. All the surviving 'Tait' style jackets are examined in detail, and are accompanied by exclusive photographs. Based on original invoices and extensive archival research, this is the complete story of both Tait, the man, and his company in becoming an official Supplier to the Confederacy."


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  Quote Nick1986 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Jun-2012 at 07:14
Originally posted by RaggedAssSecond

Originally posted by Nick1986


Some late war confederate uniforms were such a dark shade of grey they were almost black. Officers tried to stop the men from wearing sky blue trousers out of fear they would be shot by their own side

Your information on the Peter Tait jackets and on blue trousers issued by the Confederate Army is incorrect. I could spend hours writing on these subjects.



Pictured above is an original Peter Tait jacket issued to Stonewall Jackson's Courier, Private Benjamin S. Pendleton and worn by him at the surrender at Appomattox. 

Two excellent reference books have been written on the Peter Tait jackets.



Raggedasssecond, I'm impressed.Thumbs Up I thought it was common practise for Rebs to wear blue trousers taken off dead Yankees
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  Quote Nick1986 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Jun-2012 at 08:16
Originally posted by RaggedAssSecond


This is a post Civil War Militia photograph.

Any idea what regiment he's from? I've noticed similar jackets on military bandsmen and several New York militias (assuming he's not a French soldier)
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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Jun-2012 at 11:07
Originally posted by Nick1986

Originally posted by RaggedAssSecond


This is a post Civil War Militia photograph.

Any idea what regiment he's from? I've noticed similar jackets on military bandsmen and several New York militias (assuming he's not a French soldier)


Common militia uniform. Even though the photographer is identified, his location isn't. Nothing about his uniform indicates his being a bandsman.  If he were a French soldier, then the word "Photographer" would be in French.
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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Jun-2012 at 11:13
Originally posted by Nick1986

Originally posted by Nick1986


The soldier from the 7th NY has a similar uniform to your mystery man

The Hussar uniform of the 3rd NY has to be the most unusual, but the all-white uniform and English bearskin of the City Guards is equally interesting. I wonder if the 3rd NY was of French or Austro-Hungarian origin?


I would have to check, but I don't recall the 3rd New York wearing a Hussar style uniform.

The 3rd New Jersey Cavalry (Fighting Butterflies) did wear a Hussar style uniform. Here are some examples:


Unidentified soldier of the 3rd NJ Cavalry.


1st Lt. Henry A. Van Ness, 3rd NJ Cavalry.
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  Quote Nick1986 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Jun-2012 at 14:54
I'd be interested in what you find. The unidentified soldier's uniform does have some similarities with the Butterflies, but has more braid across the chest, a different hat, and different sleeve braid:
http://www.minecreek.org/standing-collar/pennsylvania.html
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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Jun-2012 at 15:19
Colonel (later General) Burnside wearing a variation of the blouse. Photograph was taken in 1861 when he commanded the 1st Rhode Island Infantry.
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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Jun-2012 at 15:59
Originally posted by Nick1986

I'd be interested in what you find. The unidentified soldier's uniform does have some similarities with the Butterflies, but has more braid across the chest, a different hat, and different sleeve braid:
http://www.minecreek.org/standing-collar/pennsylvania.html


Officer uniforms were private purchase and you will see some variations of them in comparison to those uniforms issued to the other ranks.

Many of the color plates posted in this thread come from Civil War uniform books authored by Philip Haythornthwaite. They are full of mistakes and not useful reference books for those seriously interested in Civil War uniforms.


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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Jun-2012 at 16:04
The 79th Regiment, New York State Militia went off to war wearing a highlanders uniform.










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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Jun-2012 at 16:13
Originally posted by Nick1986


Uniform of Watson's Flying Battery from New Orleans



The above photograph shows a reproduction uniform. The jacket is based off of newspaper descriptions of Watson's Fying New orleans Artillery used for the basis of a painting done by Don Troiani. No original uniform is known to exist.
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  Quote Nick1986 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Jun-2012 at 17:28
Originally posted by RaggedAssSecond

The 79th Regiment, New York State Militia went off to war wearing a highlanders uniform.












Smart uniforms, very close to our own Cameron Highlanders



Edited by Nick1986 - 10-Jun-2012 at 19:18
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  Quote Nick1986 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Jun-2012 at 19:08

Use of the pleated frock coat by what the caption claims is a Confederate from the Rhett Guard or Richland Rifles, part of the 1st South Carolina
http://www.cowanauctions.com/auctions/item.aspx?ItemId=22778
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  Quote Centrix Vigilis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Jun-2012 at 21:16
As usual some fine contributions and analysis. I welcome RaggedAssSecond's efforts and encourgae him to continue.
"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"

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Pilger's law: 'If it's been officially denied, then it's probably true'

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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Jun-2012 at 21:01



Artifact Description:CONFEDERATE SHELL JACKET; BLUE-GREY KERSEY, 1 PIECE BACK & 1 PIECE SLEEVES; LARGE BELT LOOPS,; 6 BUTTONHOLES ORIGINALLY, 5 EXTRA BUTTONHOLES ADDED.
Access#:1996.193.19
Artifact Class:CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES
Associations:MAY, ALFRED\USED BY --TRIO GUARD --61ST REGIMENT,NC TROOPS --MAY FAMILY/ASSOCIATED WITH --CIVIL WAR/ASSOCIATED WITH
Dimensions:[Lt]1' 10 5/8" [Wdt]1' 5 5/16"
Materials:WOOL
Date Made:1864-1865
Place Made:
Place Used:USA
Use History:THIS GARMENT WAS MANUFACTURED AS A MILITARY JACKET FOR USE IN THE CONFEDERATE ARMY. IT WAS ISSUED TO SGT. ALFRED MAY OF THE 61ST NORTH CAROLINA TROOPS SOMETIME IN THE LAST YEAR OF THE WAR AND WORN BY HIM UNTIL THE CONCLUSION OF THE CONFLICT. THE JACKET REMAINED IN HIS FAMILY UNTIL DONATED TO THE MUSEUM.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION: 
BLUE-GRAY KERSEY WOOL IN A FIVE PIECE BODY. NO CENTER BACK SEAM. SHORT STAND UP COLLAR. ORIGINALLY A SIX BUTTON FRONT, WITH FIVE BUTTON HOLES ADDED AT A LATER TIME. "CSA" BUTTONS ARE POST-WAR, STAMPED ON REAR "S. BUCKLEY & CO./ BIRMINGHAM". SLEEVES ARE ONE PIECE WITH SLIGHT GATHERING AT SHOULDERS. ELBOW IS WIDEST POINT OF SLEEVE. TWO BELT LOOPS ATTACH AT SIDES: 4 3/8 INCHES LONG, 1 1/2 INCHES WIDE AT TOP AND 2 INCHES WIDE AT BOTTON. TWO BREST POCKETS IN LINING, EACH HORIZONTAL. NO TRIM. ALL HAND SEWN. DETERIORATION DUE TO MOTHS CONCEALS THE ORIGINAL END OF THE COLLAR ON THE LEFT HAND SIDE.

HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE: 
RARE AND ATYPICAL EXAMPLE OF A CONFEDERATE MILITARY UNIFORM TUNIC.

Whoever stood in front of the corn field at Antietam needs no praise." . . . . . Rufus R. Dawes, 6th Wisconsin.
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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Jun-2012 at 21:10


Artifact Description:KERSEY TROUSERS; SKY BLUE; NORTHERN MADE/STANDARD ISSUE TO UNION INFANTRY; 1 BUTTON FRONT CLOSURE; WAIST ADJUSTABLE BY TAB IN BACK; POOR CONDITION; PROPER RIGHT LEG - AREA OF LOSS.
Access#:1996.193.20
Artifact Class:CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES
Associations:MAY, ALFRED --TRIO GUARD --61ST REGIMENT,NC TROOPS --MAY FAMILY/ASSOCIATED WITH --CIVIL WAR/ASSOCIATED WITH
Dimensions:[Lt]3' 5 3/4" [Wdt]1' 1 3/8"
Materials:WOOL
Date Made:1862-1865
Place Made:USA
Place Used:USA
Use History:THESE TROUSERS WERE MANUFACTURED FOR MILITARY USE IN THE CONFEDERATE ARMY. THEY WERE ISSUED TO SGT. ALFRED MAY OF THE 61ST REGIMENT NORTH CAROLINA STATE TROOPS AND WORN BY HIM UNTIL THE END OF THE WAR. KEPT BY HIS FAMILY UNTIL DONATED TO THE MUSEUM.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION: 
LIGHT BLUE KERSEY TWILL WOOL. BUTTON FLY WITH FIVE BUTTON CLOSURE; ONE METAL BUTTON REPLACED WITH A 1/4" WOODEN BUTTON. SIX BUTTONS AROUND WAISTBAND. BELT BACK TO ADJUST FIT. ONE PIECE WAISTBAND. BACK SEAM REPAIRED AT CROTCH; BELT BACK TABS SHORTENED BY BEING FOLDED AND STITCHED DOWN; HOLES IN RIGHT BACK AND RIGHT FRONT PATCHED WITH DARK BROWN TWILL WEAVE FABRIC. WAIST BAND LINING IS UNBLEACHED TWILL WEAVE LINEN. POCKET IS BROWN TWILL WEAVE LINEN.

HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE: 
RARE EXAMPLE OF CONFEDERATE MILITARY TROUSERS.

Whoever stood in front of the corn field at Antietam needs no praise." . . . . . Rufus R. Dawes, 6th Wisconsin.
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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Jun-2012 at 21:14

Alfred May, one of nine children of John and Elizabeth Tyson May, was born in Pitt County on March 24, 1843, in a home built by his father and the family slaves. The May land had been in family hands since before the American Revolution, and John had achieved success as a prosperous landholder. To work the land, he used both family and slave labor. The 1860 census indicated that John May owned twenty-eight slaves who ranged in age from four to fifty years. The census also listed Alfred, the youngest male in the family, as a student. No doubt John and Elizabeth May followed the secession crisis with close attention and concern, since they had sons of military age. John May died on May 25, 1861, just five days after North Carolina left the Union. Perhaps because of their father's death, the sons felt obligated to stay at home and care for their mother and sisters. However, in 1862 the war took the boys from the farm into Confederate service. First Robert enlisted on April 7, then Benjamin on May 6, and finally Alfred on August 25.

Alfred May left his Pitt County home in the summer of 1862 and traveled to Wilmington, where on August 25 he enlisted in Company F (Trio Guards), Sixty-first Regiment North Carolina Troops. He served in the same unit as his older brothers Robert and Benjamin May. The regiment fought in eastern North Carolina in 1862, and in 1863 it saw combat at Battery Wagner near Charleston. The following year, the Sixty-first North Carolina fought in several battles around Richmond. Benjamin suffered a wound to the head at Petersburg in July 1864, and Robert died in a Richmond hospital of unrecorded causes in October. The regiment participated in the last major battle of the war at Bentonville in March 1865. At some point in the war's final days or after the Confederate surrender, Alfred returned home and carefully put away his uniform, rifle, cartridge box, pistol, and many other items, including objects that he apparently carried home as battlefield souvenirs. The grouping of artifacts displayed here is unique. It is the largest extant collection of objects associated with a North Carolina Confederate enlisted soldier.

Alfred May returned home determined to prosper in postwar North Carolina, despite the loss of much of his family's wealth through the emancipation of their slaves. Gradually Alfred acquired land that had passed to other family members and consolidated the May holdings. On October 12, 1875, he married Ida Eugenia Wooten, and eventually they had eight children. When he died on March 29, 1906, Alfred was buried in the family cemetery, just a few hundred feet from his place of birth. The objects that Alfred May brought home from the Civil War passed down first to his children and then to his grandchildren as family treasures. They were displayed during family gatherings on special occasions, and the story of Alfred's war service was told. The May farm in Pitt County still remains in family hands today. In the early 1990s, Alfred May's grandchildren donated his Civil War artifacts to the North Carolina Museum of History.

Whoever stood in front of the corn field at Antietam needs no praise." . . . . . Rufus R. Dawes, 6th Wisconsin.
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  Quote Nick1986 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Jun-2012 at 21:27
That is a dark shade of grey (very close to the greatcoats and trousers issued to the British army). I'm not surprised late-war Confederates could be mistaken for Yankees as the US-issue sack coat was made of poor quality wool (shoddy) that quickly faded on campaign
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