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Today in Womens History

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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Today in Womens History
    Posted: 05-Apr-2012 at 00:29
April 4th:

In 1873 Ferguson and another Mount Holyoke graduate (1862), Anna Bliss, moved to Cape Town, South Africa and established the first women's college in the region, Huguenot College in 1898. Abbie Park Ferguson was president of Huguenot College (which eventually became Huguenot University College) until her retirement in 1910.She took a leave to return to the United States from 1905 to 1906 during which time she received an M.A. from Mount Holyoke. In 1912, Mount Holyoke honored her with a Doctor of Letters.She died at Huguenot on March 25, 1919, aged 82..."http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abbie_Park_Ferguson


http://www.saao.ac.za/~wpk/tov1882/yfergsn.jpg

    1869: Anna Elizabeth Broomall admitted to Pennsylvania Hospital to study medicine

    1872: Mary Coffin Ware Dennett born

    "...American women's rights activist, pacifist, homeopath, and pioneer in the areas of birth control, sex education, and women's suffrage. She co-founded the Voluntary Parenthood League, served in the National American Women's Suffrage Association, co-founded the Twilight Sleep Association, and wrote a famous pamphlet on sex education and birth control....

    ...After William Sanger's arrest for distributing birth control information inspired a resurgence in the American birth control movement, Dennett co-founded The National Birth Control League in 1915 with Jesse Ashley and Clara Gruening Stillman.[29] Dennett decided to start by rallying public support to strike down laws restricting birth control information. Later, as the NBCL faltered, she resigned as executive secretary and founded a new organization, the Voluntary Parenthood League. [30] She used methods like lobbying and lectures to promote the cause...."http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Dennett

    http://academic.evergreen.edu/k/klalor09/m_w_dennett.jpg

    1881: Maude Frazier born

    "... She was the first female Lieutenant Governor of Nevada.[2] Before entering politics, Frazier was a teacher, principal and school superintendent. She was a member of the Democratic Party

Frazier served in the Nevada Assembly from her first election in 1950 until 1962, when she was appointed Lieutenant Governor by Gov. Grant Sawyer to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Rex Bell. She served the remaining six months in Bell's term, retired and died within a year of leaving office.[3]In the legislature, Frazier was the driving force behind the establishment of the first public college in southern Nevada, which eventually became the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The first building on the campus was named Maude Frazier Hall and completed in 1957.[2]..." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maude_Frazier

http://www.1st100.com/part1/photos/maude-frazier-01.jpg

     1889: Dorothy Lerner Gordon, an American musician, broadcaster and writer,  born.

    "...n 1923, she began her broadcasting career when the Women’s League of the United Synagogue of America invited her to do a recital of folk songs on the radio. During the 1920s, however, Gordon saw radio primarily as a means of advertising. As she traveled around the country performing, she would stop at local radio stations for an interview and perhaps sing a few songs. At first, she disliked the medium because she felt that performers needed contact with their audience. But by the 1930s, as she witnessed the potential reach and educational benefits of radio, she became a strong advocate.

During the 1930s, she moved more directly into commercial radio. She became the musical director of the American School of the Air, a five-day-a-week program that examined a different topic each day—history, geography, science, current events, and music. She was the “Song and Story Lady” on the Children’s Corner, where she narrated and dramatized folk stories. As well, in 1939 she produced Yesterday’s Children, a program that featured the favorite childhood books of a famous person. After telling or dramatizing the story, Gordon would have that week’s guest explain why he or she had loved that story as a child. Throughout this period, Gordon continued to tour the country doing live performances. It was on these tours that she discovered the breadth of the radio audience. Radio, she learned, was bringing literature and music to rural Americans...."http://jwa.org/encyclopedia/article/gordon-dorothy-lerner

      1928: Maya Angelou born

    http://photo.goodreads.com/authors/1282621669p5/3503.jpg

    1931: Anna Elizabeth Broomall, a medical educator, obsestricist and gynecologist, died .

    "...Dr. Broomall was professor of obstetrics for the next twenty years, also acting as a gynecologist for the Quaker-run Friend's Asylum for the Insane in Philadelphia. She published several case studies based on her work and undertook an extensive inspection and public lecture tour which took her as far as India and Asia to visit former students on missionary duty there. Dr. Broomall retired from practice in 1903, volunteering instead as librarian and curator at the Delaware County Historical Society. Given her goals and the obstacles she faced, it should be no surprise that Broomall was described as a tough teacher, even "alarming," in her drive to instill in students a sense of the obstetrician's responsibility to patients...." http://www.nlm.nih.gov/changingthefaceofmedicine/physicians/biography_45.html


Dr. Anna Elizabeth Broomall

    1984: Authorities broke up the Greenham Common Women's Peace Camp (Berkshire, England) (story)


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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06-Apr-2012 at 01:07
April 5th:
1971 - Fran Phipps is 1st woman to reach North Pole

Births:
1472Bianca Maria Sforza, Holy Roman Empress , second wife of Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor (d. 1510)
File:Bernhard Strigel 009.jpg
1692Adrienne Lecouvreur, French actress (d. 1730)
Adrienne Lecouvreur, pastel 1726. This picture depicts Lecouvreur in the role of the tragic Cornelia in Pierre Corneille’s “The Death of Pompey” (1642).
File:Adrienne lecouvreur dans cornlie.jpg

1863Princess Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine (d. 1950)
File:Victoria Hesse 1863.jpg

1693Anne, Duchess of Montpensier, French writer (b. 1627)
English: Portrait of Anne Marie Louise d'Orléans, Duchess of Montpensier, also referred to as La Grande Mademoiselle
File:AnneMarieLouiseMontpensier02.jpg

Also:

    1614: Pocahontas married John Rolfe

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/07/Pocahontas.jpg/170px-Pocahontas.jpg

    1758: Mary Jemison ("White Woman of the Genesee") captured by French soldiers and Shawnee Indians, later sold to the Senecas who adopted her . Thouh she had chanced to leave the Senecas later in life, she didn't do it.

    http://www.barehandsdesign.com/gettysburghistories/images/jemison.jpg

    1761: Sybil Ludington , the "female Paul Revere" born

    http://runner.org/sybil.jpg

    1825: Mary Jane Hawes Holmes, an American novelist, born .

    "...Mary Jane Holmes (April 5, 1825 – October 6, 1907)[1] was a bestselling and prolific American author who published 39 popular novels, as well as short stories. Her first novel sold 250,000 copies; and she had total sales of 2 million books in her lifetime, second only to Harriet Beecher Stowe.

Portraying domestic life in small town and rural settings, she examined gender relationships, as well as those of class and race. She also dealt with slavery and the American Civil War, with a strong sense of moral justice. Since the late 20th century, she has received fresh recognition and reappraisal, although her popular work was excluded from most 19th-century literary histories compiled by men...."http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Jane_Holmes

Mary Jane Holmes


    1873: Nellie Neilson born [image]

    1876: Mary Elizabeth Bass , one of the 2 women physicians in 1911, born .

    http://www.library.umc.edu/women/images/first.4.gif

    1885?: Fania (or Fannia or Fanny) Mary Cohn , an American Labor leader and educator, born.

    1901: Hattie Elizabeth Alexander born . She was:

    "... a dedicated pediatrician, medical educator, and researcher in microbiology, won international recognition for deriving a serum to combat influenzal meningitis, a common disease that previously had been nearly always fatal to infants and young children. Alexander subsequently investigated microbiological genetics and the processes whereby bacteria, through genetic mutation, acquire resistance to antibiotics. In 1964, as president of the American Pediatric Society, she became one of the first women to head a nationalmedical association.,,,"

Bette Davis

    1989: March for Women's Lives held



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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07-Apr-2012 at 02:41
April 6th:

    1867: Kate Campbell Hurd-Mead , a pioneering feminist and obsestritian, born

    "...Hurd-Mead was one of the original founders and the consulting gynecologist at the Middlesex County Hospital in Connecticut from 1907 until her retirement in 1925.[3]She also helped to organize the Middletown District Nurses Association (1900), was vice president of the State Medical Society of Connecticut (1913-1914), president of the American Medical Women's Association, and organizer of the Medical Women's International Association (1919).

At a meeting of the Johns Hopkins Historical Club in 1890 she had become interested in the history of women physicians. She conducted extensive research and published Medical Women of America (1933) and in 1938 the first comprehensive history of women's role in medicine, A History of Women in Medicine: From the Earliest of Times to the Beginning of the Nineteenth Century.[4]

She argued strongly for the real existence of Trotula, the Sicilian woman physician of the Middle Ages, who some historians had tried to argue was not a real person but a name for a collection of works.[5]Dr. Hurd-Mead died at the age of 73 in a bushfire near her home while trying to assist her caretaker who also died in the fire.[2].." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kate_Campbell_Hurd-Mead



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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08-Apr-2012 at 01:45
April 7th:

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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09-Apr-2012 at 02:24
April 8th:

    1141: the Empress Matilda was proclaimed Lady of the English ("domina anglorum" or "Anglorum Domina" or "Angliae Normanniaeque domina") by a clergy council at Winchester, supported by the Bishop of Winchester, Henry of Blois, brother of Stephen, who had seized the throne despite Matilda's claim to it as her father's named successor

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c3/Empress_Mathilda.png/220px-Empress_Mathilda.png

    1827: Barbara Bodichon born (artist, women's rights advocate)

    http://www-lib.girton.cam.ac.uk/images/B%20Bodichon%201.jpg

    1865: Albion Fellows Bacon born

    "...Albion Fellows Bacon (1865-1933), writer and reformer, was born in Evansville, Indiana, where she actively worked with local charities, two of which evolved into the YWCA and the Visiting Nurse Association. She is most noted for her vigorous campaign to improve substandard housing, persuading the Indiana legislature to pass a housing reform bill in the early twentieth century. Bacon was also involved with the Indiana Child Welfare Association and the Commission on Child Welfare, as well as other social agencies. Some of her writings recount her career as a reformer, while others relate her spiritual experiences. Bacon was the sister of Annie Fellows Johnston, an author who achieved national acclaim for her Little Colonel series, which was later converted to films starring Shirley Temple...."http://www.willard.lib.in.us/programs_and_services/archives/primary_source_manuscripts.php

    1893: Mary Pickford , and American actress, born

    http://www.heavenandearthandyou.com/images/Photos/MaryPickford.jpg

    1904: Grace Arabella Goldsmith born

    "...Dean, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, 1967-1973
    Chairman, Department of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, 1967 - 1974
    Chairman, Department of Nutrition (SPHTM), 1967 - 1969

Dr. Goldsmith was internationally recognized as a clinical nutritionist and authority on dietary diseases. Her work established niacin deficiency as the cause of pellagra and also established the metabolism and minimum requirements for tryptophan and niacin.

In addition, Dr. Goldsmith was:

  • responsible for clarification of the specific roles of folic acid and vitamin B-12 in the diet
  • established criteria for evaluating nutritional status pertaining to anemias
  • an early advocate of the relationship between atherosclerosis and dietary fat and lipids



Edited by Don Quixote - 09-Apr-2012 at 02:26
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10-Apr-2012 at 02:16
April 9th:

    1483: King Edward IV died, leaving his wife, Elizabeth Woodville, without the ability to protect her son Edward's claim to the throne.

    http://www.medievalhistory.net/pict1001.jpg

    1484: Edward, Prince of Wales, the only son of Richard III and Anne Neville, died, leaving Richard without any sons (or daughters) as heirs.

    http://www.shakespeareandhistory.com/resources/Historical_Figures/Anne%20Neville,%20Queen%20of%20England.jpg

    1827: Maria Susanna Cummins, an American novelist, born

    "...Maria Susanna Cummins was born in Salem, Massachusetts, on April 9, 1827. She was the daughter of Honorable David Cummins and Maria F. Kittredge, and was the eldest of four children from that marriage. The Cummins family resided in the neighborhood of Dorchester in Boston, Massachusetts. Cummins' father encouraged her to become a writer at an early age. She studied at Mrs. Charles Sedgwick's Young Ladies School in Lenox, Massachusetts.[1]

In 1854, she published the novel The Lamplighter, a sentimental book which was widely popular and which made its author well-known. One reviewer called it "one of the most original and natural narratives".[2] Within eight weeks, it sold 40,000 copies and totaled 70,000 by the end of its first year in print.[3] She wrote other books, including Mabel Vaughan (1857), none of which had the same success. Cummins also published in some of the popular periodicals of her day...."http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_Susanna_Cummins

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-h7w1thrgFDw/TZ8IHSW97zI/AAAAAAAAAU8/P7dZxJ9Q3J4/s1600/cummins.jpg


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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-Apr-2012 at 02:21
April 10th:

    628: a total eclipse is blamed for the death of Empress Suiko in Japan

    http://www.guide2womenleaders.com/womeninpower/fotos/suiko_japan.jpg

    1835: Ellen Louise Chandler Moulton born

    "..She was born in 1835, the daughter of Lucius L. Chandler, in Pomfret, Connecticut. In 1855, she married a Boston publisher, William U. Moulton (d. 1898), under whose auspices her earliest literary work had appeared in The True Flag. Her first volume of collected verse and prose, This, That and the Other (1854), was followed by a story, Juno Clifford (1855), and by My Third Book (1859); her literary output was then interrupted until 1873 when she resumed activity with Bed-time Stories, the first of a series of volumes, including Firelight Stories (1883) and Stories told at Twilight (1890).[1]

Meanwhile she had taken an important place in American literary society, writing regular critiques for the New York Tribune from 1870 to 1876 and a weekly literary letter for the Sunday issue of the Boston Herald from 1886 to 1892. In 1876 she published a volume of notable Poems (renamed Swallow flights in the English edition of 1877) and visited Europe, where she began close and lasting friendships with leading men and women of letters.[1]

Thenceforward she spent the summers in London and the rest of the year in Boston, where her salon was one of the principal resorts of literary talent. In 1889 another volume of verse, In the Garden of Dreams, confirmed her reputation as a poet. She also wrote several volumes of prose fiction, including Miss Eyre from Boston and Other Stories, and some descriptions of travel, including Lazy Tours in Spain (1896). She was well known for the extent of her literary influence, the result of a sympathetic personality combined with fine critical taste. She died in Boston on 10 August 1908.[1]..." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louise_Chandler_Moulton


    1850: Fanny Lily Gypsy Davenport, an American stage actress, born

    "...The daughter of Edward Loomis Davenport and Fanny Vining, she was born in London, England, but was brought to America when a child and educated in the Boston public schools. When seven years old she appeared at the Howard Athenæum in Boston, as the child of Metamora, but her real début occurred in 1862.

In February, 1862, she appeared in New York at Niblo's Garden at the age of twelve as the King of Spain in Faint Heart Never Won Fair Lady. Later (1869) she was a member of Augustin Daly's company; and afterwards, with a company of her own, acted with especial success in Sardou's Fedora (1883), Cleopatra (1890), and similar plays. She took over emotional Sardou roles that had been originated in Europe by Sarah Bernhardt. Her last appearance was in Chicago at the Grand Opera House on the 25th of March 1898, shortly before her death.

Her first husband was Edwin B. Price, an actor. They married in 1879 and later divorced. She was the wife of Mr. Willet Melbourne MacDowell (later a silent movie actor), her second husband, whom she married in 1889. She died in Duxbury, Massachusetts. She was the aunt of actress Dorothy Davenport... " http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fanny_Davenport


Fanny Davenport, ca. 1897

While she was president of Wellesley College from 1949 until her retirement in 1966, the college's resources and facilities were expanded substantially. Clapp was a strong advocate of careers for women.After leaving Wellesley, Clapp served briefly as administrator of Lady Doak College, a women's college in Madurai, India, then as United States cultural attaché to India, then as minister-councilor of public affairs in the United States Information Agency until her retirement in 1971. The library at Wellesley is named for her.[3]..." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_Clapp

President Margaret Clapp Addressing the Freshmen, Who Mary Felt Did Not Talk Down to Them Photographic Print


    1930: Dolores Huerta , an American labor leader and civil rights activist, born

    http://www.girlsforachange.org/girl-space/huerta_dolores.jpg


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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12-Apr-2012 at 02:54
April 11th:
1775 - The last execution for witchcraft in Germany takes place.

    1492: Marguerite of Navarre (Marguerite of Angoulême) born (Queen of Navarre, Renaissance writer, humanist patroness)

    http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/picture-of-month/graphics/small/princess_marguerite.jpg

    1864: Lizzie Plummer Bliss, and American art collector and patron, and a co-fpundre of the Museum for Modern Art, born.

    "...At the end of May 1929, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller invited her friends Lillie P. Bliss and Mary Quinn Sullivan for lunch in order to discuss the establishment of a museum of modern art. Another invited guest was art collector A. Conger Goodyear, who had previously served as a board member of the Albright Art Gallery in Buffalo, and who also participated in the meeting. Goodyear agreed to chair this circle as president, Lillie P. Bliss became his deputy and Abby Aldrich Rockefeller was given the role of treasurer. A short time later they were joined by art historian and collector Paul J. Sachs, a friend of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, publisher Frank Crowninshield, a friend of Lillie P. Bliss, and Josephine Porter Boardman, a friend both to Bliss and Rockefeller, who hosted a literary salon in New York. On November 7, the first exhibition of the Museum of Modern Art opened in rented spaces in the Heckscher Building at 730 Fifth Avenue (corner of Fifth Avenue and 57th Street) in Manhattan. To the first exhibition of Post-Impressionism, entitled Cezanne, Gauguin, Seurat, Van Gogh, Bliss in turn contributed some paintings from her collection.[3]...

...Although Lillie P. Bliss was weakened by cancer the last months of her life, she participated actively in the formation of the Museum of Modern Art until shortly before her death. For example, March 2, 1931, she visited the exhibition Toulouse-Lautrec/Redon to which she had contributed three works by Odilon Redon and her paintings of Toulouse-Lautrec. On March 12, 1931 Lillie P. Bliss died in New York. She found her final resting place on the Woodlawn Cemetery. Two months after her death, the Museum of Modern Art presented in its 12th exhibition Works by 24 Artists from the Collection of Lillie P. Bliss, in memory of the Museum co-founder...."http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lillie_P._Bliss

File:Lillie P. Bliss.jpg

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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15-Apr-2012 at 03:18
April 12th:

1834: Harriet Burbank Rogers born

1841: Jennie Maria Drinkwater born

1844: Mollie Evelyn Moore Davis born

1883:

Imogen Cunningham born (photographer)

1898: Eleanor Touroff Glueck born

1904: Lily Fons born

1975: Josephine Baker died


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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15-Apr-2012 at 03:19
April 13th:

    1825: Julia Amanda Sargent Wood born

    1854: Lucy Craft Laney born

    1886: Ethel Leginskea born

    1893: Nella Larsen born

    1909: Eudora Welty born


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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15-Apr-2012 at 03:20
April 14th:

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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Apr-2012 at 02:09
April 15th:

1829: Mary Harris Thompson , an American physician and surgeon, born

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ilmhtduv/history_files/image002.jpg

1858: Milicent Washburn Shinn , an American educator having the first PhD in Education from the University of CA, born

http://gse.berkeley.edu/admin/communications/images/History_Shinn.jpg

1865: Emily James Putnam, an American educator, born

"...She graduated from Bryn Mawr College in 1889 and studied at Girton College, Cambridge University, in 1889-90. She was teacher of Greek at the Packer Collegiate Institute, Brooklyn, in 1891-93. She was a fellow in Greek at the University of Chicago in 1893-94, and dean of Barnard College in 1894-1900. She married George Haven Putnam in 1899.She was a trustee of Barnard College in 1900-05, and vice-president and manager of the Women's University Club, New York City, in 1907-11. In 1901-04 she was president of the League for Political Education...." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emily_James_Smith_Putnam

http://barnard.edu/sites/default/files/images/inline/putnamsmith97.jpg

1898 (or 1894?): Bessie Smith , an American blues singer, born

Bessie Smith


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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Apr-2012 at 02:25
April 16th:

    1163: Holy Roman Emperor Frederick Barbarossa wrote an order of protection for abbess Hildegard of Bingen (composer, writer, scientist, author, poet, theologian, religious leader)

    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-oQ7FEJh96Hk/T16310Nr2UI/AAAAAAAAAcQ/5xVtDPlKLTk/s1600/Hildegard-of-Bingen.jpg

    1838: Martha McClellan Brown born

    "... Born in Baltimore, Maryland, she and her husband published a temperance newspaper, she was an organizer of the Women's Christian Temperance Union, and was a leader of the Prohibition Party in Ohio. She served as vice-president of the Cincinnati Wesleyan Women's College...."http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martha_McClellan_Brown

    1845: Mary Eliza Mahoney , the first American professional nurse, born

    http://www.blackpast.org/files/blackpast_images/Mary_Eliza_Mahoney.jpg

    1865: Grace Livingston Hill , an American novelist, born

    "...Hill's first novel was written to make enough money for a vacation to Chautauqua in New York while the family was living in Florida. Lack of funds was a frequent motivator, particularly after the death of her first husband left her with two small children and no income other than that from her writing. After the death of Hill's father, her mother came to live with her. This prompted Hill to write more frequently. During and after her failed ten-year marriage to second husband Flavius Josephus Lutz, a church organist 15 years her junior (she did not divorce but stopped using his surname after he left in May 1914), she continued to write to support her children and mother.

Although many of her earlier novels were specifically intended to proselytize, Hill's publishers frequently removed overt references to religious themes. After her publishers realized the popularity of her books, references to religious topics were allowed to remain, although she later modified her writing style to appeal to a more secular audience. The last Grace Livingston Hill book, "Mary Arden", was finished by her daughter Ruth Livingston Hill and published in 1947. Hill's books are still in circulation and many of her short stories are available in compilation novels...." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grace_Livingston_Hill

http://www.ladybluestocking.com/GLH/GLH-Portrait-Blue.jpg

    1879: Bernadette Soubirous (Sister Marie-Bernard, Saint Bernadette) died. She had visions of the Virgin Mary.

    http://www.biographyonline.net/spiritual/images/stbernadette-best.jpg

    1889: Frieda Segelke Miller born

    "... FSM, labor administrator and official, was born at La Crosse, Wisconsin, on April 16, 1889. Her parents, James Gordon, a lawyer, and Erna Segelke, died when FSM was small, leaving Frieda and her younger sister Elsie to be reared by their grandmother, Augusta (Mrs. Charles) Segelke of La Crosse. FSM received her BA from Milwaukee-Downer College (later Lawrence University), Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1911; she then spent four years doing graduate work in economics, sociology, political science, and law at the University of Chicago, but did not complete a degree.

FSM spent the next several years at a variety of jobs, including secretary to the Philadelphia branch of the Women's Trade Union League (1918-1923) where she met her lifelong friend Pauline Newman. In 1929 Frances Perkins appointed FSM director of the Division of Women in Industry and Minimum Wage at the New York State Department of Labor; she was instrumental in the passage of New York's Minimum Wage Law for Women and Minors in 1933. In 1938 Governor Herbert Lehman appointed FSM Industrial Commissioner of New York, a post she held until 1943 when she left to become special assistant for labor to John C. Winant, U. S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom.
Late in 1944 FSM became director of the Women's Bureau of the U.S. Department of Labor. Her major responsibility was the reintegration of women into the economy after their displacement by veterans returning to their pre-war jobs. She conducted studies to examine labor laws and vocational improvements in the conditions of women in the labor force. A Roosevelt appointee, FSM left the Women's Bureau in 1953 at the request of President Eisenhower.
During the 1950s and 1960s FSM focused on international labor issues. As early as 1936 she had begun representing the U.S. at International Labor Organization conferences; after leaving the Women's Bureau she went to work full-time for the ILO and conducted several major surveys in Asia and the Middle East of working conditions and opportunities for women and children. For a short period (1957-1958) she also represented the International Alliance of Women at the United Nations.
In the early 1960s FSM became UN representative for the European organization the International Union for Child welfare, conducting an International Child Welfare Survey (#227) and participating in various UNICEF projects. She left the UN in 1967 at the age of 78.
During her long professional life FSM was affiliated with a number of other organizations concerned with women's role in the economy, including the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions, the International Council of Women, the Women's Trade Union League, and the International Ladies Garment Worker's Union. She was much in demand both as a speaker and a writer and maintained an international reputation in her field. Her contributions to women and labor were recognized in 1940 when she was awarded an honorary doctorate of humane letters by Russell Sage College.
FSM never married, but in 1923 while in Germany she adopted a daughter, Elisabeth. For most of her life she lived in New York, maintaining a summer home in Connecticut and later one in Pennsylvania; she spent the last four years of her life in a New York City nursing home where she died on July 21, 1973...." http://oasis.lib.harvard.edu/oasis/deliver/~sch00235



Edited by Don Quixote - 17-Apr-2012 at 02:26
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17-Apr-2012 at 22:00
April 17th:
File:Isabel Chapin Barrows.png
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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Apr-2012 at 03:04
April 18th:

    1829: Mother Mary Baptist Russell born

    "...She was born at Newry, County Down, Ireland, on 18 April 1829, baptized as Katherine. She entered the Sisters of Mercy convent at Kinsdale in November 1848. The next year she helped nurse victims of a cholera epidemic, an experience that was useful later. She received her habit on 7 July 1849, and with it the name Mary Baptist. She made her final profession of vows in August 1851, and for the next three years she taught at the convent school.

...Mary Baptist was appointed superior of the eight sisters chosen to start the mission in San Francisco, and received the title of Mother. The pioneer sisters arrived in New York City in October 1854 and reached San Francisco on 8 December. They considered the date of their arrival an auspicious sign; it was the same day as the Feast of the Immaculate Conception, a Catholic holiday honoring Mary, who was the model for the sisters life and work and from whom they all took their first names.

...In 1855 there was an outbreak of the disease in San Francisco, and Mother Mary Baptist volunteered her sisters as nurses at the public hospital. The sisters worked so well that city officials signed a contract with Mother Mary Baptist whereby the sisters would staff all the public hospitals in San Francisco. The income from hospital work allowed the Sisters of Mercy to open their own institutions. In 1855 they started a House of Mercy for San Franciscos unemployed young women, and within a year the sisters were teaching in Catholic schools. Bishop Alemany wanted the nuns to take the examinations given to public schoolteachers; if they passed, then the Catholic schools of San Francisco could have a share of the tax money spent on education. ...

....She then opened Saint Marys Hospital, the first Catholic hospital on the Pacific coast. She went on to organize in 1861 in San Francisco the first Magdalene Asylum, an institution for prostitutes. Like most people at the time, she regarded prostitution and sex outside marriage as a sin. However, she also realized that it was more than just a moral issue; young women without skills had few job opportunities, and their most common employment, domestic service, put them in situations where men could harass them with relative impunity. The Magdalene Asylum taught women skills so that they could find other jobs. In 1872 Mother Mary Baptist founded a home for the aged and infirm.

....In 1859 Mother Mary Baptist founded the Sodality of Our Lady. Women who joined the sodality paid dues and made other charitable contributions to the Sisters of Mercy, prayed for them and their work, and organized fundraisers to attract contributions from the larger San Francisco community. Although the city did not provide regular income for the Sisters of Mercys work among the needy, it could provide occasional bonuses. In 1868 Mother Mary Baptist and her sisters entered the citys hospitals again, this time to nurse smallpox victims at the pesthouse. As a token of gratitude, the city gave the Catholic nuns $5,000 in 1870.

Legacy. Almost as soon as she arrived, Mother Mary Baptist expanded the Sisters of Mercy beyond San Francisco and established a convent and school at Sacramento. Thanks to the work of this Catholic nun, California by the 1890s had a system of charitable care to match that of other states in the Union. Mother Mary Baptist continued her good works until her death in 1898...." http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1G2-2536601481.html

http://www.mercyworld.org/_uploads/pages/foundress/F0AAC0B4-2219-A8B0-B6E64B236EE72387.jpg


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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-Apr-2012 at 03:05
April 19th:

1666: Sarah Kemble Knight born (writer, businesswoman, educator)

1689: Christina, abdicated Queen of Sweden, died

1830: Malvina Pray Florence born

1831: Mary Louise Booth born

1832: Lucretia Rudolph Garfield born

1856: Anna Sarah Kugler born

1858: May Robson born


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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Apr-2012 at 03:19
April 20th:

    1795: Cynthia Farrar born

    1894: Caroline Beaumont Zuchry born


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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Apr-2012 at 03:20
April 21st:

1729: Catherine II of Russia (Catherine the Great) born

1816: Charlotte Brontë born

1829: Abigail (Abby) May born

1836: Anna Callender Brackett born

1838: Charlotte Emerson Brown born

1859: Belle Case LaFollette born

1891: Georgia Harkness born

1895: Geraldine Pratt May born

1926: Elizabeth Alexandra Mary - later Queen Elizabeth II - born to Elizabeth, Duchess of York, and Albert, Duke of York

1959: Dancer Margot Fonteyn was released from a 24-hour stay in a Panamanian jail. Her husband was part of an attempt to overthrow the government


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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-Apr-2012 at 03:21
April 22nd:

    1451: Isabella I born (ruler of Castile and Aragon, equally with her husband, Ferdinand)

    1830: Emily Davis born (educator, feminist)

    1845: Ursula Newell Gestefeld born

    1857: Ada Rehan born

    1873: Ellen Glasgow born

    1943: Louise Elizabeth Gluc k (Glück) born (English professor and poet: won Pulitzer Prize 1973, U.S. poet laureate 2003-2004)

    1996: Erma Bombeck died


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  Quote Don Quixote Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24-Apr-2012 at 02:28
April 23rd:

1533: Thomas Cranmer, archbishop of Canterbury, granted an annulment of the marriage of Catherine of Aragon 

to Henry VIII of England -- Henry's soon-to-be-next wife, Anne Boleyn

was already pregnant


1783: Lady Agnes Surriage Frankland, and American colonial figure, died. I couldn't find a short bio, but here is a paper on her http://archive.org/stream/fountaininnagne02sanbgoog#page/n10/mode/2up

1797: Penina Moise , the first American to publish a Jewish Hymnal, born .

"...Penina Moïse was born on April 23, 1797, to a large and wealthy family in Charleston, South Carolina. Her father, Abraham, was a successful Alsatian-born merchant. Her mother, Sarah, was the daughter of a wealthy family from the island of St. Eustace, where she met and married Abraham in 1779. They came to Charleston in 1791, fleeing a slave insurrection. Moïse was the sixth of nine children and the youngest daughter. Her brothers, Cherie, Aaron, Hyam, and Benjamin, were born in the Caribbean. Her older sister Rachel and her younger brothers, Jacob, Abraham, and Isaac, were born in the United States. She left school at age twelve, after her father’s death. Moïse served as the family nurse, caring for her mother and brother Isaac, an asthma sufferer. Always nearsighted, during the Civil War her eyesight deteriorated into blindness.

Moïse grew up in the presence of a diverse, vital, and well-integrated Jewish community, devoting herself to Jewish issues. She was encouraged in her poetry by her brother Jacob and sister Rachel, and her work appeared in both the Jewish and general press. Her 1833 collection of poems, Fancy’s Sketch Book, was the first by a Jewish American woman. Moïse also wrote columns for newspapers throughout the United States. Her poetry covered a variety of topics, including current events, politics, local life, Judaism, Jewish rights, and Jewish ritual reform.

Along with her literary endeavors, Moïse devoted her life to teaching. In 1845, she became the second superintendent of Congregation Beth Elohim’s Sunday school. The Civil War forced Moïse to leave Charleston for Sumter, South Carolina. Returning after the war in much reduced circumstances, she supported herself by running an academy together with her widowed sister and her niece. Though self-conscious about her poverty, she accepted it with humor and grace.Moïse was the first Jewish American woman to contribute to the worship service, writing 190 hymns for Beth Elohim. The Reform movement’s 1932 Union Hymnal still contained thirteen of her hymns...." http://jwa.org/encyclopedia/article/moise-penina

http://www.scmuseum.org/women/Images/Moise.jpg

1887: Pauline Morton Sabin born
"...Pauline Sabin was a wealthy, elegant, socially prominent, and politically well-connected New Yorker. She was the daughter of Paul Morton, Secretary of the Navy under President Theodore Roosevelt,[1] and granddaughter of J. Sterling Morton, Secretary of Agriculture under President Grover Cleveland.[2] She married J. Hopkinson Smith, Jr., in 1907. They divorced in 1914.[2] In 1916 she married Charles H. Sabin, president of the Guaranty Trust Company[1] and treasurer of the Association Against the Prohibition Amendment (AAPA).

Before 1929, she favored small government and free markets. She initially supported prohibition, as she later explained: "I felt I should approve of it because it would help my two sons. The word-pictures of the agitators carried me away. I thought a world without liquor would be a beautiful world." Sabin was very active in Republican politics. She was growing increasingly disenchanted with prohibition but worked on behalf of Herbert Hoover in the election of 1928 despite his uncertain stand on the issue. In his inauguration speech he vowed to enforce anti-liquor legislation. After the enactment of the Jones Act in May 1929 drastically increased penalties for the violation of prohibition, she resigned from the Republican National Committee and took up the cause of repealing prohibition...." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pauline_Sabi

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-6puxy__4Rp4/TuAC-lrgofI/AAAAAAAAA6w/5a2y2YrUuIQ/s1600/14929935.jpg



Edited by Don Quixote - 24-Apr-2012 at 02:31
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