Notice: This is the official website of the All Empires History Community (Reg. 10 Feb 2002)

  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Register Register  Login Login

Topic ClosedAre Kurds Descended From the Medes?

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  123 4>
Author
Shield-of-Dardania View Drop Down
Consul
Consul
Avatar
Suspended

Joined: 23-Mar-2010
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 357
Direct Link To This Post Topic: Are Kurds Descended From the Medes?
    Posted: 12-Apr-2010 at 02:35
What about the Medes themselves, who were their ancestors? Could the Cymmerians have been a likely candidate?
 
I pose that question because the Cymmerians suddenly 'dissappeared' from the scene about the same time that the Medes 'appeared'. Like, as if, the former, or at least some elements of them, decided to 'reinvent' themselves, then started wearing another 'label'.


Edited by Shield-of-Dardania - 12-Apr-2010 at 02:46
History makes everything. Everything is history in the making.
Back to Top
Ince View Drop Down
Colonel
Colonel


Joined: 24-Dec-2009
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 550
Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Apr-2010 at 19:39
Originally posted by kalhur

for the sure the median has been one of the people groups that lived in kurdestan and most important one because they left behind both a dominant  language and their religion , but they can't be the only one who builds the origin of  kurds, because before the median arrived there has been a lot of older civilisations living there and surely they have been absorbed and assimilated with medians.
 the simmilarity between  kurdish words and persian's is obvious, but they are not the same language . like danish and swedish which have a lot in common, but still are different languages,


I once read somewhere(can't remember where) on a linguastic study on the Kurdish Languages Sorani and Kurmanji, where  the author believed that Kurds most likely originated further south/west Iran.   I am not sure how credible his assumption is.  Where others believe Kurdish was influced by Persian and hence leans towards South Western Iranian language group.

Kurdish langauge has a lot of South Western Iranian elements in it and is nearly in between SW and NW.   Gorani and Zazaki by linguastics is a different langauge to Kurmanji and Sorani.   Kurmanji and Sorani share many similarties with Persian  that Gorani and Zazaki don't  For example the use of "W" for "X".   I am still trying to figure out Kurdish history and the relationships between the language groups that may hold a key to the Kurdish history.

ZazakiPersianKurdish (Kurmanci)
English
vb / gb / g
-
vābādbā
wind
vārānbārānbārān
rain
vācāvāzbēj
sing, say
vāz-bez-bez-
run
vangbangbang, dang
voice
veyvbayobuk
bride, wedding
varekbarrebarx
sheep
vawr, vorbarfbefr
snow
vēn, vīnbīn-bīn-
see
vīstbistbist
twenty
vīyābīvebī
widow
viyālbidbi
willow
vāšgiyāhgiyā
grass
vilgulgul
rose
varggorggurg
wolf

ZazakiPersianKurdish (Kurmanci)
English
wx(u)x(w)
-
witišxwābxew
sleep
wxxw
sweet
wend-xānd-xwend-
read
waxāharxweh
sister
werd-xord-xward-
swallow, eat
 

Heres a great article on the Kurdish Languages.

http://www.iranica.com/articles/kurdish-language-i

Altogether, the isoglosses show clearly that it makes sense to use the terms “NW” and “SW” not in a black-and-white sense, but in that of a “scale of SW- or NW-ness,” of which two or three historical phases may be distinguished. (The scale model, in the form in which I proposed in 1998, was rightly criticized by Korn [2003] for not adequately taking into account the historical sequence of the sound changes.) Kurdish and Balōči, then, are “less NW” than many other WIr. languages and dialects with respect to the oldest (pre-OIr.) stratum of isoglosses, but for the pre-MIr. isoglosses, Kurdish is “much less NW” than Balōči and most other WIr. idioms. For the most recent stratum of isoglosses, an inconsistent picture emerges, showing (for the first time) exclusively-Kd. sound changes like šm > -v/-w, besides others that Kurdish shares with NP. against all NW (*w- > b-), or with most NW against NP. and Balōči (*xt > t). Combining all this, one may call Kurdish “originally more NW and quite close to Balōči, but since pre-MIr. times inclining more towards the SW.”




Edited by Ince - 11-Apr-2010 at 19:49
Back to Top
kalhur View Drop Down
Earl
Earl


Joined: 23-Jan-2010
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 263
Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Apr-2010 at 18:07
for the sure the median has been one of the people groups that lived in kurdestan and most important one because they left behind both a dominant  language and their religion , but they can't be the only one who builds the origin of  kurds, because before the median arrived there has been a lot of older civilisations living there and surely they have been absorbed and assimilated with medians.
 the simmilarity between  kurdish words and persian's is obvious, but they are not the same language . like danish and swedish which have a lot in common, but still are different languages,
Back to Top
Ince View Drop Down
Colonel
Colonel


Joined: 24-Dec-2009
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 550
Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07-Apr-2010 at 06:35
Originally posted by Shield-of-Dardania

Cymmerian, perhaps?
 
If one considers that the Medeans, the supposedly widely-supposed ancestor of the Kurds, were only really in power from the sack of Nainawa (Nineveh) by Madya (Madius) in 612 BC to the defeat of Hastayaga (Astyages) by his half-Persian grandson Khouroush (Cyrus) in 549 BC, i.e. a period of merely 63 years, it sometimes makes one wonder if the Medeans were really a distinct, separate ancient Iranian tribe, or simply an elite, aristocratic offshoot subtribe of Scythians or Cymmerians.
 
For, other than: (1) the Greek myth of Princess Medea, daughter of King Aeetes of Colchia, in the Greek legend, Jason and the Argonauts; and (2) the biblical legend, believed by Josephus, atrributing the Medeans as descendants of Madayu (Madai), son of Yafeth (Japhet); there is no solid historical Indo-European derived etymology for the name Mada/Madayu (Medes).

I believe linguastically Kurds are descendeds of the Medes.  The strong similarties Kurds share with Persians and other iranians like Balouchi with Culture and langauge points to a Iranian Origin.  Genetically it could be a bit different as the region has been under different rulers and genetics can change a bit with mixing.

What about Herodotus claims?

and this

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article817707.ece

October 26, 2002

Briton unearths Herodotus' lost city of the Medes

An archaeologist's model brings history to life

< ="text/" ="http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/js/m24--browser.js">
By Simon de Bruxelles
gSiteLife.Recommend("ExternalResource", "817707","http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article817707.ece");
< ="text/"> div#related-article-links p a, div#related-article-links p a:visited { color:#06c; }
A LOST city described by the Greek historian Herodotus has been identified by a British archaeologist in central Turkey.

Geoffrey Summers has identified the vast mountain site as Pteria, the western capital of the Medes. The discovery may finally end the debate among scholars about the veracity of Herodotus’ account.

Dr Summers’s work has provided the first concrete evidence of the long-forgotten Medean empire. Using the latest archaeological surveying techniques and computer graphics Dr Summers and his team have begun to reconstruct a “virtual reality” model of the ancient city which, according to Herodotus, was looted and burnt to the ground by the army of the Lydian King Croesus.

In 1975, Dr Summers, 52, became fascinated by the fortified iron age city on the side of a granite mountain called Kerkenes Dag. The 2.5 sq km site is still surrounded by a 7km defensive wall with seven gates that can be seen from space.

Beneath a 2,600-year-old shroud of soil everything is exactly as it was left when the inhabitants of Pteria were reputedly marched off into slavery. Because of the size of the site, conventional archaeological techniques could provide only limited information about the development of the city which, in its heyday in the fifth century BC, was home to 10,000 to 20,000 people.

Dr Summers and his wife Françoise have spent the past ten years surveying the site using everything from aerial photography from a hot air balloon to ground-penetrating radar and GPS to map the ancient structures to an accuracy of 10cm. It is the first time such a large archaeological site in Turkey has been mapped in such detail.

It was evidence of a great fire that convinced Mr Summers that he had found Pteria, the western capital of the Medes, who emerged from Ancient Persia in the sixth century BC to occupy what is now Eastern Anatolia.

Although there are a few references to the Medes in later Greek and Assyrian records, there is little contemporary evidence of their existence, although the Kurds are widely thought to be their modern descendants. According to Herodotus, the war between the Medes and the Lydians culminated in the Battle of the Eclipse. As the battle raged, an eclipse blacked out the sun and the combatants laid down their arms and withdrew. The eclipse has allowed the battle to be dated to May 28, 585BC, when the city surveyed by Mr Summers would have been at its height.

Within a generation Pteria had been sacked by Croesus and the site abandoned and forgotten. Dr Summers has uncovered evidence that it was looted and its fortifications toppled to prevent it being re-occupied. The archaeological account ties in precisely with that of Herodotus.

Dr Summers said: “At the time we began studying the site there was a view that Herodotus’ account was at best inaccurate or at worst made up. There were even doubts about the Medean empire itself.

“Archaeologically, we know nothing about the Medes. This project puts them on the map and it supports Herodotus’ accounts.”

Dr Summers, who was born in London but has taught at the Middle East Technical University in Ankara for 18 years, said: “The size and complexity of the city are astonishing. It was built when the Greek city states were colonising the Mediterranean and the Black Sea, so it fills a gap in the history of city planning.”

This week Dr Summers became the only British recipient of the bi-annual Rolex Awards for Enterprise. He will be presented with a cheque for $35,000 (£22,500) at a ceremony at the Royal Insitution in London on November 6. Dr Summers will use the money to rebuild the city’s main gates, which stand 5m high, and to excavate more of the palace complex. Norman Hammond, The Times archaeological correspondent, said Dr Summers’ identification of the city was important because it would shed light on the Medeans and allow artefacts to be dated to within ten years.

Words of the 'legend'

“Croesus, when he had crossed (the Halys River) with his army, came into Cappadocian territory, to what is called Pteria. Pteria is the strongest part of all that country and lies in a line with the city of Sinope, on the Euxine Sea. There he encamped, destroying the farms of the Syrians and he captured the city of the Pterians and made slaves of the people, and he captured all the neighbouring towns; moreover, he drove the Syrians from their homes, though they had done him no manner of harm.

Cyrus, on his side, gathered his own army, and took on, as well, all the peoples who lived between him and Croesus (before he set out to march at all, he sent heralds to the Ionians and tried to make them desert Croesus. But the Ionians would not listen to him). So when Cyrus came and encamped over against Croesus, then and there in that land of Pteria they fought against one another with might and main.

The battle was fierce, and many fell on both sides. At last they broke off at the onset of night, without either having the victory, so hard did the two armies fight.”





Edited by Ince - 07-Apr-2010 at 06:49
Back to Top
opuslola View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar
Avatar
suspended

Joined: 23-Sep-2009
Location: Long Beach, MS,
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 4620
Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06-Apr-2010 at 20:29
Unless I am totally incorrect and mis-informed, it seems that American troops in Iraq, have repeatedly stood for the Kurds!

At least we used to? Has the Obama administration changed it?

http://www.quotationspage.com/subjects/history/
Back to Top
Shield-of-Dardania View Drop Down
Consul
Consul
Avatar
Suspended

Joined: 23-Mar-2010
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 357
Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06-Apr-2010 at 17:56
Cymmerian, perhaps?
 
If one considers that the Medeans, the supposedly widely-supposed ancestor of the Kurds, were only really in power from the sack of Nainawa (Nineveh) by Madya (Madius) in 612 BC to the defeat of Hastayaga (Astyages) by his half-Persian grandson Khouroush (Cyrus) in 549 BC, i.e. a period of merely 63 years, it sometimes makes one wonder if the Medeans were really a distinct, separate ancient Iranian tribe, or simply an elite, aristocratic offshoot subtribe of Scythians or Cymmerians.
 
For, other than: (1) the Greek myth of Princess Medea, daughter of King Aeetes of Colchia, in the Greek legend, Jason and the Argonauts; and (2) the biblical legend, believed by Josephus, atrributing the Medeans as descendants of Madayu (Madai), son of Yafeth (Japhet); there is no solid historical Indo-European derived etymology for the name Mada/Madayu (Medes).


Edited by Shield-of-Dardania - 06-Apr-2010 at 18:03
History makes everything. Everything is history in the making.
Back to Top
kalhur View Drop Down
Earl
Earl


Joined: 23-Jan-2010
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 263
Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Jan-2010 at 14:10
Hi
about the origin of kurds. well i am from kurdish population of kermanshah with some old paternal  roots from shiraz. i made a haplogroup test and i was surprised of the result (haplogroup T). i wonder how many ancient people has mixed to result actuall iranians or kurds.? which origin haplogroup T presents?i know many people in iran have beside R1a other haplogroupslike j and C , but it seems a few % does have T among  kurd and lors this group is find in highest % in kermanshah and isfahan and shiraz. i guess it belongs to an ancient civilization which mixed with aryans, but don't know which one?
best regards


Edited by kalhur - 25-Jan-2010 at 03:21
Back to Top
opuslola View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar
Avatar
suspended

Joined: 23-Sep-2009
Location: Long Beach, MS,
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 4620
Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Jan-2010 at 17:30
And, TGS, you wrote; "Yea, I know, I'm talking about the four main American English accents such as Midewestern, Southern, Eastern, and Western accents, of which other American accents fall under (I'm sure there are many different accents in Tennesse or Alabama but they all fall under the same general category of Southern accents)."

Thus, I would guess that you whould consider a common accent found in New Orleans, La., whould be "southern?" But, you would be far from the truth! The accent that is found most commonly amongst the White population in the areas of New Orleans and vicinity, that were flooded whtn the levies failed, can only be compared to the same accent that still exists in parts of New York, NY!

I.e., dis, dem, da and dos! I.e. a typical Irish accent from Brooklyn, NY, NY!

I know, that you do not know! Some, so called Southern accents are derived from the English spoken in parts of GB, during the migration to the USA (American Colonies) and others are merely a figment of Yankee imagination, as well as those "carpetbaggers" who came South to steal a lot of the wealth of the loosing Southern familes, and then try to adopt a Southern accent, after only becoming Southern after 1866 or so!
http://www.quotationspage.com/subjects/history/
Back to Top
Ince View Drop Down
Colonel
Colonel


Joined: 24-Dec-2009
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 550
Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Jan-2010 at 16:18
Originally posted by Messopotamian

Are u idiot ? or not ?
 
You say " Kurdish a persian dialect "
 
other turks too


Where did I say it was a Persian Dialect?? All I am trying to say is Kurdish is not that different from Persian and is a similar language.
Back to Top
opuslola View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar
Avatar
suspended

Joined: 23-Sep-2009
Location: Long Beach, MS,
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 4620
Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-Jan-2010 at 19:46
TGS, you wrote;
"I dont know about the other countries you mentioned, but most people in Iran have access to both radio and television."

Yes Great Simba, I understand that today what you state is so! But, as it seems you missed, I was refering to events of 50 or more years ago!

Certainly you cannot tell me that most Iranians in 1955 CE or so, had either access to radio (unless by crystal units)or TV, or News Papers!

That was my point! It seems, relatively, Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, etc., are in essence quite new to these "media" methods! The only people in these nations in 1955 that had access to any of the above media sources,in mass, would have had to have lived within a few miles of a capital city!

Certainly electricity, outside of capital cities, is a new comer to most all of rural areas of any of these nations! That is mostly acquired after the 1960's, and later!
Regards,
http://www.quotationspage.com/subjects/history/
Back to Top
TheGreatSimba View Drop Down
Chieftain
Chieftain


Joined: 22-Nov-2009
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 1152
Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16-Jan-2010 at 15:52
Originally posted by opuslola


TGS, it seems either you were being very general of you know little of N. American language and especially accents! If you were trying to be "general" in your words, then OK! If not, you really need to speak to people in the USA that can recognize accents as I am want to do!

As anyone of English background, and who has actually travelled withing the USA, and who actually has what I call an "observant ear", can tell you is that the USA is made up of literally hundreds of accents! And, in times past, possibly thousands!


Yea, I know, I'm talking about the four main American English accents such as Midewestern, Southern, Eastern, and Western accents, of which other American accents fall under (I'm sure there are many different accents in Tennesse or Alabama but they all fall under the same general category of Southern accents).

I'm not including the thousands of different accents, such as the Iranian English accent, or Chinese English accent, or Mexican English accent, etc...

Originally posted by opuslola


As a young boy, one (or at least I) could tell that people from 50 KM or 30 miles from my locality, spoke with differing accents! The further away from my area, the greater the accent differed from my own!

And this in in a land where radio and TV and newspapers were very common!
It is hard for me to comprehend what it could be like in areas that we, here in the USA, would consider that until the last 40 or 50 years, or so, basically lived in "third world conditions!"? That is, no radio, no electricty, no TV, and no newspapers!

Hey I am describing the conditions that existed outside of most of the capital cities of your nations, or regions, until very recently! At least on the timescale of the majority of the USA, and even W. Europe!

It seems to me, as an outsider, that most people in Iran, Iraq, Afganistan, Nepal, Azerbajan, etc., actually lived in conditions more similar to those last lived by most people in the USA in the 18th century?

But, perhaps I could be wrong?
Regards,


I dont know about the other countries you mentioned, but most people in Iran have access to both radio and television.
Back to Top
opuslola View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar
Avatar
suspended

Joined: 23-Sep-2009
Location: Long Beach, MS,
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 4620
Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15-Jan-2010 at 16:00
Most every post here is bathed in "hatred!" It seems almost every ethnic group in most of the world is brought up to "hate" most every one who is not a part of their "little tribe" or their "little linguistic group", or their "little religious belief!"

You should all be chastised and spanked by your grand mothers! Of course they are probably the very ones who helped you learn your instincts to hate others?


But, TGS wrote;

"However, there are different Persian accents the same way there are different English accents. In the United States alone there are 4 different English accents, Australian/American/Canadian/British/South African, etc... English all are spoken in different accents.

it has to do with geography."

TGS, it seems either you were being very general of you know little of N. American language and especially accents! If you were trying to be "general" in your words, then OK! If not, you really need to speak to people in the USA that can recognize accents as I am want to do!

As anyone of English background, and who has actually travelled withing the USA, and who actually has what I call an "observant ear", can tell you is that the USA is made up of literally hundreds of accents! And, in times past, possibly thousands!

As a young boy, one (or at least I) could tell that people from 50 KM or 30 miles from my locality, spoke with differing accents! The further away from my area, the greater the accent differed from my own!

And this in in a land where radio and TV and newspapers were very common!
It is hard for me to comprehend what it could be like in areas that we, here in the USA, would consider that until the last 40 or 50 years, or so, basically lived in "third world conditions!"? That is, no radio, no electricty, no TV, and no newspapers!

Hey I am describing the conditions that existed outside of most of the capital cities of your nations, or regions, until very recently! At least on the timescale of the majority of the USA, and even W. Europe!

It seems to me, as an outsider, that most people in Iran, Iraq, Afganistan, Nepal, Azerbajan, etc., actually lived in conditions more similar to those last lived by most people in the USA in the 18th century?

But, perhaps I could be wrong?
Regards,
http://www.quotationspage.com/subjects/history/
Back to Top
Messopotamian View Drop Down
Knight
Knight
Avatar

Joined: 22-Sep-2009
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 56
Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15-Jan-2010 at 07:11
Are u idiot ? or not ?
 
You say " Kurdish a persian dialect "
 
other turks too
Back to Top
Ince View Drop Down
Colonel
Colonel


Joined: 24-Dec-2009
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 550
Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02-Jan-2010 at 18:56
If you guys do not want to believe me then that is up to you, anyway here are more similarties that I found.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zazaki_language

PersianKurdish (Kurmanci)
English
b / gb / g
-
bādbā
wind
bārānbārān
rain
āvāzbēj
sing, say
bez-bez-
run
bangbang, dang
voice
bayobuk
bride, wedding
barrebarx
sheep
barfbefr
snow
bīn-bīn-
see
bistbist
twenty
bīvebī
widow
bidbi
willow
giyāhgiyā
grass
gulgul
rose
gorggurg
wolf

Kurdish (Kurmanci)Persian
English
z/sd/h
-
dil (loan)dil
heart
zêrzar
gold
zan-dān-
know
zavadāmād
groom
ez (min)ed- (man)
I
bilindboland
borough, high
deh (loan)dah
ten

PersianKurdish (Kurmanci)
English
dd
-
darderi
door
PersianKurdish (Kurmanci)
English
ss
-
sese (loan)[6]
three
sisi (loan)[6]
thirty
PersianKurdish (Kurmanci)
English
ll
-
bolandbilind
borough, high
hil-hel
sprinkle, throw
lizalez
dash off, stand up, fly
seporzsıpıl
spleen
lsal
year
dildil
heart
gulgul
rose
PersianKurdish (Kurmanci)
English
x(u)x(w)
-
xwābxew
sleep
xxw
sweet
xānd-xwend-
read
xāharxweh
sister
xord-xward-
swallow, eat
PersianKurdish (Kurmanci)
English
mv
-
mnav
name
(hāmīn)vīn
summer
hambazheval
same
PersianKurdish (Kurmanci)
English
ftt/wt/ft
-
haftḥewt/heft
seven
kaftket/kewt/keft
get in
Back to Top
Messopotamian View Drop Down
Knight
Knight
Avatar

Joined: 22-Sep-2009
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 56
Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-Dec-2009 at 07:30
Of course words similar. But Kurmanjis not understand Persian.He says " I am Turkey Kurd ( Kurmanci ) and i understand Persian." I reject.  Maybe Iranian Kurds understand. But we not understand!
Back to Top
Azadi View Drop Down
Consul
Consul
Avatar
retired AE moderator

Joined: 17-Aug-2009
Location: Kurdistan, Iran
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 362
Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-Dec-2009 at 07:22
50 % are the same ?
Brother, Kurd or not, please do not give these fellow forumers false information. The reason I visit this website is because it's based on facts and scientific research.

Like I stated above it's a matter of where you grow up, geography - thanks TheGreatSimba.
What makes it even more difficult to understand Farsi (for our brothers in North, West and South) is our situation within our respective regions; Kurds now have VARIOUS words which mean the same, these words do not even look the same at all. Just take the English word "Live"; Zindi, Taze, Canli, Nwe +. 

So, the next time please come with facts, proof, and not something you heard from your parents - which, I would like to add, didn't "make out what he was saying most of the time". People quickly believe something they read on forums, keko ;)


Edited by Azadi - 27-Dec-2009 at 07:28
Back to Top
Ince View Drop Down
Colonel
Colonel


Joined: 24-Dec-2009
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 550
Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-Dec-2009 at 05:21
Originally posted by TheGreatSimba

Well, in general i think Azadi is correct. Although there are similarities, I do not think that a Persian speaker can understand a Kurdish speaker and vise versa.

However, there are different Persian accents the same way there are different English accents. In the United States alone there are 4 different English accents, Australian/American/Canadian/British/South African, etc... English all are spoken in different accents.

it has to do with geography.


Only about 50% of the words are similar and of that 50% is prounouced differently so it would be difficult to understand eachother.  For example when Ahmadinejad had a interview on TV and was speaking in Farsi, my parents told me they could understand a lot of words and some sentences but it was difficult to make out what he was saying most of the time. 

Edited by Ince - 27-Dec-2009 at 05:22
Back to Top
TheGreatSimba View Drop Down
Chieftain
Chieftain


Joined: 22-Nov-2009
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 1152
Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Dec-2009 at 21:06
Well, in general i think Azadi is correct. Although there are similarities, I do not think that a Persian speaker can understand a Kurdish speaker and vise versa.

However, there are different Persian accents the same way there are different English accents. In the United States alone there are 4 different English accents, Australian/American/Canadian/British/South African, etc... English all are spoken in different accents.

it has to do with geography.
Back to Top
Ince View Drop Down
Colonel
Colonel


Joined: 24-Dec-2009
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 550
Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Dec-2009 at 16:13
Originally posted by Messopotamian

Originally posted by Ince

Not similar? So why do I understand some of what a Persian says, even tho my Kurdish is not that great?, only big difference is the accent in which they pronounce some words differently.  

Words that are similar, their are many more then I listed. 

Her Kez?
Chande?
Chia?
Shireen?
Kune?
Zan/Dan?
Min/Man?
Ruz/Roz?
Zir/Zer?
Dar?
Dil?
Gul?

 
 
Sayeh shoma sangine shoudeh
 
it is persian. Do you understand it ? xD


No I do not understand that, I also do not understand when Kurds speak in Sorani as well.  My point is Farsi is similar to Kurdish, the main differenec is they prounounce some words differently and have a different accent.  Some Iranians when they speak Farsi I understand something at times, but only if the accent is similar to Kurdish.  Other Persians I barely understand as the accent is different. 

My next question is why do Some people in Iran speak Farsi in different accents? who are the ones that speak it in a way that Kurds can maybe pick up a few things their and then and the ones who speak in a way that I can barely understand a word?


Edited by Ince - 26-Dec-2009 at 16:14
Back to Top
Azadi View Drop Down
Consul
Consul
Avatar
retired AE moderator

Joined: 17-Aug-2009
Location: Kurdistan, Iran
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 362
Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26-Dec-2009 at 10:15

Bra, this is a matter of where you grew up. Of course if you grow up in East-Kurdistan, you will understand and probably speak Farsi fluently yourself. But if you speak Farsi to Kurds from the other regions (not on the border), they will not understand anything at all. Yes, they will pick up "bra", "nan" etc. but understand ? Come on... let alone they being 50% alike.

That's like saying people from Germany should be able to understand English, because 50% of the words probably are the same.

Edited by Azadi - 26-Dec-2009 at 10:18
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  123 4>

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Bulletin Board Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 9.56a [Free Express Edition]
Copyright ©2001-2009 Web Wiz

This page was generated in 0.063 seconds.