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Confederate Blue and Yankee Grey

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  Quote Nick1986 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Confederate Blue and Yankee Grey
    Posted: 20-Jun-2012 at 19:12

South Carolina confederate in prewar Washington Infantry uniform
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  Quote Nick1986 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Jun-2012 at 19:24
Originally posted by RaggedAssSecond


The following link will take you to an article on Trans-Mississippi Confederate Uniforms and Part 2 deals with shirts. You will also enjoy the photographs which accompany the article.


Brothers Pvt. Thomas Duval & LT William Duval 3rd Missouri Infantry.

I like the Texan "circus rider shirt" in your link.Big smile Did any originals survive to the present day?
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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Jun-2012 at 18:12
Many units (North and South) went off to war in 1861 wearing battle shirts. At 1st Manassas the 6th Mississippi wore red shirts as per State regulations. The 2nd Mississippi wore gray shirts.

The 1st Minnesota wore battle shirts in 1861.
Whoever stood in front of the corn field at Antietam needs no praise." . . . . . Rufus R. Dawes, 6th Wisconsin.
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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Jun-2012 at 18:05

The following link will take you to an article on Trans-Mississippi Confederate Uniforms and Part 2 deals with shirts. You will also enjoy the photographs which accompany the article.

http://www.lazyjackmess.com/shirts.htm

Brothers Pvt. Thomas Duval & LT William Duval 3rd Missouri Infantry.


Edited by RaggedAssSecond - 19-Jun-2012 at 18:11
Whoever stood in front of the corn field at Antietam needs no praise." . . . . . Rufus R. Dawes, 6th Wisconsin.
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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18-Jun-2012 at 19:33

Pvt. Frederick Lythson, 2nd Wisconsin Infantry, wearing the Wisconsin militia gray frock coat and tall cap issued in the early days of the war. He was wounded at Gettysburg and transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps in 1864.
Whoever stood in front of the corn field at Antietam needs no praise." . . . . . Rufus R. Dawes, 6th Wisconsin.
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  Quote Nick1986 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18-Jun-2012 at 19:10
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  Quote Nick1986 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Jun-2012 at 19:25
The uniforms of the 2nd and 11th Virginia look almost identical. I heard there was a Minnesota regiment with similar battleshirts, but in red
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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Jun-2012 at 08:19
Piedmont Battle Shirts
Militia Uniforms of Central Virginia, 1859-1862.

Uniform Analysis by Rusty Hicks & Adam Scher

The uniform of the company will be made in Virginia of Virginia goods, the cloth being manufactured at Staunton; the suit made by our tailors; the caps by Sinzer..... Lynchburg Daily Virginian, January 24, 1860

John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry in October, 1859 caught the citizens of Lynchburg, Virginia unprepared. The city had been without organized militia since the disbanding of the Rifle Guard a few years before. As with other localities in the South, Brown's raid provided the spark for quick action. Beginning in November, the city organized one company each of infantry, riflemen, cavalry and artillery: the Lynchburg Home Guard, Rifle Greys, Wise Troop and Latham's Battery, respectively. Around the nucleus of these units, the city and surrounding counties formed similar units which in April, 1861 went into state service as companies of the 11th, 21st, and 42nd Regiments of Virginia Infantry and the 2nd Regiment of Virginia Cavalry, to name a few. Collectively, these regiments participated in nearly every event associated with the history of Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. We choose to focus on the experiences of the 11th Virginia Infantry because several of the images presented are of soldiers of this regiment, and also because that regiment was so closely identified with the citizens of Lynchburg .   

Like most militia units throughout the South, Lynchburg 's companies had armed and outfitted themselves with contributions from its members and the community. Although some southern states had uniform specifications for their militia, most gave companies the prerogative of selecting their own style of dress. As a result, many com­panies chose distinctive uniforms which were worn even after they had been mustered into Confederate service. Lynchburg's early war uniforms, including those worn by a prewar con­tingent of cadets from the old Lynch-burg College, appear from the photographic records to have made consonant use of a short-waisted shirt or jacket with a fold down, colored collar (unobscured or fashioned with a cravat), cuff facings, and a double breasted front panel, commonly referred to today as a “fireman's shirt.”
The model could have come from the uniforms of other localities, perhaps companies such as Richmond 's distinguished Light Infantry Blues, the members of which were wearing a somewhat similar uniform.

The Lynchburg newspaper of the period gives occasional clues as to how these uniforms were procured and manufactured. In the year and a half between Brown's raid and the acceptance of the Lynchburg companies into Virginia (and hence Confederate) service, the citizens became very adept at providing for their volunteers. Accord­ing to the following quotes from theLynchburg Daily Virginian, an effective cottage industry emerged to outfit the companies:

Monday, April 29, 1861 Such members of the Lynchburg Rfles as have not had their measures taken for uniforms are requested to attend the squad drill at Martin's Warehouse on Monday 29th inst., at 8p.m. ”

Wednesday, May 1, 1861 The Lynchburg Rifles are progressing well in their drills. They promise to make a fine company. Their uniforms are being made and will soon be completed They are of gray goods trimmed with blue and will look well. Capt. [James E.] Blankenship commands the Lynchburg Rifles.

Thursday, May 2, 1861 The ladies of Lynchburg have made themselves very useful in the present emergency and deserve great praise for their patriotic spirit. They have fitted out sever­al companies and parts of companies, and are now making up Uniforms for a compa­ny recently organized in Nelson County . They are worthy descendants of the ma­trons of the Revolution.

As the same newspaper frequently reported, the ladies of Lynchburg were kept busy not only in outfitting new companies, but also replacing worn uniforms after the city's soldiers transferred to Richmond and Manassas . Serving under Brigadier General James Longstreet, the men of the 11th Virginia probably were wearing these unique uniforms in the first battle at Manassas on July 21, 1861 .

Assigned to James L. Kemper's brigade in 1862, the 11th saw action that May at Williamsburg and again at Seven Pines. At some point, all of the 11th would have been issued solid gray jackets, surely by the summer of 1862 and the second battle at Manas­sas . During the Maryland Campaign the following month, the regiment was engaged at South Mountain and Sharpsburg . Among those killed on South Mountain on September 14th was Brigadier General Samuel Garland, Jr., founder of the Lynchburg Home Guard, who had since been promoted twice and was leading a brigade of North Carolinians .
At Gettysburg , the 11th Virginia assaulted Cemetery Ridge on July 3, 1863 with Pickett's division and suffered high casualties in the charge. In April 1864 the regiment took part in the attack on Fort Warren at Plymouth , North Carolina , then returned to Virginia , where they were engaged at Drewry's Bluff and Cold Harbor . They fought in the trenches at Petersburg in the winter of 1864 and incurred grievous losses at Five Forks and Sayler's Creek in the final campaign of Lee's army. When the 11th surrendered at Appomattox on April 9, 1865 , they were led by Sergeant John Adkinson of Company E, who commanded a mere 28 men.

Much remains to be learned about the uniforms depicted in this article. Most of the images are undated, yet were likely taken either in Lynchburg or Richmond in the narrow span of time between when hostilities were imminent and the units were mustered into Virginia service. Although these pictures illustrate a continuity of style among companies formed in the vicinity of Lynchburg , there is no doubt that, as was the case throughout the South, variation was the rule rather than the exception. The authors hope that the article will serve as a catalyst to help uncover new images and data and a greater understanding of Lynchburg 's rich Civil War history.

*Note: Click on the following link to view the photographs which accompany the above article.

http://www.historicsandusky.org/uniforms.htm

Whoever stood in front of the corn field at Antietam needs no praise." . . . . . Rufus R. Dawes, 6th Wisconsin.
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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Jun-2012 at 08:10

James Henry Woodson served in Co. H (The "Appomattox Rangers"), 2nd Virginia Cavalry. Woodson wears a uniform similar to that of the Lynchburg infantry companies.  His company was raised in Appomattox but was mustered into state service in Lynchburg and was perhaps outfitted there as well.  Sixth-plate hand colored melainotype.


Whoever stood in front of the corn field at Antietam needs no praise." . . . . . Rufus R. Dawes, 6th Wisconsin.
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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Jun-2012 at 08:04
Murry F. Taylor and Richard H. T. Adams on the staff of A.P. Hill.  Adams is wearing his uniform of the "Lynchburg Home Guard."  Colored Quarter-plate ambrotype by Rees.

The "Lynchburg Home Guard" became Company G, 11th Virginia Infantry.
Whoever stood in front of the corn field at Antietam needs no praise." . . . . . Rufus R. Dawes, 6th Wisconsin.
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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Jun-2012 at 08:02
Originally posted by Nick1986


Uniform of the 2nd Virginia cavalry: blue with grey and red facings


This photograph is incorrectly identified. 
Whoever stood in front of the corn field at Antietam needs no praise." . . . . . Rufus R. Dawes, 6th Wisconsin.
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  Quote Nick1986 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-Jun-2012 at 19:30

1st Louisiana, part of the Confederate Irish Brigade
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  Quote Nick1986 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15-Jun-2012 at 19:24

Georgia confederates: Montgomery Guards and Jasper Greens
http://www.minecreek.org/irish-american/georgia.html
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  Quote Nick1986 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14-Jun-2012 at 19:23

Here's an interesting description of SC confederate uniforms: a black jacket, pants and hat. Not the most practical wear in a tropical climate:
http://freepages.history.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~townsend/Recollections/Rec01.htm
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  Quote Nick1986 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12-Jun-2012 at 19:46
Uniforms of the Palmetto riflemen. The leather helmet with skull insignia sounds very similar to the German pickelhaube:
http://home.freeuk.com/palmetto/uniform.htm
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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Jun-2012 at 21:45
Originally posted by RaggedAssSecond


Artifact Description:KERSEY TROUSERS; SKY BLUE; NORTHERN MADE/STANDARD ISSUE TO UNION INFANTRY; 1 BUTTON FRONT CLOSURE; WAIST ADJUSTABLE BY TAB IN BACK; POOR CONDITION; PROPER RIGHT LEG - AREA OF LOSS.
Access#:1996.193.20
Artifact Class:CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES
Associations:MAY, ALFRED --TRIO GUARD --61ST REGIMENT,NC TROOPS --MAY FAMILY/ASSOCIATED WITH --CIVIL WAR/ASSOCIATED WITH
Dimensions:[Lt]3' 5 3/4" [Wdt]1' 1 3/8"
Materials:WOOL
Date Made:1862-1865
Place Made:USA
Place Used:USA
Use History:THESE TROUSERS WERE MANUFACTURED FOR MILITARY USE IN THE CONFEDERATE ARMY. THEY WERE ISSUED TO SGT. ALFRED MAY OF THE 61ST REGIMENT NORTH CAROLINA STATE TROOPS AND WORN BY HIM UNTIL THE END OF THE WAR. KEPT BY HIS FAMILY UNTIL DONATED TO THE MUSEUM.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION: 
LIGHT BLUE KERSEY TWILL WOOL. BUTTON FLY WITH FIVE BUTTON CLOSURE; ONE METAL BUTTON REPLACED WITH A 1/4" WOODEN BUTTON. SIX BUTTONS AROUND WAISTBAND. BELT BACK TO ADJUST FIT. ONE PIECE WAISTBAND. BACK SEAM REPAIRED AT CROTCH; BELT BACK TABS SHORTENED BY BEING FOLDED AND STITCHED DOWN; HOLES IN RIGHT BACK AND RIGHT FRONT PATCHED WITH DARK BROWN TWILL WEAVE FABRIC. WAIST BAND LINING IS UNBLEACHED TWILL WEAVE LINEN. POCKET IS BROWN TWILL WEAVE LINEN.

HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE: 
RARE EXAMPLE OF CONFEDERATE MILITARY TROUSERS.




*Note: The description by the North Carolina Museum of History is incorrect. These trouser are definitely not Northern made.
Whoever stood in front of the corn field at Antietam needs no praise." . . . . . Rufus R. Dawes, 6th Wisconsin.
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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Jun-2012 at 21:41

 Royal and Sky Blue Enlisted Men’s Trousers in the Army of Northern Virginia

Fact or Fiction?

By David Burt

In the film "Gettysburg" virtually every Confederate soldier seems to wear sky blue trousers. This film is hardly the most authentic as far as uniforms are concerned, but apart from a few incidents of Confederate Soldiers capturing Federal pants, just how likely would it be for soldiers in Lee's army to wear sky blue or royal blue trousers? Confederate Infantry Regulations published on June 6th 1861 called for sky blue trousers for enlisted men. Prior to 1862 the Richmond Clothing manufactory made a large percentage of the trousers in Sky Blue and Grey Kersey. However more and more of this quality Kersey was sold to officers and it became increasingly rare in enlisted men's clothing. 

From early 1862 most of the cloth used for making trousers was jeans and cassimere, but some woollen kersey was manufactured domestically. Made by such firms as the Danville Manufacturing co, and the Crenshaw Woollen mill, both of whom were located in Virginia. It was probable blue woollen trousers were still being produced through this period. But by October 1863 large amounts of Sky Blue,  Medium Blue, and Royal Blue, woollen Kersey began to arrive at the Richmond Depot from England.

Upon becoming the first foreign agent for the Quatermasters Dept in December 1862. Major James B Ferguson’s first order,the following April, was to purchase one million yards of woollen cloth, with half in sky blue for trousers.

Two receipt ledgers for the last quarter of 1863, and the whole of 1864 shows this cloth from England coming into the Richmond Depot. Cloth listed as "English Blue Cloth" "Pilot Cloth" "Blue Trowsering" "English Blue-Privates" In fact these Blue Cloths were the second largest quantity of cloths imported from England behind the blue/grey kersey. 

There are also references from the ledger to "sky blue" cloth in smaller but still substantial quantities, probably similar to Federal blue and probably used for trousers. 

Surviving examples of blue trousers made by the Richmond Depot include a pair worn by Private Henry Redwood who served in the 3rd Virginia local Defence Troops. They are sky blue woollen kersey cloth, with inner facings and pockets of light brown cotton Osnaburg with Japanned tin buttons. 

Another pair belonged to CpI T.V. Brooke of the Richmond Howitzers issued to him in 1864. Again sky blue wool kersey, inner facings and pockets of off white cotton, again with japanned tin buttons. Both these pairs of trousers are virtually identical. 

Yet another surviving pair belonged to Private Alfred May of the 61st NC INF The 61st NC only served briefly with the ANV from Oct-Dec 1864. This must have been when May received the trousers, as they have striking similarities to Richmond Depot issue. Royal blue in colour they are crudely made woollen pants; they have a back belt associated with the Richmond Depot Japanned tin buttons and off white inner facings and pockets, again virtually the same as the previous two pairs. 

 INCLUDEPICTURE "http://www.acws.co.uk/archives/images/nc_skyblue_trousers_f.jpg" \* MERGEFORMATINET  INCLUDEPICTURE "http://www.acws.co.uk/archives/images/nc_skyblue_trousers_r.jpg" \* MERGEFORMATINET
Trousers of Private Alfred May, 61st NC Inf.


Now, evidence has come to light on British Import ready made trousers reaching the Confederacy much earlier, in 1862.

A pair of Royal blue (Bright Blue) wool Kersey  trousers worn by General William Dorsey Pender were ready made and were imported to the Confederacy by the English firm S Isaac Campbell and Co. These trousers were for the use of enlisted men with pockets and inner facings of light brown cotton drill.Black japanned tin buttons ,narrow waistband with reinforcements behind trouser buttons,and with a label marked "Campbell and Co".The Pender trousers have no WD (War Department) or C&M ( Certificate & Medal) marks on them.Which is evidence they were produced solely for the Confederate market by contractors working for S Isaac Campbell & Co.

  Gen Pender was wearing these trousers intended for the use of Confederate enlistedmen when he was mortally wounded at Gettysburg in July 1863.

In a letter entitled  Astract of summary statement showing quantity and value of army supplies purchased and shipped by Maj C Huse on account Confederate States Government Dated Feb 3rd 1863, Col J Gorgas Chief of Ordnance stated:

“8,250 pairs of Trousers” had been accounted for, and “13,750 Pairs were in London awaiting shipment”.

Major Caleb Huse –or Captain, as he was in 1861-, had been sent to England in May 1861 to purchase much needed Quatermaster and Ordnance goods.

He quickly linked up to the firm of S Isaac Campbell & Co of Jermyn (Pronounced German) St London. S Isaac Campbell were able to offer Huse bulk purchases on all kinds of military stores,including cloth, and ready made trousers.Huse carried on buying QM goods until replaced by the QM Dept’s own agent Maj JB Ferguson in the spring of 1863. 

Since Major Caleb Huse exclusively used the Firm of S Isaac Campbell & Co for his purchases.. Plus General Pender’s trousers are marked “Campbell & Co”, added to the fact he was wearing them in the Summer of 1863.All this strongly suggest’s that these could be a pair of the trousers mentioned in Gorgas’s letter above.

Although the letter does not specify the colours of the trousers provided.Judging from the colour of  Gen Pender’s trousers ( Royal Blue) it must be very likely that most, if not all, would have been the regulation colour of Blue.

Descriptions of Longstreet’s Corps upon their arrival and during the battle of Chickamauga Sept 19th – 20th 1863. A member of Bragg’s artillery took note of the appearance of Longstreet’s men.

He noted “ our first impression was partly caused by the color of their uniform (dark blue gray jackets, light blue pants”).And a member of Kershaw’s Brigade of Longstreet’s Corps remembered his uniform as a “Dark Blue round jacket, closely fitting with light blue trousers”.

So given the evidence of Longstreet’s own men, it seems likely they were uniformed probably in English imported trousers sent through the blockade.

As previously stated 8,250 pairs had arrived, with some 13,750 awaiting shipment.So all told we could be looking at a total of some 22,000 pairs.


And yet there were more descriptions of soldiers in the A.N.V. wearing blue trousers.


An Illinois Infantryman who talked to some pickets of a South Carolina Regiment in 1863 described them as “better dressed than we are, their uniforms being apparently new". The Carolinians uniform is bluish grey with sky blue pants and according to D. Augustus Dickert Co H 3rd S.C. their uniforms consisted of a “dark blue jackets closely fitting, with light blue trousers”.


However, it was however becoming increasingly dangerous to wear these light blue pants with a blue grey jacket. On September 21st 1864 a letter written by A R Lawton Chief Quartermaster to J B Ferguson Chief Purchasing Agent in Britain,who had taken over purchasing Quartermaster goods from Maj Huse stated. "You need not contract for blue cloth for pants, as the grey makes up to more advantage". So unofficially the making of blue trousers was at an end but how many blue trousers were still made from remaining blue, or royal blue cloth is unknown. 

Summary and Conclusions 

Confederate regulations published in June 1861 specified sky blue trousers for enlisted men. This policy was not dropped until at least September 1864. Judging from extant pairs and written evidence it is obvious many Confederate trousers were made from sky blue kersey, or one of several shades of medium to "dark royal", blue kersey or "blue trowsering". These trousers, made with imported, or domestically produced cloth, were Richmond Depot issue made in the RD pattern.Which copied the popular civilian trousers of the day, including a belt and buckle for adjustment.  

These, added to the S Isaac Campbell & Co imported ready made trousers that started to arrive in 1862, probably meant they were around in substantial numbers. Fact or fiction? -Definitely a fact. 

Sources:- 

7th SC Vols - Ron Field

Catalog of Uniforms Museum of the Confederacy    Les Jenson

Echoes of Glory - Arms and Equipment of the Confederacy 

N.C. Museum of History 

OR Series IV Vol II p 383-85

OR Series IV Vol  III P 674

Regiments and Uniforms of the Civil War  Don Troiani

British Accoutrements  1750 –1900  Pierre Turner.

The New Richmond Depot Catalog  Chris White  Citing Record Group 109  Confederate Records Nat Archives

Confederate Industry  Harold S Wilson.

            David Burt  2007


Whoever stood in front of the corn field at Antietam needs no praise." . . . . . Rufus R. Dawes, 6th Wisconsin.
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  Quote Nick1986 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Jun-2012 at 21:27
That is a dark shade of grey (very close to the greatcoats and trousers issued to the British army). I'm not surprised late-war Confederates could be mistaken for Yankees as the US-issue sack coat was made of poor quality wool (shoddy) that quickly faded on campaign
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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Jun-2012 at 21:14

Alfred May, one of nine children of John and Elizabeth Tyson May, was born in Pitt County on March 24, 1843, in a home built by his father and the family slaves. The May land had been in family hands since before the American Revolution, and John had achieved success as a prosperous landholder. To work the land, he used both family and slave labor. The 1860 census indicated that John May owned twenty-eight slaves who ranged in age from four to fifty years. The census also listed Alfred, the youngest male in the family, as a student. No doubt John and Elizabeth May followed the secession crisis with close attention and concern, since they had sons of military age. John May died on May 25, 1861, just five days after North Carolina left the Union. Perhaps because of their father's death, the sons felt obligated to stay at home and care for their mother and sisters. However, in 1862 the war took the boys from the farm into Confederate service. First Robert enlisted on April 7, then Benjamin on May 6, and finally Alfred on August 25.

Alfred May left his Pitt County home in the summer of 1862 and traveled to Wilmington, where on August 25 he enlisted in Company F (Trio Guards), Sixty-first Regiment North Carolina Troops. He served in the same unit as his older brothers Robert and Benjamin May. The regiment fought in eastern North Carolina in 1862, and in 1863 it saw combat at Battery Wagner near Charleston. The following year, the Sixty-first North Carolina fought in several battles around Richmond. Benjamin suffered a wound to the head at Petersburg in July 1864, and Robert died in a Richmond hospital of unrecorded causes in October. The regiment participated in the last major battle of the war at Bentonville in March 1865. At some point in the war's final days or after the Confederate surrender, Alfred returned home and carefully put away his uniform, rifle, cartridge box, pistol, and many other items, including objects that he apparently carried home as battlefield souvenirs. The grouping of artifacts displayed here is unique. It is the largest extant collection of objects associated with a North Carolina Confederate enlisted soldier.

Alfred May returned home determined to prosper in postwar North Carolina, despite the loss of much of his family's wealth through the emancipation of their slaves. Gradually Alfred acquired land that had passed to other family members and consolidated the May holdings. On October 12, 1875, he married Ida Eugenia Wooten, and eventually they had eight children. When he died on March 29, 1906, Alfred was buried in the family cemetery, just a few hundred feet from his place of birth. The objects that Alfred May brought home from the Civil War passed down first to his children and then to his grandchildren as family treasures. They were displayed during family gatherings on special occasions, and the story of Alfred's war service was told. The May farm in Pitt County still remains in family hands today. In the early 1990s, Alfred May's grandchildren donated his Civil War artifacts to the North Carolina Museum of History.

Whoever stood in front of the corn field at Antietam needs no praise." . . . . . Rufus R. Dawes, 6th Wisconsin.
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  Quote RaggedAssSecond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Jun-2012 at 21:10


Artifact Description:KERSEY TROUSERS; SKY BLUE; NORTHERN MADE/STANDARD ISSUE TO UNION INFANTRY; 1 BUTTON FRONT CLOSURE; WAIST ADJUSTABLE BY TAB IN BACK; POOR CONDITION; PROPER RIGHT LEG - AREA OF LOSS.
Access#:1996.193.20
Artifact Class:CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES
Associations:MAY, ALFRED --TRIO GUARD --61ST REGIMENT,NC TROOPS --MAY FAMILY/ASSOCIATED WITH --CIVIL WAR/ASSOCIATED WITH
Dimensions:[Lt]3' 5 3/4" [Wdt]1' 1 3/8"
Materials:WOOL
Date Made:1862-1865
Place Made:USA
Place Used:USA
Use History:THESE TROUSERS WERE MANUFACTURED FOR MILITARY USE IN THE CONFEDERATE ARMY. THEY WERE ISSUED TO SGT. ALFRED MAY OF THE 61ST REGIMENT NORTH CAROLINA STATE TROOPS AND WORN BY HIM UNTIL THE END OF THE WAR. KEPT BY HIS FAMILY UNTIL DONATED TO THE MUSEUM.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION: 
LIGHT BLUE KERSEY TWILL WOOL. BUTTON FLY WITH FIVE BUTTON CLOSURE; ONE METAL BUTTON REPLACED WITH A 1/4" WOODEN BUTTON. SIX BUTTONS AROUND WAISTBAND. BELT BACK TO ADJUST FIT. ONE PIECE WAISTBAND. BACK SEAM REPAIRED AT CROTCH; BELT BACK TABS SHORTENED BY BEING FOLDED AND STITCHED DOWN; HOLES IN RIGHT BACK AND RIGHT FRONT PATCHED WITH DARK BROWN TWILL WEAVE FABRIC. WAIST BAND LINING IS UNBLEACHED TWILL WEAVE LINEN. POCKET IS BROWN TWILL WEAVE LINEN.

HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE: 
RARE EXAMPLE OF CONFEDERATE MILITARY TROUSERS.

Whoever stood in front of the corn field at Antietam needs no praise." . . . . . Rufus R. Dawes, 6th Wisconsin.
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