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Mehmed the Conqueror

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  Quote eaglecap Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Mehmed the Conqueror
    Posted: 10-Jun-2010 at 11:49
Help

I am interested in researching Mehmed since in many ways I admire who and at the same time hate him, sort of an oxymoron. Can anyone suggest any primary sources and secondary? I know like many conquerors he was narcissistic and had a huge ego but in many ways he was like Alexander the great.   He murdered his infant brother but most conquerors are a bit on the nutty side in my opinion. I still want to focus on the positive side of this great man   I know many of the negatives aspects but and I will include them but will try and focus more on the positive side of this man. I still have to figure out a thesis but I simply want to learn more about him. I say this is jest but maybe I am him in another life! NOT!
Λοιπόν, αδελφοί και οι συμπολίτες και οι στρατιώτες, να θυμάστε αυτό ώστε μνημόσυνο σας, φήμη και ελευθερία σας θα ε
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  Quote opuslola Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Jun-2010 at 12:11
This book, entitled "The Ottoman Centuries, The rise and fall of the Turkish Empire", by Lord Kinross (1977), while not specifically discussing "the conqueror", has to devote a great deal of space to him because of his position and deeds!

Indeed a large portion of the book seems to be devoted to both Mehmed and Suliman!

Lots of good stuff, some most likely only found in this book!
http://www.quotationspage.com/subjects/history/
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  Quote eaglecap Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Jun-2010 at 12:40
Originally posted by opuslola

This book, entitled "The Ottoman Centuries, The rise and fall of the Turkish Empire", by Lord Kinross (1977), while not specifically discussing "the conqueror", has to devote a great deal of space to him because of his position and deeds!

Indeed a large portion of the book seems to be devoted to both Mehmed and Suliman!

Lots of good stuff, some most likely only found in this book!


Thanks, I read that but I need something that will focus more on him; primary is even better. I know a Greek named Kristovoulos wrote about him but that was mainly about the siege of Constantinople in 1453.
Λοιπόν, αδελφοί και οι συμπολίτες και οι στρατιώτες, να θυμάστε αυτό ώστε μνημόσυνο σας, φήμη και ελευθερία σας θα ε
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  Quote eaglecap Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Jun-2010 at 14:30
Originally posted by eaglecap

Originally posted by opuslola

This book, entitled "The Ottoman Centuries, The rise and fall of the Turkish Empire", by Lord Kinross (1977), while not specifically discussing "the conqueror", has to devote a great deal of space to him because of his position and deeds!

Indeed a large portion of the book seems to be devoted to both Mehmed and Suliman!

Lots of good stuff, some most likely only found in this book!


Thanks, I read that but I need something that will focus more on him; primary is even better. I know a Greek named Kristovoulos wrote about him but that was mainly about the siege of Constantinople in 1453.


No one knows of any good biographies about Mehmed-
Λοιπόν, αδελφοί και οι συμπολίτες και οι στρατιώτες, να θυμάστε αυτό ώστε μνημόσυνο σας, φήμη και ελευθερία σας θα ε
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  Quote Magnus Khan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25-Jun-2017 at 06:29
For general knowledge I recommend "Mehmed the Conqueror and His Time" By Franz Babinger, even though for a precise historian his book is not fully correct, still, it is the best of all. Just to compare it with book by John Freely "The Grand Turk" -  I wouldn't advice it. He tells some mythical details about him so it's better not to believe popular books. In addition "The Siege and the Fall of Constantinople in 1453: Historiography, Topography, and Military Studies" by Marios Philippides and Walter K. Hanak would be a nice reading, because the study is very careful.
For other works it's better to make a grand research, source by source, book by book, so yeah, I have many archives considering the history of this sultan. Such a pity there's not much full study on his great historical figure.

Bir gece ansızın gelir, krallığınızı imparatorluğuma katarım.
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  Quote Magnus Khan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25-Jun-2017 at 07:01


Mehmed II, the son of Sultan Murad II, born from Huma Hatun, on March 30, of the year 1432. During his childhood and youth Mehmed lived in three cities: Adrianople, Bursa and Manisa. He was the third son of the Sultan, and the Turkish throne was not foreseen for him, on the contrary, there were very many chances that the next sultan would be one of Mehmed's older brothers, who will ascend the throne.
However, in 1437 and 1443 both elder brothers of Mehmed died, and he became the only legitimate pretender to the throne (there was, indeed, Prince Orkhan, second cousin of Murad II, but he fled to the Byzantines in Constantinople). Although Murad II later paid attention to the training of his third son, he still ordered to give him an education appropriate to the status of the heir. Mehmed studied philosophy and sciences, he fluently spoke five languages. His father twice a time tried to retire and leave the country to his son, but Mehmed's arrogance and defiant behavior initially alienated his court and people from him.
In 1451, Sultan Murad II died. 19-year-old Mehmed took his father's throne. The beginning of his reign was marked by a war with Constantinople, the capital and the symbol of the Byzantine Empire. The capture of the city was occurred on May 29, 1453, and became a brilliant victory for the Turkish army, which immortalized the name of Mehmet among the Muslims as Ebu'l Feth - the Father of Conquest. Relying on the conquered authority, Mehmed began persecutions against the old Turkish nobility and brought slave converts to the power, his both first viziers and tutors were of Christian origin: Zaganos Pasha - the Albanian, and eunuch Sehabeddin Pasha - the Georgian.
In later wars Mehmed subordinated Thrace and Macedonia, he also went to Serbia, but here the famous Hungarian commander Janos Hunyadi in 1454 forced him to lift the siege of Semendriya, and in 1456 Christian army defeated Mehmed at Belgrade. Yet, after the death of Hunyadi, Serbia went to Mehmed (1459). Then he overthrew the empire of the Trebizond in 1461, seized Lesbos (1462), most of Bosnia (1463) and Karaman (1466-1471).
In Albania, George Kastriot resisted for a long time, and after his death (1467) the war continued with the Venetians, patrons of Albania. In 1470, Mehmed took the Negroponte from the Venetians.
In 1472, Mehmed inflicted a defeat on the Persian Shah in Cappadocia. In 1473 made his vassal of the Crimean Khan, after which he took from the Genoese Kaffa and Azov (1474).
The wars in Northern Persia against Uzun-Hasan distracted Mehmed for some time from the West. Only in 1480, Mehmed attacked the island of Rhodes, but was repelled by the Knights of the Ioannites. After taking the Ionian Islands from the Neapolitans, Mehmed gave orders to take Otranto (1480); but the Turkish garrison, without getting reinforcements from Turkey, was soon ousted from there.
The death that occurred in May 3, 1481, prevented Mehmet from moving against Rome (or Egypt - nobody knew, it's what Neshri chronicles tell). Mehmed died from the heart attack in Gebze, a district situated 30 miles southeast of Istanbul. The myths that Mehmed was poisoned by his jewish physician Jakub Pasha are not really attested to be true.


Edited by Magnus Khan - 25-Jun-2017 at 07:01
Bir gece ansızın gelir, krallığınızı imparatorluğuma katarım.
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  Quote Magnus Khan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25-Jun-2017 at 08:04
Kritovoulos also wrote about Mehmed in his work "History of Mehmed the Conqueror" Translated from the. Greek by Charles T. Riggs. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1954.
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