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Who contributed more to Mathematics?

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Poll Question: Who contributed more to Mathematics?
Poll Choice Votes Poll Statistics
4 [22.22%]
1 [5.56%]
0 [0.00%]
0 [0.00%]
7 [38.89%]
0 [0.00%]
3 [16.67%]
2 [11.11%]
0 [0.00%]
1 [5.56%]
0 [0.00%]
You can not vote in this poll

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Nurica View Drop Down
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  Quote Nurica Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Who contributed more to Mathematics?
    Posted: 31-May-2010 at 01:29
<<They certainly know but they have to learn algebra at school!>>
 
And in virtue of which miracle simple algebra makes someone "the biggest mathematician", and differential calculus, or integral calculus, or linear algebra, can't? I for one I did study math. a bit and I remember being astonished by the genius of those developping such method as those in differental and integral calculus (not taking into account the fact that, e.g., newton conceived all this trings before being 22 years old!). But I never found something to wonder in simple algebra! That dosen't mean that simple algebra doesn't require geniality to invent it: I just did wonder how otherwise than by ethnic or religious bias, those that made a muslim mathematician "the biggest" could reach such a verdict; in the last 4 centuries it was made a big, very big progress, but some people here remember, selectively, this "xxx", that knew only how to group algebraic terms...
 
You'll say now that without this knowledge, newton could not invent his differential calculus, but in this case I'll tell you that before "muslim" mathematicians were greek, egyptian and mazdaist, or sumerian mathematicians. My point is that if we can speak about "the biggest mathematicians of one certain century", or of "big mathematicians of the whole history", to make hierarchies of all mathematicians is always unjust.
 
<<I don't know what you mean, for example I think Leibniz was a German mathematician (from Leipzig in Germany), however he wrote primarily in Latin and French, don't you think so?>>
 
My question was about those making here contributions on this topic; it was a reply to your not-so-convincing assertion that here are writing (and voting) just one or 2 middle-easterners.
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Cryptic View Drop Down
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  Quote Cryptic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31-May-2010 at 05:48
Euler is near the top. Fermat was also amazing, especially considering that he did math in his spare time.

Edited by Cryptic - 31-May-2010 at 05:51
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Cyrus Shahmiri View Drop Down
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  Quote Cyrus Shahmiri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31-May-2010 at 10:12

Originally posted by Nurica

And in virtue of which miracle simple algebra makes someone "the biggest mathematician", and differential calculus, or integral calculus, or linear algebra, can't? I for one I did study math. a bit and I remember being astonished by the genius of those developping such method as those in differental and integral calculus (not taking into account the fact that, e.g., newton conceived all this trings before being 22 years old!). But I never found something to wonder in simple algebra! That dosen't mean that simple algebra doesn't require geniality to invent it: I just did wonder how otherwise than by ethnic or religious bias, those that made a muslim mathematician "the biggest" could reach such a verdict; in the last 4 centuries it was made a big, very big progress, but some people here remember, selectively, this "xxx", that knew only how to group algebraic terms...
 
You'll say now that without this knowledge, newton could not invent his differential calculus, but in this case I'll tell you that before "muslim" mathematicians were greek, egyptian and mazdaist, or sumerian mathematicians. My point is that if we can speak about "the biggest mathematicians of one certain century", or of "big mathematicians of the whole history", to make hierarchies of all mathematicians is always unjust.

First it is good to read this article: Calculus Before Newton and Leibniz by David Bressoud, I think if we analyse the development process of mathematics then the very big role of Muslim mathematicians can be certainly seen, I don't deny the roles of ancient and modern mathematicians but I believe the zenith of mathematical development was in the Medieval times.

Originally posted by Nurica

My question was about those making here contributions on this topic; it was a reply to your not-so-convincing assertion that here are writing (and voting) just one or 2 middle-easterners.

Posting and voting are two different things, it is possible someone posts but doesn't vote and vice versa, and it is impossible to know who has voted whom, so your conclusion is totally wrong.



Edited by Cyrus Shahmiri - 18-Feb-2011 at 10:13
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Nurica View Drop Down
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  Quote Nurica Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31-May-2010 at 20:59
in the doc to the link above there is nor differential or integral calculus (no wonder!); as already said, in my (maybe biased) opinion that the most important development in math. for a long time. I was really impressed by al those methods of nummerical approximation, or the methods by which newton or leibnitz made such things as calculus of an area below a curve possible. Polynomial algebra is not so impressive in my opinion, although I realize very well that for an 11th century man to develop it, it takes a lot of genius.
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  Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18-Feb-2011 at 05:14
I'm amazed that Euclid didn't get even one mention, let alone a well-deserved place in the poll. His work The Elements apart from being an excellent foundation for geometry also defined the rigorous axiomatic proof system that all of modern math is built upon. The Elements is considered to be the most influential science book of all times, its contents having been taught and studied in schools for centuries and the work itself being a direct inspiration to many important scientists and mathematicians throughout history.


Edited by abvgd - 18-Feb-2011 at 05:18
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Cryptic View Drop Down
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  Quote Cryptic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18-Feb-2011 at 10:19
Originally posted by richardvesely

apart from all these legends of mathematics, Ramanujan's contribution cannot be denied. He was an exceptional mathematical genius. 
He is probably less well known because he died at a very young age.


Edited by Cryptic - 18-Feb-2011 at 10:19
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medenaywe View Drop Down
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  Quote medenaywe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18-Feb-2011 at 18:07
Here you are:
http://fabpedigree.com/james/mathmen.htm
choose your man.
   I am concerning about ancient mathematicians that are still unknown.
  Personally answer will be:Nothing have happened inside theoretical math since Newton-Leibniz,except in areas of logical algebra and probabilities!?!Fourier and Laplace can not be neglected by me also.


Edited by medenaywe - 18-Feb-2011 at 18:44
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Delelarose View Drop Down
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  Quote Delelarose Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08-Mar-2011 at 03:06
Gauss is usually considered one of the top three mathematicians who ever lived (the other two being Archimedes and Newton), but Euler was far more prolific. Honestly, I don't even consider the two comparable. They both contributed so much to mathematics, I would feel guilty saying one was better than the other.
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