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The Origins of Japanese people

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  Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: The Origins of Japanese people
    Posted: 27-Jul-2008 at 15:01

The origins of the Japanese people is not entirely clear yet. It is common for Japanese people to think that Japan is not part of Asia since it is an island, cut off from the continent. This tells a lot about how they see themselves in relation to their neighbours. But in spite of what the Japanese may think of themselves, they do not have extraterrestrial origins, and are indeed related to several peoples in Asia.

We shall have to go back a long way through history and analyse in depth the culture and language of the archipelago and try to find out whether the Japanese are indeed unique, and in what way.

During the last Ice Age, which ended approximately 15,000 years ago, Japan was connected to the continent through several land bridges, notably one linking the Ryukyu Islands to Taiwan and Kyushu, one linking Kyushu to the Korean peninsula, and another one connecting Hokkaido to Sakhalin and the Siberian mainland. In fact, the Philippines and Indonesia were also connected to the Asian mainland. This allowed migrations from China and Austronesia towards Japan, about 35,000 years ago. These were the ancestors of the modern Ryukyuans (Okinawans), and the first inhabitants of all Japan.

The Ainu came from Siberia and settled in Hokkaido and Honshu some 15,000 years ago, just before the water levels started rising again. Nowadays the Ryukuyans, the Ainus and the Japanese are considered three ethnically separate groups. We will see why.

Genetic evidence

It is now believed that the modern Japanese descend mostly from the interbreeding of the Jomon Era people (15,000-300 BCE), composed of the above Ice Age settlers, and a later arrival from China and/or Korea. Around 300 BCE, the Yayoi people crossed the see from Korea to Kyushu, bringing with them a brand new culture, based on wet rice cultivation and horses.

DNA tests have confirmed the likelihood of this hypothesis. The Y-DNA (paternal line) of the modern Japanese is composed at 50% of haplogroup O, of Sino-Korean origin. The rest is made of three haplogroups C, D and N. The 15% of haplogroups C and N, or Siberian origin, might have come through the Ainus, but more probably through the Yayoi invaders.

The 35% of haplogroup D (or DE) is the most interesting for this study. It is only found in very specific regions : the Andaman Islands (between India and Myanmar), Indonesia (only a small minority), Mongolia (also a small minority) and Tibet. It is thought to have originated in East Africa some 50,000 years before present. Those people would have migrated along the coasts of the Indian Ocean, through Indonesia, and gone up to Japan, South-East Siberia, then moved inland to Mongolia to end up in Tibet.

It likely that haplogroup D represents the settlers of Austronesian and Ainu origin. The presence of this haplogroup in a minority of Indonesian people confirms the link between the two countries. As for the Ainu, we know from the last surviving tribes of "pure" Ainu (most of whom live in Sakhalin rather than Japan) that almost all of them belong to haplogroup D. It would mean that the aboriginal people of Japan, the Ryukyuans and the Ainus, are ultimately related.

The Austronesian connection

The Indonesians, Malaysians and Philipinos originated from Southern China. They migrated on boats via Taiwan and displaced the original inhabitants that might have been related to Dravidians of Southern India. We will see below that it is possible that some of these early Austronesians may have been the ancestors of the Ice Age settlers of Japan.

From a linguistic point of view, Bahasa Indonesia/Malaysia and Japanese language share only a few similarities, but nonetheless striking ones. Apart from the very similar pronunciation in both languages, there is the same hierarchical differences in personal pronouns. For example "you" is either anda or kamu with the same meaning and usage as anata and kimi in Japanese. Likewise, the Japanese verb suki ("to like") translates suka in Bahasa. Such similarities are probably more than mere coincidences, and may reveal a common origin. Furthermore, in both languages the plural can be formed by simply doubling the word. For instance, in Japanese hito means "person", while hitobito means "people". Likewise ware means "I" or "you", whereas wareware means "we". Doubling of words in Japanese is so common that there is a special character used only to mean the word is doubled (々) in written Japanese. In Bahasa, this way of forming the plural is almost systematical (person is orang, while people is orang-orang). Expressions like ittekimasu, itteirashai, tadaima and okaeri, used to greet someone who leaves or enter a place, and which have no equivalent in Indo-European languages, have exact equivalents in Indonesian (selamat jalan, selamat tinggal...).

Another evidence of the migration of haplogroup D from the Indian Ocean to Japan is that Tamil language (from Tamil Nadu in South India) also bears some uncanny similarities with Japanese language. Naturally, these languages having evolved separately for maybe 40,000 years, only a tiny fraction of the common roots have subsisted, but enough to confirm that such a common origin might indeed have existed, in a very distant past.

Japanese matsuri (festivals) resemble so much Balinese ones that one could wonder if one was not copied from the other. During cremations in Bali, the dead body is carried on a portable shrine, very much in the way that the Japanese carry their mikoshi. Balinese funerals are joyful and people swinging the portable shrine in the streets and making loud noise to scare the evil spirits. Basically, Balinese religion is a form of Hinduism that has incorporated the aborigenal animist religion. Japanese Shintoism is also a variety of animism, and is practised side-by-side with Buddhism, a religion derived from Hinduism (Buddha himslef was born a Hindu). There are lots of other cultural similarities between ancient cultures of Indonesia and Japan. For example, both Balinese temples and Japanese shrines, as well as traditional Japanese and Balinese houses have a wall surrounding them, originally meant tp prevent evil spririts from penetrating the property. Despite the radical changes that Indonesian culture underwent after the introduction of Islam and Christianity, and the changes that Buddhism brought to Japan, it is still possible to observe clear similarities between the supposed original prehistoric cultures of the two archipelagoes.

The Korean connection

Japanese and Korean languages are both classified by linguists as Altaic languages, along with Mongolic, Tungusic and Turkic, among others. Nevertheless, Japanese is so distant from Mongolic and Turkic than the common points are hardly more evident than those with Indonesian or even Tamil.

Korean language, however, is much closer to Japanese. The grammar is very similar, and both have imported about half of their vocabulary from Chinese, which makes these three languages almost mutually understable in the written form

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  Quote omshanti Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27-Jul-2008 at 16:25
Just in case anyone wondered, the text is from this site: http://www.jref.com/culture/origins_japanese_people.shtml#

Edited by omshanti - 27-Jul-2008 at 16:52
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  Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13-Sep-2008 at 05:21
http://www.kahaku.go.jp/special/past/japanese/ipix/5/5-14.html
More about the research:
In recent years, more archaeological and genetic evidence have been found in both eastern China and western Japan to lend credibility to this argument. Between 1996 and 1999, a team led by Satoshi Yamaguchi, a researcher at Japan's National Science Museum, compared Yayoi remains found in Japan's Yamaguchi and Fukuoka prefectures with those from early Han Dynasty (202 BC-8) in China's coastal Jiangsu province, and found many similarities between the skulls and limbs of Yayoi people and the Jiangsu remains.[8] Two Jiangsu skulls showed spots where the front teeth had been pulled, a practice common in Japan in the Yayoi and preceding Jōmon period. The genetic samples from three of the 36 Jiangsu skeletons also matched part of the DNA base arrangements of samples from the Yayoi remains.

Surprisingly, Japanese also display the highest frequency of haplogroup O3a5, which is a Han Chinese and Sino-Tibetan specific O3 branch.

http://www.genetics.org/cgi/content-nw/full/172/4/2431/TBL1

Xue et. al.

Japanese
Haplogroup O3a5 (O3e)  10/47= 23%

This frequency is about 5% higher than the frequency of O3a5 among Manchus, Koreans and other Northeast Asians.
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  Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15-Sep-2008 at 09:48
The O3a3 branch of O3 occurs at higher frequencies among Manchus, Hmong-Mien people and Koreans suggesting that Koreans and Manchus are related to Hmong-Mien people, who are thought to have originated in Northeast Asia and eventually driven out by the Han Chinese to Southeast Asia and Southern China.
http://hmongstudies.org/GYLeeHSJ8.pdf


O3 (M122) distributed throughout Central Asia, East Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Austronesian regions of Oceania, with O3a3 (LINE1, M159) represented in Hmong-Mien people; and O3a5 (M134) in Sino-Tibetan peoples.


So the haplogroup O3 found among Koreans and Manchurians are related to the southeast Asian ethnic groups (Miao, Hmong) who also live in China and the haplogroup O3 found among Japanese are related to the Sino-Tibetan ethnic groups (Han Chinese) who live predominantly in China.


Edited by zstripe - 15-Sep-2008 at 09:51
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  Quote Leonidas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Oct-2008 at 10:45
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  Quote pebbles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Oct-2008 at 13:16
 
The Fallacy of Sinophobia ....

There is a major misconception that has been pushing certain Japanese and Korean scholars to find non-Chinese origin for them to feel safe, but the source of their fear was a phantom, a propagandist claim within their neo-Confucian factions that used sinocentrist rhetoric of their times to gain unfair advantage over liberalist ideas.

One need not fight a Chinese enemy that does not exist.The great diversity of the origin and evolution of Chinese civilization that has been gaining steady momentum should rid the need for pursuing a non-Chinese origin for there is no such thing as a single Chinese origin.

It is to point out the fact that many Japanese and Korean sources blindedly followed the "Out-of-Lake Baikal/Mongol Hypothesis of Japanese/Korean Origin" which has become rather popular during the 1970's in the so-called Egami's "Horserider Theory of Japanese Origin.".

J. Edward Kidder, Jr. covered the history of horses in Japan in his article "The Archaeology of the Early Horse-Riders in Japan".He also provided some great evidence that discredits a few pillars of Egami's horseriders theory.

Horserider Theory,first proposed by Egami and modified by Ledyard, is about the invasion from the continent through Korea of a horse-riding tribe who conquered Japan and founded the Yamato state around 4th century AD. But this theory has few supporters nowadays, as it has been heavily criticized from an archeological point of view.
 
 
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  Quote pebbles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Oct-2008 at 13:22
 
Here is one academic research on ' dual origins ' of the Japanese.

A set of 81 Y chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was used to trace the origins of Paleolithic and Neolithic components of the Japanese paternal gene pool, and to determine the relative contribution of Jomon and Yayoi Y chromosome lineages to modern Japanese. Our global sample consisted of >2,500 males from 39 Asian populations, including six populations sampled from across the Japanese archipelago. Japanese populations were characterized by the presence of two major (D and O) and two minor (C and N) clades of Y chromosomes, each with several sub-lineages. Haplogroup D chromosomes were present at 34.7% and were distributed in a U-shaped pattern with the highest frequency in the northern Ainu and southern Ryukyuans. In contrast, haplogroup O lineages (51.8%) were distributed in an inverted U-shaped pattern with a maximum frequency on Kyushu. Coalescent analyses of Y chromosome short tandem repeat diversity indicated that haplogroups D and C began their expansions in Japan ~20,000 and ~12,000 years ago, respectively, while haplogroup O-47z began its expansion only ~4,000 years ago. We infer that these patterns result from separate and distinct genetic contributions from both the Jomon and the Yayoi cultures to modern Japanese, with varying levels of admixture between these two populations across the archipelago. The results also support the hypothesis of a Central Asian origin of Jomonese ancestors, and a Southeast Asian origin of the ancestors of the Yayoi, contra previous models based on morphological and genetic evidence.

Source: http://www.springerlink.com/content/p31g0300430k6215/
 
In geographic accuracy,SE Asia ( which has been false representative of Thailand Vietnam Burma Cambodia,these nations are nowhere near eastern part of Asia continent ) is China's coastal region of Jiangsu & Zhejiang provinces ( we can include China's Fujian & Canton by default for being parts of a same continental country ).


Edited by pebbles - 20-Oct-2008 at 20:36
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  Quote pebbles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Oct-2008 at 13:32
 
Japanese are more ' mud ' than you all previously believed.

Japan's foremost nationalist,Tokyo Gov. Shintaro Ishihara, wrote in 1968, for example, that Japan was effectively a homogenous country that had maintained an "absolutely original culture" for centuries.

26 years later,he refuted his own words.

In Ishihara's 1994 book "No-to-ieru Asia" ("Asia that can say no"), however, he described the perception of Japan as an ethnically homogeneous country as absurd, stating that Japan is a mixture of "all the ethnic groups in Asia."
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  Quote pebbles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Oct-2008 at 13:38
 
Linguistics is not the sole barometer of ethnic groups.

There certinly isn't any evidence that Korean and Japanese are Altaic Languages. It's just something some Finnish Scientist made up and everyone else just assumed to be true. Korean is similar, if not related, to Japanese. They are Grammatically pretty identical where as vocabulary wise they are no.

Since when did language groups denote race ?

Japanese language indeed has some characteristics that make it close to the Altaic languages (Turkic, Mongolian, Manchu-Tungusic, Korean), but the Altaic languages don't constitue a genetic language family, as Indo-European for example. Their similarities come from cohabitation and borrowing. It is thus not surprising that Japanese would share some of those similarities with NE Asia.

Those words are identical because they are borrowings of the same word in Chinese .... i.e. .. kazoku, sentaku

the Ainu are definitely Asians, and more precisely proto-Mongoloids (not mongolians!). It is clear from biologic studies.People from Okinawa and other Ryukyu islands are closer to Jomon people and to Aynu than Mainland Japanese. And they speak what we call "Ryukyuan", a sister language of Japanese, not related to the languages of Taiwan.

What I meant is that all Japanese and Ainu are a mixture of Jomon and Yayoi, and the Jomon element is the strongest in Aynu first, Ryukyuans second, and Mainland Japanese last. So, while they remain close to the Mainland Japanese, Ryukyuan people have also a quite strong affinity with Ainu.

 
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  Quote pebbles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Oct-2008 at 14:13
 
It is not only Japanese people who recognize that the Ryukyuan languages belong in the same family as the Japanese language/dialects. Any student of linguistics can guarantee you that the Ryukyuan and Japanese languages share a very large percentage of cognate vocabulary.This is a very soundly established fact; it should not be considered alongside the likes of ridiculous attempts to relate the Japanese language to  .. Hawaiian .. Korean .. Basque .. or whatever.
 
To anyone who knows Japanese, these words look and sound like some sort of weird Japanese dialect, and not a truly foreign language. More importantly, regular "laws" of sound change can be formulated to explain the development of the observed Ryukyuan forms and the observed Japanese forms from their common ancestral language, Proto-Japanese-Ryukyuan ( or Proto-Japonic, whatever you may call it ).

For example, here is a list of the first four words in the "Adjectives" section of the online Nakijin Dialect Dictionary (includes voice samples):

/?a'iguruuseN/ ("rare, seldom occurring") = Japanese */ar-i-gurusi-i/ ("painfully difficult to be") (This word does not actually exist in Japanese, but it hypothetically could, and it would be cognate with the Nakijin form.)

/?a[?k]aaseN/ ("red") = Japanese /aka-i/ ("red")

/?aQseN/ ("shallow") = Japanese /asa-i/ ("shallow")

/?aQcibeeseN/ ("walks with a fast pace, to be a fast walker") = Japanese */aruk-i-baya-i/ (hypothetically could exist in Japanese with the same meaning, but Japanese people do not actually use this expression)
 
Some distinctions between Japanese and Central Okinawan (Shuri).

あ、い、う、え、お is usually あ、い、う、い、う
thus かぜ becomes かじ、 こめ becomes くみ、そば becomes すば

い in JPN adjectives = さん
あまい=あまさん、あつい=あちさん、おもしろい=うむさん、やすい=やっさん、など

And so, I repeat, Japanese and Ryukyuan languages are indisputably related.
 
If anything, the Koreans and Japanese should see themselves more as having a common history of imported Chinese language and philosophy.Their languages have gotten more similar over time.
 

 
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  Quote Bernard Woolley Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Oct-2008 at 02:35

Just to correct some truly bizarre statements:

Originally posted by pebbles

There certinly isn't any evidence that Korean and Japanese are Altaic Languages. It's just something some Finnish Scientist made up and everyone else just assumed to be true. Korean is similar, if not related, to Japanese. They are Grammatically pretty identical where as vocabulary wise they are no.

Shared grammer is an extremely strong indicator of linguistic relationships. If two languages have the same grammar, but different vocabulary, it suggests that they began as the same language but picked up different outside influences later.

Originally posted by pebbles

Their similarities come from cohabitation and borrowing. It is thus not surprising that Japanese would share some of those similarities with NE Asia.

Originally posted by pebbles

It is not only Japanese people who recognize that the Ryukyuan languages belong in the same family as the Japanese language/dialects. Any student of linguistics can guarantee you that the Ryukyuan and Japanese languages share a very large percentage of cognate vocabulary.

Actually, languages that develop shared vocabulary but have different grammar are usually considered to have different roots, but long co-habitation.

Originally posted by pebbles

Since when did language groups denote race ?

Never. You're boxing with shadows.

Originally posted by pebbles

Japanese language indeed has some characteristics that make it close to the Altaic languages (Turkic, Mongolian, Manchu-Tungusic, Korean), but the Altaic languages don't constitue a genetic language family, as Indo-European for example.

Wait a minute...so Indo-European languages, unlike Altaic ones, ARE genetically determined? That doesn't make any sense. There's no such thing as a "genetic language family."

Originally posted by pebbles

If anything, the Koreans and Japanese should see themselves more as having a common history of imported Chinese language and philosophy.Their languages have gotten more similar over time.

Out of curiosity, what is your source on this? What about the Japanese and Korean languages and cultures leads you to believe that their roots lie in China? Why do you think that their linguistic similarity is the result of Chinese influence, when their similar elements (grammar, as you said above) are not shared by Chinese language?

Originally posted by pebbles

There is a major misconception that has been pushing certain Japanese and Korean scholars to find non-Chinese origin for them to feel safe, but the source of their fear was a phantom, a propagandist claim within their neo-Confucian factions that used sinocentrist rhetoric of their times to gain unfair advantage over liberalist ideas.

One need not fight a Chinese enemy that does not exist.The great diversity of the origin and evolution of Chinese civilization that has been gaining steady momentum should rid the need for pursuing a non-Chinese origin for there is no such thing as a single Chinese origin.

Indeed, there is no need for Japan and Korea to fight China, and China is a wonderful, diverse place. However, the fact that many things come from China doesn't mean that everything comes from China.

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  Quote Leonidas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Oct-2008 at 12:25
Originally posted by pebbles

 
Japanese are more ' mud ' than you all previously believed.


  what do you mean by this?


Edited by Leonidas - 21-Oct-2008 at 12:35
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  Quote pebbles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Oct-2008 at 12:36
Originally posted by Bernard Woolley

There's no such thing as a "genetic language family."

Out of curiosity, what is your source on this? What about the Japanese and Korean languages and cultures leads you to believe that their roots lie in China? Why do you think that their linguistic similarity is the result of Chinese influence.

 

 
 
Yea ... tell it to hypernationalist Korean wackos and non-NE Asian surrogates pushing their pro-Japanese & Korean relatedness or non-Chinese origin of Japanese & Korean ' agenda ' here and elsewhere in cyberspace LOL
 
Both Japanese & Korean languages shared 50%-60% ' Chinese ' vocabulary.
 
 
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  Quote pebbles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Oct-2008 at 12:40
Originally posted by Leonidas

Originally posted by pebbles

 
Japanese are more ' mud ' than you all previously believed.


  what do you mean by this?
 
 
Don't the Japanese always pride themselves as ethnically homogeneous  LOL
 
 
* Professor Masao Oka on " Race,Ethnicity,Migration of Japan ",an archaeologist noted the Japanese people came from 5 population groups.

(1) north-eastern Asiatic Tungusic
(2) Austro-Asiatic
(3) Altaic group
(4) south-eastern Asiatic group of Austronesian origin
(5) ethnic group of Melanesian origin
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  Quote Leonidas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Oct-2008 at 12:40
http://www.scs.uiuc.edu/~mcdonald/WorldHaplogroupsMaps.pdf

Japanese are pretty unique, haplo D only shared by tibetan and adaman islanders. i came across this before the d group
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  Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Oct-2008 at 12:41
Plot for japanese people and other asian people based on Y-chromosome comparison and distances:
 
Abstract:
Based on the frequencies of these two clades (my note - Y haplogroups D, O-P31 and O-M 122, which account for 86.9% of Japanese Y haplogroups), we estimate the Jomon contribution to modern Japanese to be 40.3%, with the highest frequency in the Ainu (75%) and Ryukyuans (60%). On the other hand, Yayoi Y chromosomes account for 51.9% of Japanese paternal lineages, with the highest contribution in Kyushu (62.3%) and lower contributions in Okinawa (37.8%) and northern Honshu (46.2%). Interestingly there is no evidence of Yayoi lineages in the Ainu.
 
...and...
In summary, our data suggest that Paleolithic male lineages entered Japan at least 12,000-20,000 years ago from Central Asia, and were isolated for thousands of years once land bridges between Japan and continental Asia disappeared at the end of the last glacial maximum (~12,000 years ago). More recently, Y chromosomes that originated in Southeast Asia expanded to Korea and Japan with the spread of wet rice agriculture. The ages and spatial patterns of haplogroups D and O in Japan are concordant with the hypothesis that Y chromosomes spread via a process of demic difussion during the Yayoi period (Sokal and Thomso, 1998). Each of the populations carrying these differentiated lineages made separate contributions to modern Japanese, both genetically and culturally. In contrast to previous models, we propose that the Yayoi Y chromosomes descend from prehistoric farmers that had their origins in Southeastern Asia, perhaps going back to the origin of agriculture in this region. This places the Yayoi in the context of other population expansions stimulated by the acquisition of agriculture, whereby farmer societies gained advantage over hunter-gatherer societies (Diamond and Bellwood, 2003). In this case, however the Jomon hunter gatherers may have held off the onslaught of farmers for thousands of years as a result of their highly succesful brand of subsistence. The dramatic Yayoi transition may have been triggered in 400 B.C. by a combination of developments, such as rice field irrigation, cold-resistant rice strains, an increasing Korean population and the invention of iron tools for producing farming implements (Diamond 1998). The data indicate, however, that Jomon genes survive in contemporary Japanese, possibly because their unique and varied culture complemented that of the immigrant famers.
 
From Michael F. Hammer et al. (2005)
 
Cheers!


Edited by Azvarohi - 21-Oct-2008 at 13:04
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  Quote Leonidas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Oct-2008 at 12:51
Originally posted by pebbles

Originally posted by Leonidas

Originally posted by pebbles

 
Japanese are more ' mud ' than you all previously believed.


  what do you mean by this?
 
 
Don't the Japanese always pride themselves as ethnically homogeneous  LOL
 
 
They are one ethnic group?!? Aniu excepted, japan is pretty much one ethnic society.

 wow, everyone has multi- ancestry nothing unique here. i do but i dont walk around saying i am a 'pie chart', nope im greek. Ethnos (nationality) is perceved and yes interchanged with genos (blood line) but that is a human condition. Not a japanese one.
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  Quote pebbles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Oct-2008 at 13:19
 
 
Jared Diamond's ' Japanese Roots ' is a joke,he wrote it in 1998 Discovery Magazine .... it's the article set-off ' Japanese & Korean blood tie obsession frenzy frantic.gif '  in cyberspace since 2005.In all honesty,it's quite disturbing and pathetic.
 
 
 
 
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  Quote pebbles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Oct-2008 at 14:54
 
One fundamental is that majority typical Japanese have sharp narrower small faces and slender built oppose to broader-faced Koreans with big-bone bulky physical built.
 
In term of looks,Japanese and Korean look quite different.
 

Great disparity of these basic physical characteristics is sufficient to ' debunk ' any argument that Japanese and Koreans are more closely related than with other NE Asian groups.
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  Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21-Oct-2008 at 22:59
Originally posted by pebbles

 
One fundamental is that majority typical Japanese have sharp narrower small faces and slender built oppose to broader-faced Koreans with big-bone bulky physical built.
 
In term of looks,Japanese and Korean look quite different.
 
Well, it´s true that physical anthropology can help when looking at people that share a same origin ... but(!) you´ll find north europeans with broad faces, broad shouldered  broad noses, dark hair, pale skin that have the same origin as long faced, slender built, narrow nosed and blonde people, both when comparing Y-DNA and mtDNA.
 
Facial features within the same race are often the result of adaptation, nutrition, sexual selection, living conditions etc.
 
Koreans and japaneses do differ when looking at genetics, but not much more (probaly a little more) than central european and italians do IMO. Both are represented as seperated by two natural barries:
 
Korea vs Japan: The Korea strait.
Central Europe vs Italy: The Alps.
 
...it´s also regional when looking on how close the japaneses are to other EA people (as seen in the chart I posted above), it´s a distance, but not THAT much of a distance.


Edited by Azvarohi - 21-Oct-2008 at 23:41
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