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Most one-sided battle that the underdog won?

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  Quote Voskhod Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Most one-sided battle that the underdog won?
    Posted: 10-Feb-2009 at 11:39
Originally posted by Dolphin

300.



The Spartans lost though. =P
"All the true heroes of history will be forgotten and all the villains will be remembered as heroes."
- Leo Tolstoy
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  Quote Parnell Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Feb-2009 at 14:52
Tom Barry's flying column of 104 men out maneovered a British encirclement operation of 1400 at Crossbarry. Lightly armed, they took out far more men than they lost and they broke their way through to the mountains...
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  Quote Galahadlrrp Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02-May-2009 at 05:33
--How about the Battle of Watling Street? A Roman force primarily composed of the 5000-odd men of the XIVth Legion commanded by Suetonius Paulinus, versus the British Hordes led by Boudicca--estimated as high as 120000 men. End result was Britannia was a nice peaceful Roman province for the next several hundred years.

Edited by Galahadlrrp - 02-May-2009 at 05:34
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  Quote Nenonen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-Jan-2011 at 07:20
Winter War 1939-40. One finnish ski company (with 150 soldiers) hold back, reatreat fighting one Red Army division ( 18 000).

In Suomussalmi one very week finnish division (9th D, 9 000 soldiers) (without arthillery) destroyed one motorized division (12 000) totally and made one other (18 000) escaping. Later that 9th Division attack to another Soviet division in Kuhmo, south of Suomussalmi and was destroying it before the armistice, 13th of March 1940.

Why this division was so successful? The main reason was that majority of soldiers were get used to work in very cold conditions in deep forest as lumberjacks. So fighting in temperature -30 celcius conditions was surely nothing new for these men. 


Edited by Nenonen - 27-Jan-2011 at 07:24
"Military history is nothing but a tissue of fictions and legends, only a form of literary invention; reality counts for very little in such an affair."

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  Quote Tiger of Kai Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-Jan-2011 at 11:47
Battle of Okehazama (1560)

Oda Nobunaga led a force of just over 2,000 men and defeated Imagawa Yoshimoto. Whose force is thought to have been somewhere between 30,000 and 40,000 men. The battle was a complete rout that culminated with Yoshimoto's death.
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  Quote opuslola Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-Feb-2011 at 16:34
I would promote the victory of the mysterous Catalans over the vast forces of Waltier/Gautier/Galtier, etc., de Brienne, in Greece!

The battle, that de Brienne (Bryan?) conceived as a "walkover", ended with the distruction of both himself, the "flower" of French/Flemish chivalry, and his familiy's inheritance!

The date, I think, was 1311 CE!

Of course, man for man, the Catalans or Almogavars, were possibly the greatest fighting force ever conceived!

Please read more here;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Halmyros

And please look up "the battle of Cephissus?"

Please read or examine this site?

http://www.bing.com/search?q=battle%20of%20cephissus&pc=conduit&form=CONTLB&ptag=A5DC7BAE8890B42A4A3F&conlogo=CT2392836

Edited by opuslola - 19-Feb-2011 at 17:08
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  Quote johnbryan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29-Jun-2011 at 19:13
The Battle of New Orleans, 8 January, 1815.  Andrew Jackson's rag-tag army of 4,000 largely half trained troops deceisively defeated a much larger force of some 11,000 veteran British troops, inflicting well over 2,000 killed, wounded and POW's on them before the British withdrew back to their ships in this, the last battle of the War of 1812..
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  Quote opuslola Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Dec-2013 at 21:12
I am not sure that many of you know that the so-called Battle of New Orleans, was actually fought a few miles from the city proper, and was entirely fought N. and East of the city. The English fleet sailed by S.W. Mississippi Gulf-coast, I.e. Pass Christian, into the great lake/inland lake of the Gulf of Mexico, named Lake Borgne, named after the General of the British forces facing Andrew Jackson and company.

Regards, Ron
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