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Women In Warfare And The Military

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Cyrus Shahmiri View Drop Down
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  Quote Cyrus Shahmiri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Women In Warfare And The Military
    Posted: 03-Jan-2012 at 17:21
One of the major cities in the north of Iran is Rasht, you can find a large number of jokes about Rashti men and their wives in the web, you can read some of them here: http://www.rootgarden.com/rashti-jokes.htm
 
For example the number 10 can't really be considered as a joke:
 
Once upon a time a Shirazi, a Ghazvini and a Rashti were chatting about women. Shirazi guy says: Woman is like a flower. You look at it, you smell it and you water it. Ghazvini guy says: Woman is like a record player. You play one side, then you turn it and play the other. Rashti guy says: Woman is like a newspaper. You read it, and then you pass it to your neighbour to read it.
 
 
The jokes made about people from various cities are not meant as an insult. The people of every city make fun of people in other cities. It's the same all over the world.
In fact , the reason they have made jokes about Rashti women is that they have always been one step ahead of other women. Even back in the old days, when a strange man knocked on the door of someone's house, the Rashti women responded. Clerics considered this immoral [and thus Rashti women were seen as permiscuous.]
 
It is interesting to read about the history of this region, the historical name of the southern part of Caspian sea was Tapuria (Tabaristan): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tabaristan
 
Tapuria (widely known as Tabaristan) was the name of the former historic region in the Southern coasts of Caspian sea roughly in the location of northern and southern slopes of Elburz range in Iran.
 
Pietro Della Valle, who visited a town near Pirouzcow in Mazandaran, noted that Mazandarani women never wore the veil and didn't hesitate to talk to foreigners.
 
Some ancient historians have talked about the cultural life of these people, for example the famous Greek historian Strabo (64 BC - 24 AD) says:
 
 
The Tapyri are said to live between the Derbices and the Hyrcanians. It is reported of the Tapyri that it was a custom of theirs to give their wives in marriage to other husbands as soon as they had had two or three children by them. (Strabo, Geography, Book 11.9.3)


Edited by Cyrus Shahmiri - 03-Jan-2012 at 17:22
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05-Jan-2012 at 19:39

Arachidamia


Arachidamia (Greek: Αραχιδάμεια) was a wealthy Spartan queen, wife of Eudamidas I, mother of Archidamus IV and Agesistrata, grandmother of Eudamidas II, great-grandmother and grandmother of Agis IV.

We first hear of her leading Spartan women against Pyrrhus during his siege of Lacedaemon in the 3rd century BC. In the face of Pyrrhus's invasion, the SpartanGerousia considered sending the Spartan women to Crete for their safety. Arachidamia, speaking on behalf of the Spartan women, entered the Gerousia, "with sword in hand," and contested this proposal, questioning whether the Spartan women were expected to survive the ruin of their own city.

With the matter settled, the Spartans initiated the construction of a defensive trench running parallel to Pyrrhus's camp. We may presume that Arachidamia helped direct the Spartan women in this respect, since it is reported that the Spartan women impressively "completed with their own hands a third of the trench." We may also presume Arachidamia led the efforts Spartan women during the subsequent battle against Pyrrhus, as they are noted for supplying the defenders with weapons and refreshment during combat, and extracting wounded from the battlefield.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arachidamia

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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07-Jan-2012 at 21:08
 Nubian queen Amanishabheto reigned over Kush or Nubia. A depiction of her on a pylon tower of a chapel shows her striking the shoulders of prisoners with her lance.

Amanishabheto


Amanishabheto [also Amanishakheto] was Kandake (queen) of Kush from 10BC to 1AD. She succeeded the Candace Amanirenas. Amanishakheto was Crown Princess for several years before she became Kandake. When the Roman Emperor Augustus attempted to conquer Nubia, she fought the Roman Army in three battles from 24-21 BCE. When the Augustus attempted to tax the Kushites, she and her son Akinidad attacked a Roman fort in Egypt. The Romans eventually negotiated peace. She was succeeded by her daughter, Amanitore.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amanishabheto

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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Jan-2012 at 17:42
Not that I have much information on them(hopefully someone else will step in and flesh this out somewhat) but today I heard of the Bulgar warrior women of the ninth century AD.

 
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13-Jan-2012 at 09:56
Sassanid warrior woman,  Paygospanan Banu

......a Persian female warrior/governess known as the Paygospanan Banu
She has fired arrows into two Turanian warriors and is about to draw her fatal arrow against them. In the middle is a late Sassanian commander knight (Framandar) and to the left is the Marzban of Abarshahr who has drawn his sword. In Sassanian Persia, women acted as warriors, commanders and leaders.....
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  Quote TheAlaniDragonRising Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Jan-2012 at 14:15
2nd century BC - Queen Rhodogune of Parthia was informed of a rebellion while preparing for her bath. She vowed not to brush her hair until the rebellion was ended. She waged a long war to suppress the rebellion, and won it without breaking her vow

In 138 BCE Rhodogune married Seleucid king Demetrius II Nicator (ruled 146-139 BCE, 129-126 BCE). After bearing several children with him, she was presumably abandoned in 131 BCE when Demetrius, after numerous failed attempts to escape from Parthia, was dispatched back to Antioch during the invasion of Parthia by Demetrius' brother, Antiochus VII Sidetes.

During their marriage, she had been temporarily a hostage in the Parthian court after an ill-fated campaign.

Polyaenus (8.27) tells us that Rhodogune, informed of a revolt while preparing for a bath, vowed not to bathe or brush her hair until the revolt was neutralised. She immediately went to battle, riding out to the head of her army. She successfully directed the battle, and was depicted thereafter with long, disheveled hair because of her adherence to her vow. He is the sole source of the story.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhodogune_of_Parthia

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